The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 21.01.1961, Blaðsíða 2

The White Falcon - 21.01.1961, Blaðsíða 2
WHITE FALCON Saturday, January 21, 1961 We Believe It's Worth It In our issue of November 12, 1960, the WHITE FALCON suggested that every member of the services be given training in diplomacy—the end result would be a thorough understanding or as we said .... to attain a complete understanding-maintaining decorum among foreign people—adapting to local customs—observing laws—learning to be a good neighbor. We also suggested that some day base brouchures would devote a chapter on "This Is Your Host" and that in NATO countries another booklet would devote a chapter to "These Are Your Guests." And now comes a story in the NATO LETTER of December 1960 Which is written by Max Beloff, Glad- stone Professor of Government and Public Administra- tion in the University of Oxford. Entitled, "Fact and Fiction in the Atlantic Com- munity" the author notes, "It is important to accelerate the communication of ideas—scientific, social, military, political—if our Alliance is to flourish." Mr. Beloff's article is of particular interest to us who serve in a NATO force and to those in whose lands we are called to serve. For this reason, the WHITE FALCON is devoting much of its space to the article. We believe it gives much food for thought and is worth the serious-reading time of those stationed at Keflavik and our Icelandic audience. • • • Of the Minuteman Railroaders Learn AFNS—By mounting Minuteman solid-fueled ICBMs on trains and shuttling them back and forth across the Country the U. S. possesses a strategic weapon almost impossible to neutralize—and one that insures instant retaliation against an enemy attack on this country. This was the theme of an address before the American Rail- road Executives Association, meeting in Seattle, Washington, Dec. 13, by Lt. Gen. Bernard A. Schriever, Commander, Air Research and Development Command. He complimented the railroaders on their wholehearted support of the Air Force's mobile Minuteman program. "Fortunately, we have been able to depend upon the railroads and their combined estimated investment of more than $35 billion in road and equipment. We have been offered access to many thous- ands of miles of usable track and the services of 1,000,000 ex- perienced railroad personnel. General Schriever noted the»rapid development of ballistic missiles, and acknowledged the present inability to strike in- coming enemy missiles from the air. Until we have such a capa- bility our best defense is the ability to mount an offensive, he said. The mobile Minuteman constitutes such a defense. Inherent in this philosophy is the necessity for protecting our own weapons against surprise attack, the general said. He described two courses adopted by the Air Force to achieve survivability— hardening with dispersal, and mobility. Minuteman is being developed to fit both of these conditions. "By positioning large numbers of Minuteman missiles in hard- ened, underground sites we make it economically feasible to mount an impressive counterforce of tremendous power. We levy maximum demands on an enemy's accuracy, timing and salvo capability," General Schriever told his listeners. "By deploying quantities of Minuteman missiles on trains which can move freely in random fashion, we greatly complicate the enemy's targeting problems. By blending credible survivability and strike effectiveness into our Minuteman forces, we arrive at a favorable cost-effectiveness ratio." General Schriever emphasized the lack of danger in having a substantial number of nuclear-tipped missiles "roaming about our country and through our communities." "Transporting a Minuteman missile about the Country will be no more hazardous than the movement of a gasoline tank car," he said. Commenting on the economy of the Minuteman, and the efforts of ARDC to reduce installations cost to the bone, General Schriever called attention to savings to be made in the launch control system. THE WHITE FALCON Col. Benjamin G. Willis, USAF Commander, Air Forces Iceland The WHITE FALCON is an otticial Class II Armed Forces newspaper published weekly at Ketlavik Airport, Iceland bv Air Forces Iceland of the Military Air Transport Service tor all contingents stationed at Keflavik Airport. The WHITE FALCON receives AFP8 and AFNB materials. 'Views and opinions expressed herein are not necessarily those ot the Department of Defense. Information Officer.......... .......Capt. Warren J. Papin, USAF Editor ............................ SSgt. Clarence J. Bizet, USAF Isafoldoi-prentsmlOla h.f. Sgt. Morris Aids State With Call Washington, D. C. (MNS)—A MATS radio operator from the 1254th ATW at Washington In- ternational Airport may have helped save Haile Selassie's Ethi- opian Kingdom this month. At the height of the recent up- rising Addis Abeba, a three-con- tinent radio-telephone hookup be- tween Haile Selassie and one of his generals was accomplished by SSgt. Kenneth W. Morris, radio operator aboard a 1254th aircraft which flew several U. S. Senators on a trip to Africa. The call, which took about seven hours to set up and complete, went from the MATS plane in Liberia to Andrews AFB, Md., to Paris, and then to Asmara in Ethiopia. The King stopped in Liberia on a flight to Ethiopia from Brazil. Unable to contact Ethiopia direct from Liberia, he went to the American Ambassador at Liberia for assistance. Results followed quickly. The ambassador sent a man out to the airfield to talk to Sergeant Morris. After trying to contact Paris directly, with no luck be- cause of atmospheric disturbance, the sergeant radioed Andrews AFB, Maryland which in turn reached Paris—and the Emperor talked with his ambassador in Paris from aboard the aircraft. Another relay was set up in the same way, from the plane to Andrews to Paris to Ethiopia. The King talked with his general in Ethiopia for about 30 minutes. The Whys and Hows VP Scans Area Seas Patrol Squadron 10, Det. 13 is now patrolling the waters sur- rounding Iceland in their Lock- heed Neptune patrol bombers ((P2V-5F). The squadron took over from Patrol Squadron 11 without interruption of patrols when they arrived here Jan. 8 and 9. Here for five months, the squadron is commanded by Cdr. T. J. Brady. He has 21 officers and 119 enlisted men who are "eager and ready to maintain the excellent record set by Patrol Squadron 11." This Wednesday, Commander Brady turned over the squadron to Cdr. Jens B. Hansen. The out- going Commander will fly to Rota, Spain, to take command of Patrol Squadron 10 which is now com- manded by Cdr. R. A. Kimener. The squadron comes here with a record of two Battle Efficiency "Es" which they won in 1958 and 1959. While scanning the Iceland- ic environ, the squadron will con- tinue its efforts, already started, toward another "E". Aerospace Power for *4lR FO*C Workers Health Benefits "Q" AND "A" ABOUT FEDERAL WORKERS HEALTH BENEFITS ACTS AFNS—The following questions and answers have been prepared by the Civil Service Commission to answer the many inquiries being received about the Retired Federal Employees Health Benfits Act winch authorizes a program of health benefits for retired Federal employees and survivor annuitants. Many questions cannot be answered in detail at this time because regulations have not yet been issued and the contract for the uniform Government-wide plan has not been negotiated. GENERAL Q. What are the two new laws which are concerned with health benefits for active or retired Federal employees? A. The Federal Employees Health Benefits Act of 1959 (Public Law 86-382) and the Retired Federal Employees Health Benefits Act of 1960 (Public Law 86-724). Q. What is the purpose of each? A. The Health Benefits Act of 1959, which became effective in July 1960, authorizes a health benefits program for active employees and their families. Employees (and their survivors) who are enrolled under the 1959 Act may continue their coverage after retirement (or death) if they meet certain requirements. The Retired Federal Employees Health Benefits Act of 1960 authorizes a health benefits program for retired employees and survivor annuitants ineligible to participate in the program set up under the 1959 Act because the employees' Federal employ- men terminated in retirement or death before the July 1960 ef- fective date of the active employee program. Q. Why wasn't just one law enacted to cover both groups? A. In general, retired employees are in the higher age brackets and therefore make greater use of health benefits. The cost of providing benefits for older persons is from two to three times the cost of providing benefits to younger persons. There- fore, combining the two programs presented a difficult problem. Rather than delay both programs, Congress decided to provide one for active employees and to continue to seek a solution to the additional problems involved in providing health benefits coverage for persons who were already annuitants when the 1959 Act became effective. Q. Will the annuitant heath benefits plan, for which the Com- mission will contract, be less liberal than the plan for active employees? A. Yes. The only alternative would be a premium rate which most annuitants could not afford to pay. Q. When will the Retired Federal Health Benefits Act become effective? A. July 1, 1961. ELIGIBILITY Q. Who is eligible for benefits under the Retired Federal Employees Health Benefit Act? A. In general, the following individuals are eligible: * An employee who retired before July 1960 on an immediate annuity after 12 years or more of service or for disability. * A member of a family who receives an immediate annuity as the survivor of such a retired Federal employee. * A member of a family who receives an immediate annuity as the survivor of an employee who died in service after completing 5 or more years of service. Q. What is an immediate annuity? A. For a retired employee, an immediate annuity is one which begins not later than one month after separation from the service. For a survivor, an immediate annuity is one which begins not later than one month after the death of the employee or annuitant whose service forms the basis for the annuity. Q. Does the Retired Federal Employees Health Benefits Act pertain only to persons receiving annuities under the Civil Service System or monthly compensation under the Federal Employees Compensation Act? A. No. Annuitants under the following retirement systems may also be eligible: Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. Foreign Service. Policemen and Firemen of the District of Columbia. Public School Teachers of the District of Columbia. Lighthouse Service. Federal Courts. Q. Are any groups of persons specifically excluded from coverage? A. Yes. (1) Annuitants receiving annuities under the Tenn- essee Valley Authority Retirement System; (2) Retired employees (or their survivor annuitants) who retired from a position with a corporation under the supervision of the Farm Credit Ad- ministration, if any member of the board of directors of such corporation is elected or appointed by private interests; (3) Retired employees (or their survivor annuitants) who are not United States citizens and whose permanent duty stations were outside the United States on the day before they became an- nuitants. Q. Some employees were retired from positions with the Tennessee Valley Authority but receive their annuities under the Civil Service Retirement System. Are they eligible? A. No, because at the time of their retirement they were Tennessee Valley Authority employees and, as such, are excluded from coverage by the Act. (To be continued.) Peace Through Deterrence * * * * *

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