The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 28.01.1961, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 28.01.1961, Blaðsíða 1
Our 'missidn' Jfs TD PRODUCE Service news White ffiW /^ND WE INTEND ^ULL CDVERAGE JJn EACH ISSUE Volume XI, Number 4 Headquarters, Air Forces Iceland, Keflavik Airport, Iceland—A MATS Unit Saturday, January 28, 1961 Better Health Drive to Start Defense Force personnel at Keflavik Airport will join with, other military and civilian Federal employees all over the world next Tuesday in seeking better health for all through participation in the*^ Column to Appear Beginning next week the WHITE FALCON will start a "For Sale" column. All ads must be submitted in writing to the WHITE FALCON office by Tuesday noon of each week. No ads will be accepted by phone. National Health Agencies' cam- paign. In a recent letter to his com- ponent commanders, IDF Com- mander, Col. Benjamin G. Willis, said, "The purpose of this cam- paign is to provide each Federal employee and military member of the Iceland Defense Force an op- portunity to support ten volun- tary national health agencies in order to assure that each parti- cipating agency has the vitally needed support to help carry on its fight against a major nation- al health menace." Colonel Willis also added, "While we have no set goal, we should strive for 100 per cent participation." Col. Myron F. Barlow, Chair- man of the AFI Fund Raising Committee, said that the drive would be conducted between Jan. 31 and Feb. 16, and would be for the support of the following re- cognized organizations: National Society for Crippled Children and Adults, Inc., National Society for the Prevention of Blindness, Unit- ed Cerebral Palsy Associations, Inc., American Cancer Society, Inc., American Heart Association, Inc., Arthritis and Rheumatism Foundation, Muscular Dystrophy Associations of America, Inc., National Association for Mental Health, Inc., National Association for Retarded Children, Inc., Na- tional Multiple Sclerosis Society. Project Officers have been se- lected for each organization. They will select a Keyman for each twenty-five people assigned to their unit. The Keymen will per- sonally contact each person on their list and give them an enve- lope in which to place their con- tributions. After the envelopes have been collected they will be turned in to Maj. Henry C. Jes- sup, Fund Drive Coordinator. Because of personal reasons, many people desire to contribute their support to one specific health agency. Provision has been made this year on the contribu- tion envelope for each contributor to designate how much of the gift they want each agency of their choice to receive. In authorizing this fifth annual drive, the President of the United States said, "Our voluntary health and welfare agencies are a tradi- tional and significant part of the American scene. Established to meet our human needs, they find their strength in our generosity." Flyers Post Safety First The Air Forces Iceland pilots, supported by ground crews who put their best efforts in maintaining Keflavik aircraft, have flown the first Zero-Accident Rate year "^since the Air Force has been here, Reciprocation Attitude Reigns As Airmen Visit Last Sunday, five Icelandic families hosted ten men of the Iceland Defense Force. The Ice- landers and their guests shared this occasion as a gesture of friendship and reciprocation of the treatment the daughters and sons of the hosts were receiving as guests in American homes through the American Field Ser- vice. The Defense Force Members were shown the gallery of Einar Jonsson's works when the widow of the famed Icelandic sculpture had the exhibition opened on Sun- day especially for them. As guests at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Julius M. Magnus, they sampled Icelandic pancakes and hors d'oeuvres. The Magnus's have a son living with Mr. and Mrs. Clifford N. Hathaway in Joilet, Illinois. Mr. Magnus, a former U.S. Army paratrooper with 11 combat jumps during WW II joined in a songfest as Airman Dave Boatwright played piano accompanied by other ser- GIVE for BETTER H EALTH Icelanders vicemen and Icelandic hosts sing- ing a variety of songs. As a former soldier, Mr. Mag- nus tried his hand at giving a few military commands such as ordering "Chow Call" and "vol- unteers for KP". Needless to say, only the first order was obeyed. After this, the party went to the Naust restaurant where they were given a banquet-style din- ner complete with native Iceland- ic delicacies. A songfest started in the Naust which soon had the (Continued to Page U.) to your NATIONAL HEALTH AGENCIES REMEMBER-A GIFT FROM EVERYONE MEANS BETTER HEALTH FOR ALL! Commander Has Second NCO Dining-ln The first sergeants, E-8s and 9s had their second Dining-in with the Air Forces Iceland (AFI) Commander, Col. Benjamin G. Willis. The group of 38 had a steak dinner at the NCO Open Mess last week. Before dinner, Colonel Willis talked to all the NCOs, which essentially are an Advisory Coun- cil, in small groups before the main discussion. During the main discussion, Colonel Willis revived the idea of a new uniform for NCOs of the 7, 8 and 9 grade levels. The Commander said he felt that NCOs in those levels could af- ford the uniforms and at the same time enjoy a mark of dis- tinction among their fellow air- men. NCOs at the remaining two levels were not forgotten. The Colonel and the senior NCOs dis- cussed new avenues of offering them added prestige; and that went for the lower grade airmen. The three-day-pass recreation flight to Germany is seen as a morale booster; also discussed was means of increasing morale and a keeping constant watch for the welfare of airmen should be bywords for Keflavik Airport leaders. Col. Benjamin G. Willis, com- mander of AFI, in a letter to the pilots, said "Congratulations for this achievement must not end with the flying operations or with maintenance, but must also be ex- tended for the exemplary support functions of the Civil Engineers, Flight Facilities, CAA, Supply, and in fact, everyone associated directly or indirectly with support of the flying mission." Colonel Willis expressed his appreciation for this "remark- able achievement" and encourag- ed continuation of the good work in the forthcoming year. The Commander's letter was an endorsement to one sent by Col. H. McDonnell, chief, Safety Di- vision, MATS. The Safety Chief noted that "such accomplishments do not just happen, but are caused, in- tentionally and through unified effort behind the safety program in your command." Believing that the safety pro- gram was exemplary, the Chief of the MATS Safety Division asked that Capt. Charles A. Paul, write a 2,000 word article con- taining factual and specific in formation contributing to the Zero-Accident Year for the 'MATS Flyer.' This is a courtesy and an honor for the Flying Safety Officers who are able to 'pilot' an acci- dentless-year. Said Colonel Mc- Donnel, "....To inject other MATS commands with the safety serum you have developed and used so sucessfully, an article depicting your safety program and means of application is pro- posed." KA Masons Visit Reykjavik Club Members of the Northern Lights Masonic Club are exchang- ing visits with the Gimli Lodge in Reykjavik. Last week the Kef- lavik group and the Icelandic Masons conferred two apprentice degrees in English. After the ceremonies the Mas- ons enjoyed an evening of festivi- ties. The Northern Lights Masonic Club meets in the party room of the NCO Club on the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month. D;nner is served at 7 p.m., and all Masons are invited to attend. U.S. AIR FORCE — AEROSPACE POWER FOR PEACE

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The White Falcon

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