The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 25.02.1961, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 25.02.1961, Blaðsíða 1
Our 'missidn1 Jfs TD PRDDUCE Service news Wh m ®7/! alccn /^ND WE INTEND ^ULL CDVERAGE J?N EACH ISSUE Volume XI, Number 8 Headquarters, Air Forces Iceland, Keflavik Airport, Iceland—A MATS Unit Saturday, February 25, 1961 This is to introduce a new feature for the White Falcon. This space is primarily for the use of bits of information about people, thing's and happenings. Contributions for this column are solicited and may be turn- ed in by calling extension 4156. Editor. * * * The Air Force Saturday goes forth into battle against jack- rabbits — symbols of the Old West that have become a men- ace to flying. Kelly AFB plans to use a cordon of airmen to drive the rabbits into an area at one end of the runways where Air Police will dispatch them with guns. Officials say the drive is necessary to keep the runways relatively free of rab- bits which have created a haz- ard to takeoffs and landings. Buzzards and hawks attracted by carcasses of rabbits hit by planes are an added menace. More than 2,000 rabbits were killed in a similar one-day cam- pagin 18 months ago. sH. * * . In these days of "Ben Hur," "Spartacus," and other screen spectacles — Hollywood calls them "blockbusters," it would seem that movies couldn't get any longer. But the Air Force could piece together the gran- daddy of them all — a movie that would run for three and a half years from start to fin- ish. In length it would be more than 85 million feet; to as- semble it in one roll would re- quire a reel 250 feet in dia- meter. As for blockbusting, some of its WW II combat footage would put any movie- land production to shame. What is it? It is part of the Air Force's celluloid history, dat- ing way back to the early flights of the Wright brothers. * * * i Selection boards to recom- mend regular and reserve war- rant officers for permanent pro- motion to CWO 2, CWO 3, and CWO 4 are scheduled to meet at USAF Headquarters beginning April 3. The board will consider temporary war- rant officers who do not hold reserve appointments. * * # The standard saying here.. "only 364 mo-to-go" may be ousted by another quotation over-heard at one of the local bus stops. One guy says, "Hot dog, only 38 more days to go." Said another .. "Shux, I've just got three more linen changes left." Commander Se COLONEL BENJAMIN G. WILLIS Nominated For Brigadier General . . . AFI Receives Award For Fly-Safety Record Air Forces Iceland has won the MATS Outstanding Unit Award for its excellent flying safety record during 1960, Col. Benjamin G. Willis, commander, announced this week. During the past year, AFI did not have a single aircraft acci- dent. The unit was one of six in Military Air Transport Service to achieve this notch as MATS set an all-time flying safety rec- ord In accomplishing this outstand- ing record, AFI and 57th Fighter pilots flew 10,226 hours. This is about average flying time here with flight hours recorded during other years ranging from 7,700 hours to 12,000. Aircraft involved included F-89s; C-118s; T-33s; C-54s; C-47, and the copter. In notifying Colonel Willis of the award, Lt. Gen. Joe W. Kelly, MATS commander wrote: "I am pleased to announce that Air Forces Iceland has been se- lected to receive the Outstanding Unit Award for having operated throughout calendar year 1960 with a zero aircraft accident rate. The savings in material and hum- an resources that this record re- presents, far exceed the recogni- tion that is possible through any award. Every officer and airman can take just pride in his per- sonal contribution to this record. "Please pass to your personnel my appreciation and congratula- tions for a truly outstanding ach- ievement, together with my best wishes for continued success in the field of flying safety." Colonel Willis had this to say in a letter: "I wish to extend my apprecia- tion to each of the responsible commanders, ' to the supervisors who direct the activities carrying out their commander's responsi- bilities, and to everyone wlio so successfully fulfilled the vast re- quirements of aircraft accident prevention." In 1959 Keflavik Airport had four major aircraft accidents re- sulting in the destruction of three aircraft and the loss of two air- (See, Award, Page b.) Col. Willis to Receive Upgrade to Brig.Gen. Colonel Benjamin G. Willis, commander of Iceland Defense Force (NATO) and Air Forces Iceland (MATS), was officially notified this week of his promotion nomina- tion by President Kennedy, to the^ rank of Brigadier General. The nomination now goes for- ward to the United States Senate for approval. The new general-elect was cal- led to active duty with the U. S. Cavalry in 1941 after earning an ROTC commission at Norwich University where he majored in Engineering and Economics In mid-1959, the colonel earned a Masters of Arts degree in Gov- ernment and Politics from the University of Maryland. After completing 30 weeks of basic and advance flying training in 1942 as a second lieutenant, Col. Willis served 19 months dur- ing WWII in England and France. He participated in the Air Of- fensive Europe, the Normandy Campaign, North France Cam- paign, and Rhineland Campaign, flying 63 combat mission in the B-26. Reassigned to Barksdale AFB, La., in September 1948, Col. Willis became commander of the 85th Bomb Squadron. He remained in the position until June of' 1949, at which time he attended the Air Command and Staff School at Montgomery, Ala. Reporting to Tactical Air Com- mand Headquarters, Langley AFB Va., in January of 1950, Col. Wil- lis was assigned as commander of the 47th Bomb Group (Light), equipped with B-45 jet bombers. In January, 1952, Col. Willis assumed the duties of Operations and Training Staff Officer, Head- quarters 49th Air Division at Langley AFB, until November, 1952, when he was assigned as Director of Operations and Train- ing, Headquarters Third Air Force. One of his most recent assign- ments was as Personal Air Force Assistant to the Honorable Har- old E. Stassen, Disarmament Staff, the White House, from May, 1955, to February of 1958. Immediately prior to his as- signment to Iceland he attended the National War College in Washington, D. C. His assignment as Commander Air Forces Ice- land, began July 24, 1959. Col. Willis then assumed command of Iceland Defense Force September 23, 1959. He is rated as a com- mand pilot. Married to the former Eugenia Jennings, Col. and Mrs. Willis have three children. Benjamin G. Jr., 20, presently attends the U.S. Air Force Academy. David J., 9, and Eugenia H., 6, are with their parents in Iceland. ***^m*#t* WIN SPORTMANSHIP TROPHY Although IKF, a team composed of Icelandic lads, won only two of their 26 games played, their playing conduct and the fact they ap- peared for every scheduled game, won the Sportmanship Trophy for the quintet. Here, Bogi Thorsteinsson, Chairman of the Keflavik Air- port Sports Club, accepts the torphy from Col. Myron F. Barlow, while Ingi Gunnarsson, team captain, looks on. U.S. AIR FORCE — AEROSPACE POWER FOR PEACE

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The White Falcon

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