The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 11.03.1961, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 11.03.1961, Blaðsíða 1
Our -mission' Jfs TD PRDDUCE Service news atcvh /^ND WE INTEND ^ULL COVERAGE J?N EACH ISSUE Volume XI, Number 10 Headquarters, Air Forces Iceland, Keflavik Airport, Iceland—A MATS Unit Saturday, March 11, 1961 Bishop John Gurmarsson of Reykjavik will conduct the 4:30 p.m. Mass at the Keflavik Air- port Chapel Guadete Sunday, (that's tomorrow.) The 25-voice Cathedral of Christ of Reykjavik will sing the High Mass. A good turn out is expected for this event. * * * Eight USAF C-130s and nine C-124s were engaged in the Congo Airlift that, from late January through Feb. 6, had flown 38 sorties transporting more than 435 tons of food. The airlift was initiated to car- ry food donated by various count- ries in response to an appeal from the United Nations Com- mand in the Congo and the Food and Agriculture Organization in Rome, Italy. * # * Restricted heretofore to recruit induction testing, the USAF mod- ern languages aptitude test is now being given to all personnel who are slated for language train- ing. USAF officials explained that this test measures language ability—hearing of sounds, rote memory, and grammar and syn- tax—without direct relation to the knowledge of a particular foreign language. * * * U.S. Air Force surplus C124 Globemasters are now being as- signed to the Air Force Reserve troop carrier fleet. Delivery of the first of eight C-124s to the 77th Troop Carrier squadron, Donaldson AFB, S.C., signaled the start of the transi- tion of Continental Air Com- mand's Reserve fleet, comprising over 700 transports, to four-en- gined aircraft. The 305th TCS, Tinker AFB, Okla., and the 706th TCS, Barks- dale AFB, La., will each receive eight of the big transports, while an undisclosed number of the air- craft are marked for delivery to other reserve squadrons in the near future. * * * The 1200 flying hour military portion of the T-38 Talon test schedule has been completed at Edwards AFB, Calif. The testing, conducted by USAF and Northrop pilots, began in April, 1959. It amassed some 2,000 flights as it finished one month ahead of schedule. The T-38 supersonic jet trainer will be assigned to the Air Train- ing Command. The Talon provides speeds of more than Mach 1.2, altitudes up to 60,000 feet and a rate of climb of 30,000 feet per minute, and will replace the T-33 "T-Bird" trainer. Fund Drive Ends On $2,723 CUB SCOUTS HOLD BANQUET Keflavik Airport's Cub Scout Pack 64 held its annual banquet at the NCO Club last week. Attending were Cubs and their parents. Here, Col. Benjamin G. Willis, IDF Commander, and Mrs. Willis, look on while their son David prepares an exhibition for the affair. Grass Grows Green at KA That grass you will soon see greening up around the dormitories didn't get there by chance—it was put there by choice. And the man responsible for putting it down, along with about 231 more acres^" around the base, is Mr. Palmi Arngrimsson of the Civil Engin- eering Squadron. Mr. Arngrims- son has been working steadily since late 1956 in an effort to seed and sod as much of the base as possible. He has succeeded very well in his project, according to a letter of appreciation he recent- ly received. The grass around the barracks and other buildings was brought from Reykjavik and laid out on specially prepared areas where it takes root and becomes a solid lawn. This comprises a total of some 71 acres. In addition, a commercial firm, Thytur Inc., of Reykjavik, was hired to seed and fertilize ap- proximately 231 acres of ground on the airfield. This project was carried out by aircraft. The main purpose of the seed- ing-sodding program is for dust control and beautification. Lawns and other areas planted with the grass seldom need watering. The letter states, in part: "Mr. Arngrimsson, Agronomist, 1400th Civil Engineering Squadron, is further to be commended not only for his part in the preparation of the revised land management plan, but in addition for his dili- gence and technical proficiency in the development and supervision of the overall land management program. It has been reported that his persistent efforts have been instrumental in transform- ing the community and dormitory areas from a dusty, rocky waste- land, to a reasonably large and pleasant living space of lawns, turfed recreational areas and limited landscape plantings. His success in adapting known techni- ques to the unusual climatic and soil conditions made it possible to establish low density vegetative cover for dust control of approxi- mately 231 acres of airfield grounds." Headquarters Squadron AFI Leads With Contributions Of $644.15 Headquarters Squadron, AFI, led the rest of the base in contributions as the United Fund Campaign ended with a total of $2,723.10 turned in. AFI, with 425 men assigned,*^ donated $644.15 to the campaign The best percentage was turn- 'Family Portraits1 Gives The Answer To Many Questions Do you know in what country the devil accompanies Santa Claus at Christmas time? Who does the food shopping in Lebanon? You'll find the answers to questions such as these on the new radio pro- gram, "Family Portraits," begin- ning next week over the Armed Forces Radio Service. These are a series of panel dis- cussions in which foreign ex- change students discuss and com- pare various aspects of life in their individual countries. Topics for discussion will include: life in the home; life in school; life as a young child; holidays and special days; life while traveling; the world of entertainment and sport; etc. Under the auspices of the Am- erican Field Service, these young people were the guests of Ameri- can families for a year—and sen- ior class students in various high schools—throughout the United States. The 15-minute programs, "Fa- mily Portraits," moderated by Jack Brown and Hal Davis, will be heard over AFRS each Monday and Tuesday morning at 9:15, be- ginning March 13th. In the first program, the panel begins a series of discussions on life in the home. One of the four panelists in the first program will be Miss Ragnheidur Olafsdottir, of Reykjavik. ed in by the Corps of Engineers. There are only 23 members in that organization and their total turn-in was $83.05. CAMRON, with 310 assigned, donated $308, followed by AACS with 307 people who turned in $218.95. Naval Air Facility, with 301 assigned, turned in $200.55, fol- lowed by Supply with 175 people who contributed $184.10. Other contributors, their as- signed strength and amount of donations include IDF, 83, $172.75 Air Base Squadron, 270, $166.90 Civil Engineers, 213, $160.05 Hospital, 135, $138.25; Transport- ation, 175, $115.50; 932nd AC&W, 198, $82.35; 57th Fighter Inter- ceptor Squadron, 57, $68.25; 667th AC&W, 171, $62.40; Naval Secur- ity Group, 58, $37.85; OSI, 22, $33.15; Weather, 31, $31.50; and Post Office unit, 16, $15.35. The drive began Feb. 1, and lasted two weeks. Outstanding Award Given AFI By MATS Official word has been received from Headquarters MATS that the flying safety award received by AFI is the MATS Outstand- ing Unit Award. AFI will receive a silver and mahogany plaque symbolizing the award. However, it does not aut- horize the wearing of any decor- ation by individuals. The MATS Outstanding Unit Award was received by AFI for achieving a zero aircraft accident rate in 1960. During 1959 the command had four major aircraft accidents re- sulting in the loss of two air- crewmen and the destruction of three aircraft with a direct cost of more than $6 million. Meeks Two Officially Reopens Meeks No. 2 dining hall was reopened officially last week aft- er completion of an extensive re- habilitation project. Work will be- gin soon on a similar project in Meeks No. 4. The bright, cheerful dining hall features decorative dividers which separate the airmen's and NCO's dining areas from the serving lines and kitchen. Colorful pictures and planters with ferns, vines and other orna- mental plants add to the setting which makes for relaxed dining. The newly repainted walls are set off with paintings of Iceland- ic scenes donated by the 1400th Air Base, CAMRON, Civil En- gineering and Supply squadrons. Rehabilitation of the dining halls is being done on a self-help basis. Civil Engineering furnishes materials, supervision and some labor, with most of the work being done by the using organiza- tions. • Plans also call for the dining halls to have taped dinner music to provide added atmosphere. U.S. AIR FORCE — AEROSPACE POWER FOR PEACE

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