The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 27.05.1961, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 27.05.1961, Blaðsíða 1
Buy Ydur Share Df America; Buy BdndsTdday Ydur Investment Is Safest In Savings Bdnds Volume XI, Number 20 Headquarters, Air Forces Iceland, Keflavik Airport, Iceland—A MATS Unit Saturday, May 27, 1961 tlotetfjth PaMtog Major Lawrence A. Keefe, for- mer IDF information officer, was awarded the Air Force Commend- ation Medal for meritorious ach- ievement during his tour of duty in Iceland. * * * A Boeing B-52 Stratofortress from the Air Proving Ground Center is making a series of low level flights over FAA approved routes in northwest Florida, southeast Georgia and southern Alabama. The eight-jet bomber will carry an unarmed North American- built GAM-77 Hound Dog air-to- ground missile under its wing. The flights are being conductec to determine the effects on th( missile system's operation of tur- bulence associated with low level flights. The GAM-77 missile will re- main attached to the B-52 throughout the flights and will not be launched. * * * "When the uses of nuclear en- ergy for rocket propulsion be- come feasible, man will control for the first time the energy need- ed to travel freely wherever he pleases in space," said Atomic Energy Commission Chairman Glenn T. Seaborg recently in a speech at San Francisco. "What is now science fiction may become scientific reality. On the basis of present scientific knowledge, I believe that nuclear propulsion could provide the most feasible means of accomplishing long voyages in space," he added. * * * The Air Force has awarded a $545,000 grant to the Medical Center of the University of Cali- fornia at Los Angeles for ad- vanced studies dealing with man's brain and nervous system during prolonged space flights. Air Force scientists reported a need for special studies on funda- mental brain mechanisms because the jet age has brought new stress and strain problems on the pilot. * * * The Department of the Air Force has selected the Sperry Rand Corporation, Great Neck, Long Island, N. Y., as the prime contractor to equip two C-4 troop carrier vessels with modern in- struments for use as range track- ing stations on the Atlantic Mis- sile Range. * * * If you hurry you may still be able to go on the Whale Bay tour tomorrow. The Viking Service Club is also accepting reserva- tions for the Reykjavik shopping tour on Memorial Day, next Tues- day, and the Akureyri tour on June 2. Opening Of Naval Station Heralds Change On July 1 -Q> $100 BOND MEMBERS Three Keflavik men know the best policy for putting away their extra dollars while serving their tour here. They are, (L-R) A2C Glen Porter, CAMRON, TSgt. Logan Shown, Supply, and A2C Johnnis Born, CAMRON. Each of the men have signed up for a $100 bond a month through the Class E Allotment plan. C-47 Crew Defies Weather To Evacuate Hurt Airman By SSgt. Hal Weil . On May 7 at 10 p.m., the base hospital received a call from H-2 site that A3C Leon J. Cattey had suffered an accident involving serious head injuries, and was un- conscious. This emergency call set off a chain of events that resulted in immediate liasion®' between hospital and Air Rescue personnel. Within an hour of the call, a C-47 piloted by Capt. James K. Carvey and Maj. Paul E. Coke, took off from Keflavik Airport with a medical team consisting of Capt. Herbert J. Smokier, TSgt Brenislaw S. Yuodis, A1C How- ard L. Stratton and a complete emergency kit for head surgery and oxygen equipment. An hour and 55 minutes later, the plane touched down at the landing strip, but it was nip and tuck as to whether a landing could be made at all since planes had not been able to land for a week, due to weather conditions. TSgt. Charles R. Redeman and A1C Harry O. Carey, medical technicians at the site, had al- ready transported the patient to the strip and were waiting when the plane landed. After examining the semi-con- scious patient, the medical team decided to air-evac him to Reykja- vik where an Icelandic neuro sur- geon had been alerted for possible brain surgery. The flight to Reykjavik took an hour and 40 minutes. Better time could have been made, but the patient's condition necessitat- ed a slow descent. At Reykjavik, the patient was taken immediately to St. Joseph's Hospital and placed under the care of Dr. Bjarni Jonsson. A consultation was held and it was decided to place the patient under observation. Since no noticeable improve- ment was made, Airman Cattey was airlifted to the United States on May 12 by regular air evacua- tion aircraft, diverted to Keflavik especially for this pick-up. He is now in St. Alban's Hospital, New York. Dr. Smokier said "This was a perfect example of a more than efficient air-evac operation which was carried out with dispatch and with the utmost cooperation and coordination between the Air Res- cue Service and the Aerospace Medicine Service." The U. S. Naval Station, Keflavik, will be commissioned on June 1, at which time the Naval Air Facility here will be decommissioned. During June the Naval Station will prepare for the assumption of host-service responsibility from the Air Force on July 1,^ while it also performs the func tions currently assigned to the Naval Air Facility. Announcement of the transition was made by Cdr. Paul T. Kiss- ling, commanding officer of the Naval Air Facility, Keflavik, at a joint Air Force-Navy Com- mander's Call last week. In at- tendance were Navy officers and chiefs as well as Air Force of- ficers and E-7's, 8's and 9's. Commander Kissling spoke for Capt. William R. Meyer, com- mander Naval Forces Iceland, who had planned to make the present- ation. "Our immediate aim is to ac- complish this transition as smoot- hly and as early as possible," Commander Kissling said, "so as to enable Air Force personnel to return to the U. S. without any unreasonable delays." It is expected that about 600 Air Force people will be required to staff the Air Force organiza- tions remaining in Iceland — the 57th Fighter Interceptor Squad- ron, 1971st AACS Squadron and the two H-sites. This require- ment is subject to continuous re- view, Commander Kissling stated, New Command Setup When the U. S. Naval Sta- tion, Keflavik, assumes host- service responsibility on July 1 command responsibilities will be as follows: , The commander of the Naval Forces Iceland will function as the naval component command- er under the Commander Ice- land Defense Force (COMICE- DEFOR). He will also be com- manding officer of the Naval Station with operational super- vision over the Army Port Team and the Navy Control Office. The Air Forces Iceland com- mander will be component com- mander under COMICEDEFOR for assigned Air Force units. He will be the principal advisor to COMICEDEFOR on all Air Force matters. MATS will continue to handle all uni-service Air Force mat- ters as at present. and may be altered somewhat. The full complement of the Naval Station will be comparable to the strength maintained here by the Air Force in the past. Close to half of the Navy en- listed allocation is expected to be on board by July 1, with substan- tial additional numbers reporting on or before Aug. 1. It is hoped that the total enlisted allocation will be filled by Jan. 1, 1962, Commander Kissling indicated. "If this phase-in follows sche- dule we should be able to prevent last-minute extensions of Air Force people whose presence might otherwise be necessary to ensure maintenance of essential operations," Commander Kissling said. "We expect, if this schedule is followed, that the Air Force will be reduced by attrition to its ten- ant strength sometime prior to July, 1962." "The input of Navy officers appears to be very satisfactory at this point in time," Commander Kissling said. "On July 1 we ex- pect to have at least a third of our officers aboard, with the bal- ance arriving within the six months following." Commander Kissling emphasiz- ed that he "purposely refrained from making any statements as to specific points in time that certain Air Force functions will be taken over lock, stock and bar- rel by the Navy," since actual turnover dates are dependent up- on logistical, administrative and financial considerations as well as manpower. However, Commander Kissling said, the overall target date is Oct. 1, 1961. "By that date all but few scattered operations should have been assumed by the Navy." Commander Kissling concluded his presentation by saying "many of you here today are to be com- mended for the excellent co-opera- tion extended to Navy officials in connection with this transfer." He said that Captain Meyer had asked him to report that "Many of these people have come to me personally to express their ap- preciation for your help, advice and assistance, which, I am sure, will do much toward insuring a smooth, orderly and swift transi- tion from the United States Air Force to Navy." U.S. AIR FORCE — AEROSPACE POWER FOR PEACE

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The White Falcon

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