The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 03.06.1961, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 03.06.1961, Blaðsíða 1
Help Save Gdld. Buy American. Buying Bonds Helps Save Gdld. Volume XI, Number 21 Headquarters, Air Forces Iceland, Keflavik Airport, Iceland—A MATS Unit Saturday, June 3, 1961 Navy Functions To Be Many, Varied Naval Station Executive Served At Pearl Harbor Cdr. Frank G. Vessell is sche- duled to report here on June 7 to become executive officer of the netvly commissioned U.S. Naval Station. Presently commanding officer of Airborne Early Warning Squadron Eleven (VW-11) at Argentia, Newfoundland, Com- mander Vessell entered the naval service in 1939 as an aviation cadet. He was on duty at Pearl Har- bor on Dec. 7, 1941, with VP-24, flying PBY's. He also participat- ed in the Battle of Midway and the New Georgia Campaign in the South Pacific. A graduate of the University of Minnesota, Commander Vessell holds a civil engineering degree and a master's degree in engin- eering electronics. He holds the Navy Commenda- tion ribbon, Asiatic-Pacific Cam- paign medal with three stars and the Command at Sea Insigne, as well as a number of other decora- tions. (Setup Similar With Differences q- Complex Task Required For 'Countdown' When Astronaut Alan B. Shep- ard Jr. made man's first venture into space under a partially pilot- controlled flight, a 12% hour countdown was required. Since the successful launching of a missile — especially when it carries a capsule bearing a man into space — is extremely compli- cated, safety is a primary concern of NASA officials. In laymen's terms, the count- down is simply a step-by-step process of getting the rocket ready to fire and making certain all the control and recording equipment is working properly. This requires hundreds of tests of delicate wiring, sensative mech- anism along with the replace- ment of any part casting the least (See Countdown, Page 3.) AF Academy Cadets Get Jump Training Air Force Academy cadets again will undergo airborne 'jump' training at the Army Infantry Center in Fort Benning, Ga. About 80 have volunteered this year for the three week course in paratrooper training that be- gins in mid-July. This marks the fourth year that Air Force cadets have und- ergone such training, the first group entering during 1958. Cdr. Vessell AFRS 'Mew Look* Appears Next Week Armed Forces Radio's "new look" will appear next week, with several new shows and different broadcast times for many favor- ites. Among the new programs are: Rhythm at Random, a half-hour deejay show weekdays at 8 p.m.; Saturday Morning Bandstand, 90 minutes of popular and western music each Saturday at 6 a.m.; and Music for the Middle Mind, a transcribed jazz show at 10 o'clock Saturday nights. In addition to new programs and time changes, there will be other new features which Kefla- vik Airport listeners will enjoy. It all begins tomorrow. Copies of the new radio sche- dule, plus the television program lineup, are available at the In formation Office, Building T-44. The reorganization of Keflavik Airport on July 1 as a Naval Station will result in many chang- es in functions and responsibili- ties—some of them quite unfam- iliar to Air Force people. Based on the staff-line concept, the U.S. Naval Station, Keflavik, will con sist of nine major operating de- partments plus the Commissary Store and Navy Exchange. Staff advisors will be Legal, Services Information, Chaplain, Air Safety and Comptroller. Naval Forces Iceland — the parent organizations of the Naval Station — will include an Office of Naval Intelligence unit (re- placing the Office of Special In- vestigations Detachment), the Naval Security Group, a Marine Detachment, the Naval Communi- cations Station, and the Fleet Weather Facility (replacing De- tachment 13 of the 9th Weather Group). The Navy Exchange which is tentatively scheduled to go into operation on Sept. 25 will take over present functions of the Ice- land Exchange. In addition it will be responsible for the NCO and Airmen's Clubs as well as laundry and dry cleaning. Staff Judge Advocate functions will be taken over by the Legal Office. The Services Information Of- fice, Chaplain and Air Safety Of- ficer will have functions compar- able to the similar Air Force activities. The Comptroller will assume present Air Force Comptroller functions, with the added respon- sibility — in conjunction with the Executive Officer — of manpower See Varied, Page 3.) Capt. Meyer Officer Relief Bill Is Indorsed By DOB Relief from the officer grade limitation act and flight accrual pay have been indorsed in pre- liminary form by the Department of Defense and sent to the Bureau of the Budget and the White House for coordination. DOD has approved a plan to provide additional lieutenant col- onels spaces to allow continuation of the temporary promotion pro- gram at field grade level which is threatened if no OGLA relief is forthcoming. Bureau of the Budget has the proposal. DOD has approved a plan to provide some measure of flight pay for rated personnel with 10 or more years of rated service, to those who might be removed from flying status through no fault of their own, and for the convenience of the government. Copter Stars In Joint 'Rescue' By SSgt. John W. Horky Air-ground rescue capabilities in Iceland were increased by a joint Icelandic and Defense Force practice mission conducted on May 21. The mission included the rescue of a 160-pound dummy named "George" from an elevation of 3,600 feet on Botnsulur, a moun- tain north of Thingvellir. A Keflavik Airport SH-19 heli- copter piloted by Capt. Robert R. Weber had dropped the dummy by a parachute from 1,200 feet above the summit of the moun- tain. After "George" was located by a 16-man mountain team the heli- copter returned to the mountain recovery point and made a rescue basket pickup of the dummy. At the conclusion of the exer- cise various techniques and rescue procedures were discussed with a view to standardization and closer coordination of future actual or practice rescue missions. While the Icelandic mountain team was climbing to the dummy the helicopter returned to the main encampment area for a fight demonstration and practice rescue hoist pickup. 1st Lt. David A. Jarratt as- sumed the duties of cabin master and hoist operator. A2C Jack E. Davis, the crew chief, was picked up in the "horse collar" attached to the hoist cable. The flight demonstration in- cluded hovering turns, sideward and backward flight and vertical takeoffs and landings. Several hundred people witnessed the de- monstration. About 55 Icelandic ground res- cue people were shown the equip- ment carried aboard the helicopter and briefed on the aircraft's capa- bilities. Mr. Sig. M. Thorsteins- son, director of the Icelandic ground rescue organization, was in charge of the party. The exercise was requested by Mr. B. Jonsson, director of the Icelandic CAA. He explained that he had heard numerous compli- ments on a flight-rescue demon- stration held early in May in con- junction with the Icelandic life- saving organization. Capt. Herbert R. Zehnder, chief of the rescue branch at Keflavik Airport, piloted the chopper on this mission in Reykjavik. Lieu- tenant Jarratt was co-pilot and TSgt. Donald B. Sanders the crew chief. C. O. Of Naval Station Was Hurricane Hunter Capt. William R. Meyer, com- mander of U. S. Naval Forces, Iceland, began wearing a "second hat" on June 1 when he assumed command of the U. S. Naval Sta- tion, Keflavik, which was com- missioned on that date. A 1940 graduate of the U. S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, Cap- tain Meyer received his wings in 1943. He participated in the develop- ment of typhoon reconnaissance in the Pacific in 1945. Later Cap- tain Meyer commanded Patrol Squadron Twenty-three (VP-2S) —the famed Navy hurricane hun- ters—at Miami, Fla. During this period he flew in more than 40 typhoons and hurricanes. Among other decorations Cap- tain Meyer holds the Asiatic-Pa- cific Campaign medal with four stars, the Presidential Unit Cita- tion with star and the Air Medal, as well as the Command at Sea Insigne. Units Donate Windows To Base Chapel The first stained glass window for the Keflavik Airport Chapel was unveiled Sunday, April 9, as a memorial to two pilots of the 57th Fighter Interceptor Squad- ron. The presentation of this window by members of the 57th sparked a program designed to provide stained glass windows for the entire Sanctuary. Chaplain, Lt. Col. Mark -W. Gress, Staff Chaplain, Head- quarters Air Forces Iceland and Headquarters Iceland Defense Force - NATO, announced Wed- nesday that a total of 15 windows including the one already instal- led by the 57th Fighter Squadron, have been sponsored by the fol- lowing organizations and indivi- duals: Naval Air Facility, VP-10, civilian personnel of the Civil En- gineering squadron, military per- sonnel of the Civil Engineering (See Windows, Page 3.) $ 50 Buty-free Gifts Out After June 30 The privilege of duty-free entry of gifts up to $50 in value will expire on June 30. On and after July 1 authorized users of APO's may send bona fide gifts not exceeding $10 in value free of duty. A customs declaration, POD form 2966, must be attached to the package. The procedure is outlined in par. 71, AFR 182-14. U.S. AIR FORCE — AEROSPACE POWER FOR PEACE

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The White Falcon

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