The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 10.06.1961, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 10.06.1961, Blaðsíða 1
Help Save Gdld. Buy American. Buying Bdnds Helps Save Gdld. Volume XI, Number 22 Headquarters, Air Forces Iceland, Keflavik Airport, Iceland—A MATS Unit Saturday, June 10, 1961 %vte4% PaMfaf There's heavy traffic on the lines of two telephones in Vir- ginia Beach, Va. One belongs to Cdr. Alan B. Shepard, America's first space- man, who resides here. He gets plenty of calls from well-wishers. The other belongs to Army Sgt. Billy J. Moore, stationed at Ft. Story, just outside Virginia Beach city limits. Moore is an admirer of Astronaut Shepard, but he is not too elated by the fact that his own phone number used to be the commander's and is still listed as such in the phone book. * * * "When the uses of nuclear en- ergy for rocket propulsion become feasible, man will control for the first time the energy needed to travel freely wherever he pleases in space," said Atomic Energy Commission Chairman Glenn T. Seaborg recently in a speech at San Francisco. "What is now science fiction may become scientific reality. On the basis of present scientific knowledge, I believe that nuclear propulsion could provide the most feasible means of accomplishing long voyages in space," he added. * * * The building of a new multi- purpose launch pad at the Navy Missile Facility at Port Arguello, Calif., has been announced by the Navy. The pad is designed to launch research rockets developing up to 150,000 pounds of thrust. The Navy has decided to cen- tralize launch operations because of the increased number of small rocket launchings. The new facility will be fin- ished in November and will be available to any range user for research projects. * * * The nation's railroads have ex- tended their reduced furlough rat- es for service people traveling in uniform at their own expence. The reduced round-trip fare, which dates from WWII and has continued ever since, was due to expire June 30, it was announced by Earl B. Padrick, chairman of the International Military Com- mittee. It will now remain in ef- fect until Dec. 31, 1961. * * * The Air Force has awarded $545,000 grant to the Medical Center of the University of Cali- fornia at Los Angeles for advanc- ed studies dealing with man's brain and nervous system during prolonged space flights. Air Force scientists reported a need for special studies on funda- mental brain mechanisms because the jet age has brought new stress and strain problems on the pilot. 'Western Troubadours' Are Named Champions In NATS Talent Hunt Keflavik Airport's Western Troubadours are the top Western entertainment group in the Military Air Trans- port Command. The trio was judged the best in the MATS- wide talent contest which was held at Dover AFB, Del. The group represented MATS in^ TIME TO CELEBRATE MSgt. Adelare Chevalier gives directions while MSgt. John H. Lucas wields the knife to cut a cake commemorating their retirement from active duty. Chevalier, who left Keflavik Tuesday retires June 30, and plans to live in Illinois, and Lucas leaves today and he will com- plete his master's degree in Vermont. He retires July 31. Eighth Graders Honored With Promotion Party At Gymnasium Members of the eighth grade class at Keflavik Airport Depen- dents School were honored last week with a promotion party held in the high school gymnasium. The main address of the even- ing was given by Lt. Danilo Medi- govich, base education officer, who spoke on, "The Pursuit of Excellence." James Fuller, class president, welcomed the parents and guests. Lora Jessup played two piano solos and Susan Thayer read Longfellow's "Psalm of Life." Mr. Wilburt Marich, class teacher, introduced the class who were presented diplomas by Char- les Muth, school superintendent. Miss Jessup, James Fuller, and Griffith Parry were named Honor Students by Mr. Muth for super- ior scholastic achievements, and were presented gifts by the Offi- cers Wives' Club. Susan Tuhoy, Mary Lou Davis, Lora Jessup, and James Fuller received recog- nition for outstanding citizenship. The class included Michael Burt, Mary Lou Davis, James Fuller, Thomas Gray, John Hav- erty, Lora Jessup, Norman Lilli- bridge, Gregory Papin, Griffith Parry, Walter Thaxton II, Susan Thayer, and Susan Tuhoy. A gift was presented from the class to Mr. Marich by Fuller, class president. The Invocation and Benediction were given by Chaplain Hugh V. Parry. A social hour followed the pro- gram with refreshments furnish- ed by the P.T.A. the world-wide Air Force contest which ended at Andrews AFB, Md., last night but as the White Falcon went to press, we had no results of the finals. The group is composed of SSgt. Alvin B. Koscheski, 1971st AACS Sq., A1C William E. Balton, Det. 6, 7th Air Postal Sq., and A2C Thomas R. Windsor, 1971st. Final standings saw Orlando AFB, Fla., sweep into first place while Keflavik was able to cop fifth place. Other teams entered and their standings include Mc- Guire, second; Charleston and Travis tied for third place; Scott, sixth; Dover, seventh; Kindley, Bermuda, eighth; and Lajes, ninth. The Ambassadors of Dover won first place in the vocal group; WAF vocalist winner was A1C Mary Hunt, Charleston; male vocalist, A1C Raymond Detiege, Travis; musical instrument group, Hal Charles Quartet, Charleston; dancing solo, A2C Lita Allison, McGuire; instrumentalist, SSgt. John Murat, Orlando; western solo, A3C Philip Esser, Travis; novelty act, A3C Judy Green and A1C Michael Babyak, McGuire; specialty act, SSgt. Millard Webb, Murat, and A2C Don Feagan, Or- lando; and master of ceremonies, Webb. Lieutenant Willis Short Story Contest Winners Announced "When a Latin Loves" by 1st Lt. Danilo B. Medigovich won the first prize of $30 in the short story contest here. Lt. Col. James A. Whitt's entry, "Why John Came," placed second for the $20 prize and Capt. Keith M. Bratton's story, "Joe," third for $15. "A Day to Remember" by Capt. Arnold R. Baum received honor- able mention. The stories have been forward- ed for consideration in the MATS and USAF contests. Judges in the local contest were Mmes. James Butler, Elnan Mc- Mullen and John C. Price. Peggy Jessup Is Honor Student Commencement for the Depend- ents' High School class of 1961 was held in the Viking Service Club. Students who received dip- lomas were Judith Bennett, Mar- garet Clark, Paola Clark, Michael Cook, Margaret Jessup, Audur Kluck, Jerry Miller, Hugh Reyn- olds, and Gene Schurr. The address of the evening was given by Col. Benjamin G. Willis whose theme was, "A Measure of Success." Peggy Jessup was named Honor Student of the class and received a $500 scholarship from the Uni- versity of Oregon, and a $50 scholarship from the Officers Wives' Club. Presentation was made by Lt. Danilo Medigovich, base education officer. Charles Muth, school superin- tendent, presented the class. Maj. H. C. Jessup, president of the School Board, presented diplomas. Mr. Patrick Johnson, high school teacher, sang two solos. His accompanist was A1C Boat- wright. The high school girls' chorus under the direction of Miss Sandra Mahlum, music teacher, sang, "You'll Never Walk Alone." The Invocation and Benediction were given by Chaplain L. M. Nielsen. Col. Willis'Son Graduates from Air Force Academy Benjamin Grant Willis, Jr., 21, son of Colonel B. G. Willis, pre- sently commander of Iceland De- fense Force, graduated Wednes- day . from the United States Air Force Academy. At com- mencement exercises, he received a bachelor of science degree and was commissioned a second lieu- tenant in the Regular U. S. Air Force, with the wings of an aerial navigator. Prior to his commissioning, Willis has held the position of cadet squadron supply officer. A 1957 graduate of Phillips Aca- demy, Andover, Mass., before win- ning his appointment to the Air Force Academy, he was a member of the National French Honor Society, played tennis, squash, was a three year letterman in soccer, participated in wrestling and swimming, and was manager of the Phillips track team. While completing the stringent academ- ic demands of the Air Force Aca- demy, Willis has been active in cadet extra-curricular functions such as Choir, Glee Club, Dance Committee, Radio Club, Ski Club, Hunting Club, and has been a staff member of The Talon—the cadet newsmagazine. His first as- signment after graduation will be as a navigator with the Air Force's global deterrent counter- forces. The Air Force Academy, near Colorado Springs, has a carefully balanced four-year curriculum de- signed to educate, train and moti- vate young men for lifetime car- eers as Air Force Officers. It is neither a scientific nor liberal arts program, but a combination of both. U.S. AIR FORCE — AEROSPACE POWER FOR PEACE

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