The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 10.06.1961, Blaðsíða 2

The White Falcon - 10.06.1961, Blaðsíða 2
WHITE FALCON Saturday, June 10, 1961 Future Of Capeharts Up Before Congress The future of the Capehart housing program, for the armed forces will be weighed soon by conferees from both houses of Congress meeting as a conference committee. The House Armed Services* Committee authorized in Febru- ary 7,074 Capehart units for all three military departments dur- ing fiscal year 1962. It also ex- tended the presently expiring Capehart housing law one year and raised the Capehart ceiling from 25,000 units to 37,000. The Senate Armed Services Committee ruled against the en- tire Capehart request, cutting it from the bill known as H. R. Attache Openings Now Available To NCO's, Officers From staff sergeant through colonel there are continuing re- quirements to keep the air at- tache system manned at U. S. em- bassies and legations in nearly 60 capital cities of the world. Making the announcement, Hq. USAF officials said that most air attache stations require a langu- age capability, but that normal scheduling provides for language training for otherwise qualified personnel. "Normally pilots on uncondi- tional flight status are required but there are stations where pil- ots with over 20 years rated ser- vice who are excused from flying, and non-rated officers, can be utilized," the announcement said. "Only those individuals with records indicating unusually high manner of performance, outstand- ing professional knowledge, and demonstrated tact and diplomacy and impeccable personal character will be selected." If you are qualified, officials said you should check out a pos» sible assignment with the air at- tache system. ¦ m ¦ B-52H Operational At Wurtsmith AFB The first B-52H bomber assign- ed to an operational unit has ar- rived at Strategic Air Command's 379th Wing based at Wurtsmith AFB, Mich. The "H" model of the B-52 Stratofortress is modified to car- ry advanced weapon systems such as Hound Dog and Skybolt mis- siles. Turbofan engines are another "H" improvement, giving about 30 per cent more take-off and climbing power than on earlier models plus added range. - Its ability to pose a missile launching threat and yet be sub- ject to recall action is regarded as an important advantage over the straight missile. "The B-52H represents the most flexible deterrent found in this country today," said Gen. Thomas S. Power, SAC command- 5000 and substituting a lesser amount — 2,000 units — of ap- propriated fund housing. Now the two committees will send representatives to meet in joint conference committee S3S- sion to determine how these dif- ferences can be resolved. In approving the Capehart housing request from the Depart- ment of Defense, the House group said, "It is apparent to the com- mittee that no significant reduc- tion in the number of sub-stand- ard housing units will be achieved until adequate public quarters are made available in sufficient quan- tity to replace such sub-standard units. "Consequently, the committee accepted the minimum recom- mendation of the Department of Defense and authorized the 7,074 units determined by the Depart- ment as essential to meet the high priority housing requirements of the individual services." In deleting Capehart housing from the Department of Defense construction bill, the Senate said, "During the past several years the Congress and the Executive Branch have tried several ap- proaches to meet the housing re- quirements of the military. None of these, in the final analysis, has proved adequate from the standpoint of economy. "Both Wherry and Capehart housing have been costly pro- grams, although admittedly they have served a purpose. The com- mittee believes that the time has come when serious consideration has to be given to abandoning the present approach and steps taken to meet this problem through the regular annual authorization and appropriations process." Capehart housing is financed through commercial firms by the rental allowances of military per- sonnel. Appropriated fund housing is financed by monies obtained by Congressional authorization and appropriation. Proponents of Capehart housing say this plan results in more houses for military families and ¦does not require Congress to ap- propriate money. Family housing is part of the overall military construction bill that totalled $942,059,000 for all cervices as requested by President Kennedy Mar. 28. Strength Is Up Total Air Force active duty strength increased slightly from March to April from 820,307 to 821,200, preliminary Defense De- partment statistic reveal. Total armed services manpower for the same period was down to 2,482,331 from 2,489,865, because of slight losses in Navy and Army personnel. THE WHITE FALCON Col. Benjamin G. Willis, USAF Commander, Air Forces Iceland The WHITS FALCON l« an official Clan 77 Armed Vane* nevepaper publiehed weeklu at Ke.flavix Airport, Iceland by Air ranee Iceland of the Military Air Tranevort Service tor all contingents etationed at Keflavtk Airport. The WHITE FALCON reoeivet AFl'B and AFN8 material*. View* and opinion* exprened herein are not neceeearilv those of the Department of Defen*e. Editor .......................... People Overseas Enthusiastic In Saving Gold Assistant Secretary of the Air Force Lyle S. Garlock has re- ported to Defense Secretary Ro- bert S. McNamara that "Air Force personnel overseas general- ly have responded enthusiastically to the program for increasing personal savings and reducing ex- penditure for foreign goods." He noted, however, that because of the newness of the campaign, "it is not possible to determine the magnitude of savings in dollar outflow at this time." As of Apr. 30, all commands report a reduction of $7,010,000 in appropriated spending and $19,- 393,626 in nonappropriated spend- ing. Moreover, the projected re- duction for calendar year 1961 to- talled $28,145,000 in appropriated funds and $53,020,549 in nonap- propriated funds. A further pro- jection into calendar 1962 puts appropriated overseas savings at $28,145,000 and nonappropriated savings at $64,299,875. In announcing a voluntary pro- gram of overseas spending curbs to halt the adverse dollar flow, the Department set in early March a target of $75 to $110 million a year. Secretary McNamara asked that all military members, civil- ian employes and their depend- ents voluntarily restrict their spending abroad on foreign goods and services at the rate of $75 to $110 annually per capita. Since that time overseas com- mands have launched various pro- grams of voluntary savings through Airmen's Deposits and U. S. Savings Bonds. The com- mands themselves effected other economies. In line with the original DOD directive on overseas spending curbs, an effectiveness report is scheduled for July 1 with a fol- low-up survey coming every six months thereafter. ............... TSgt Wylie Mason, USAF tutoldirprvntmloli h.t. Kickam Wing Wins AF Safety Award The 1502nd Air Transport Wing at Hickam AFB, Hawaii, has been awarded the Air Force Outstand- ing Unit Award for its safety awareness and professional abil- ity, MATS Personnel officials have announced. The wing was given the award for its exceptionally meritorious service from July 1, 1959 through June 30, 1960 by providing pas- senger transportation, air evacua- tion, maintenance service and ter- minal facilities throughout the Pacific area. The recommendation for the award, which was forwarded to USAF headquarters, read in part. .. "During this period, this or- ganization demonstrated its safe- ty awareness and professional ability by achieving a remarkable accident-free record of more than 50,000 flying hours while main- taining an outstanding schedule reliability rate ...." The 1502nd has logged more than 300,000 accident-free flying hours since its last accident in June, 1956. It is commanded by Col. David E. Daniel. This award is given by the Air Force periodically to units up through wing level for exceptional achievements in peacetime opera- tions. Academy Graduates Prefer Pilot Training With the pomp and circumstance of "June Week" be- hind them, 217 new second lieutenants are now adjusting their horizons beyond the Air Force Academy at Colorado Springs and 180 of them have de-^ cided to enter pilot training this summer. Fifteen former cadets are slat- ed for navigator duty with opera- tional units and one is scheduled for advanced navigation training. Nine of the new lieutenants have been accepted for graduate study in astronautics, propulsion, electrical, aeronautical, nuclear and civil engineering and will at- tend such well known institutions as Massachusetts Institute of Technology, California Institute of Technology, Princeton Univer- sity, The University of Southern California, North Carolina State and the Air Force Institute of Technology at Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio. Of the 217 U. S. Air Force Mavy Flyers Streak To Speed Record Three Navy McDonnell Phan- tom II jet planes streaked coast- to-coast and all three cracked the old trans-continental speed record of three hours seven minutes and 44 seconds. The winning team — Lt. Rich- ard F. Gordon Jr., and Lt. (jg) Bobbie R. Young, both of NAS Miramar, Calif., smashed the pre- vious mark by 20 minutes, 27 sec- onds with a recorded time of two hours, 47 minutes and 17 seconds. Ironically, the winning team landed last. Taking off at 15- minute intervals from Ontario, Calif., near Los Angeles, the planes covered a course of 2,445.9 miles. The third-place-winners — Cdr. Julian S. Lakes', pilot, and Lt. Thomas J. Johnson, radar- interceptor officer, both of NAS Oceania, Va., landed first with a time of three hours, three minut- es. For a brief period, the new trans-continental record was theirs. Just seven minutes later, how- ever, the record changed hands when the second-place winners touched their aircraft down. Crew- ed by Lt. Cdr. L. Scott Lamore- aux, pilot, and his assistant, Lt. (jg) Elwood A. Cowart, they be- came the new record-holders but again, only for a short time. When the winning crew's wheels finally touched the landing strip, they shaved nine minutes, 43 sec- onds off their nearest competi- tors' time, and for the third time in 14 minutes, the trans-contin- ental records became the property of new owners — Lt. Gordon and Lt. (jg) Young. The top-crew flew most of the way at about 50,000 feet. They used the afterburners on their twin-jet engines to attain maxi- mum speed of more than 1,300 m.p.h. Since the afterburners consume fuel twice as fast as normal cruis- ing, the jet had to descend three times to 30,000 feet and reduce speed to 530-630 m.p.h. to refuel in mid-air. The race for the coveted trophy, a flight sculpture, put up since 1931 by the Bendix Corp., was confined this year by invitation to Navy jets. Since 1951 the only contestants have been military jets. Academy graduates this year, 213 were commissioned regular second lieutenants, received aerial navig- ator's wings, and were awarded the bachelor of science degree. Two academy graduates have elected to enter the Marine Corps and two will be commissioned in the Army. California had the largest num- ber of graduates with 18. New York had 17 graduates followed by 12 from Ohio, 11 from Indiana and 10 each from Texas and Vir- ginia. States not having graduates ¦were Idaho, Montana, Nebraska and Vermont. One graduate came from Iran. Three graduates list overseas APOs as their home address. One new USAF second lieutenant, Gor- don M. Clarke, is the son of Gen. Bruce C. Clarke, currently Com- mander in Chief of United States Army forces in Europe (USAR- EUR). Secretary of the Air Force Eugene M. Zuckert was the com- mencement speaker. * "June Week" also was filled with a number of parades, cere- monies and other special events. The climax came the morning of June 7 when the cadets released their pent-up emotions on gradua- tion by throwing their caps into the air in unison. And the Academy chaplain re- ported that another service tradi- tion — an Academy marriage fol- lowing graduation — is being up- reld by several new second lieu- tenants and their fiancees. CSC Examines Its Operations The Civil Service Commission announces that it "is reexamining its regulations, instructions, and standards to assure full compli- ance with Presidential policy and intent that career employment practices be maintained without discrimination and with equal op- portunity." In a letter sent to more than 60 agency heads, Civil Service Commission Chairman John W. Macy Jr. said the commission would soon issue instructions to its agencies on this subject. Principal changes will revolve around procedures to insure that members of minority groups are selected for emplovment and pro- moted as their abilities warrant. Five Generals Named The President announced that Maj. Gen. Frank A. Bogart and Maj. Gen. Howell M. Estes Jr. had been promoted to the tempor- arv grade of lieutenant general. General Bogart is the comn- troller of the Air Force. General Estes is deputy commander, Air Force Svstems Command for aero- space systems (AFSC). The President also announced the temporary promotion to brisra- dier general of Col. Harold W. Ohlke, commander 18th Air Div., Col. Don S. Wenger, chief pro- fessional consultant to the sur- geon general, USAF, and Col. Samuel C. Phillips, director, Min- uteman systems program, AFSC, Inglewood, Calif.

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The White Falcon

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