The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 10.06.1961, Blaðsíða 3

The White Falcon - 10.06.1961, Blaðsíða 3
Saturday, June 10, 1961 WHITE FALCON AFNR 66 Features Long Pass, Other Air Force Events Air Force News Review #66 features a joint Army-Air Force training exercise, Long Pass. In- volved in this exercise are ele- ments of Strategic Army Corps, a Composite Air Strike Force from TAC and men and aircraft from MATS Global Airlift Force. Some 1,300 combat troops and 1,000 tons of equipment are moved from the U. S. and Hawaii to Clark AFB in the Philippines. Reservists of the 403d Trans- port Wing at Selfridge AFB de- monstrate their readiness to do a job on short notice when they are activated for a short tour to bring a group of 40 C-119s back to the U. S. from Dreux Air Base near Paris. Other items include — Fort Walton Beach Has Own F-102; First T-38 Talon Joins ATC; ATC Notches AF Cage Crown; Airmen Launch Blue Scout.Run- ning time is 14 minutes. The Feature Film Brief "Sec- onds for Survival," running time 28 minutes, shows how the United States Air Force maintains a con- stant state of combat readiness in all theaters on a round-the- clock basis. Raymond Massey describes the NORAD-SAC Alert System and USAF Operational Readiness. , RECEIVES SCHOLARSHIP Peggy Jessup was named Honor Student of the 1961 graduates at Keflavik and received a $500 scholarship from the University of Oregon, and a $50 one from the Officers Wives Club. Lt. Danilo Medigovich made the presentation. Commander Shepard Is First To File 'First Pilot Report' U.S. Astronaut Alan B. Shep- ard's historic suborbital flight aboard the Mercury capsule Free- Olafur t. Hannesson skrifar um: Hitt 9$ jtetta Eins og kunnugt er, rekur varn- arliSiS radarstoSvar her a landi utan Keflavikurflugvallar. Eg hafSi pa anaegju fyrir skommu aS heimsa?kja radarstbSvarnar a Straumnesfjalli og Stokksnesi. Samgongur viS Straumnesfjall eru afar erfiSar a veturna. StoSin er staSsett yzt a f jallsbrun. Fari6 er a bati fra IsafirSi til bessarar afskekktu stoSvar me5 viflkomu i Adalvik, sem er litiS, yfirgefieS sjavarborp, tildraS niSur i vik og umkringt hrikalegum f jollum. Fra ASalvik er siSan fariS meS sleSa, sem fest er i velytu. Sioasti spol- urinn fra ASalvik til stoSvarinn- ar liggur eftir mjoum, bugdottum troSningi upp fjalliS. Ekki pykir tiltokumal pott tro5ningur bessi se tiSum tepptur aS vetrarlagi sakir snjoa, svo ad jafnvel velytan fser ekki brotizt gegnum fimbul- snaevi betta. Sjalft ferSalagid tek- ur um paS bil 1% klst. Ellefu fslendingar vinna mi viS stoSina, en starfi beirra mun bratt ljiika, bar eS ratsjarstoSin hefir veri5 logS ni6ur. Svo aS viki5 se ad Keflavikur- flugvelli skal bess getiS aS ymsar breytingar hafa att ser stad hvaS starfsfolk snertir. Til aS mynda hefir Ruben Peter- sen verid radinn yfirmatreiSslu- ma5ur a veitingastofunni a flug- vallarhotelinu. Pa. hefir forvald- ur Stefansson veriS raSinn verk- stjori i bvottahusinu og FriSrik G. Johannsson framkvamidastjori i motuneyti liSsforingja. Bjarni Kristjansson, velaverkfrseSingur, hefir veriS raSinn til starfa hja verkfra?8ideildinni, og SigriSur Sigurbjarnadottir, skrifstofumaef hja launautreikningadeild. Samkv»mt upplysingum fra launaiitreikningadeildinni ver5ur gjaldkeri deildarinnar framvegis viS fra kl. 8:30 til 12:00 og 13:00 til 15:30 fra manudegi til fostu- dags, a laugardogum fra kl. 9:30 til 12:00 a hadegi. It is well known that the De- fense Force operates radar sta- tions off base in this country. I was fortunate enough a short time ago to visit the radar sta- tions on Straumnesfjall and at Stokksnes. Communications with Straumnesfjall are quite difficult during the winter months. The station is located on the very brink of a mountain ridge. The journey from Isafjordur to this remote site is made by a boat, which takes one to Adalvik, a small seashore village ensconced in a small inlet, surrounded by jagged mountains. There one em- barks a sleigh which is hitched to a bulldozer. This last stretch from Adalvik to the site leads up to a narrow, winding trail up the mountain. Needless to say this trail is frequently blocked in the winter time by snow, so that even the bulldozer cannot break through this white barrier. The trip itself up the mountain takes about an hour and a half. Back to the base where several changes of personnel have occur- red. Thus Ruben Petersen has been promoted to chief cook in the Terminal Restaurant. Thor- valdur Stefansson has been pro- moted to foreman in the Base Laundry and Fridrik Johannsson has now become Manager of the Officers' Field Ration Dining Hall. Bjarni Kristjansson, mechani- cal engineer, has been hired by CERON, and Sigridur Sigurbjar- nardottir, clerk, was recently en- gaged by the Civilian Payroll Of- fice. According to information from Civilian Payroll the cashier of the section will be in from 8:30 a.m. till 12:00' noon and from 1:00 p.m. till 3:30 p.m. Monday through Friday and Saturday from 9:30 a.m. till 12:00 noon. dom 7 brought another first to the annals of U. S. Air Force weathermen. Shepard's comments on cloud cover over the Eastern Seaboard within three minutes after takeoff on the historic 15- minute flight permitted the US- AF Air Weather Service to file the world's first pilot report (PI- REP) from space. Before the astronaut landed the 2nd Weather Group at Langley AFB, Va., had sent out Shep- ard's remarks from space as a pilot report. The message read, "East of Cocoa, Fla., at 9:37 a.m. (Eastern Standard Time): on top, three-eights cloud coverage, Co- coa, Fla., to Cape Hatteras, N.C., Mercury capsule." Fed in weather code into USAF weather teletype circuits, Shep- ard's historic pilot report read: "LFI (for Langley) 1445Z PIR- EP E COF 1437Z OTP % CLD COVERAGE COF _ HAT MER- CURY CAP." Within minutes, AWS weather- men throughout the United States had their first space pilot's report as an added bit of data for use in forecasting the nation's weath- er for Air Force and Army activi- ties. Pensacola Base Boasts Interesting Trio: Ghosts Pensacola NAS, Fla. (AFPS) — The Navy, with its super-carrier task forces, its guided missile destroyers and deadly nuclear submarines, may have entered the space age with a bristling roar of strength, but ghosts of the past still persist—and at Pensa-*1 cola tradition has it that the ghosts are blithe, unruly spirits indeed, There are three spirits in all, according to NAS annals, and two of them haunt the "Quarters A" residence of Vice Adm. Robert Goldwaite, Chief of Naval Air Training. This large, impressive building, built for a Navy com- mandant in 1874, has since under- Navy Contracts For Communications And Radar Systems The Navy has awarded a $1,001,- 108 contract for airborne radar systems to Texas Instruments, Inc., Dallas, Texas. The radar, designated AN/APS- 88, will be installed aboard car- rier-based patrol planes. Lighter and more compact than previous similar systems, the AN/APS-88 will be used for antisubmarine warfare, weather warning and general purpose search. It includes a plan position indi- cator which provides a vliual dis- play of targets, sonobuoy beacon replies, and IFF (identification- friend or foe) replies. The radar can also be used to map the extent of storm fronts and to detect ter- rain features such as mountains, islands, and coast lines. The Navy has also awarded two contracts to Collins Radio Com- pany, Dallas, Texas, one for de- livery of communication, naviga- tion and identification (CNI) systems for use aboard jet air- craft, and one for ground support equipment for the CNI systems. The CNI systems contract is for $1,500,000 and the grounds support equipment contract is for $640,679. The CNI system provides the pilot with ultra-high frequency radio communication, electronic navigation aids, and equipment for identifying the plane to friend- ly tactical control units. CNI systems will be used aboard the Navy's F4H-1 PHANTOM II fighter, the A3J VIGILANTE attack bomber, and the A2F IN- TRUDER low-level attack bomb- er. gone periodic alterations, but no amount of modernization could, it seems, banish a spectral party known as "the Colonel" or his faceless "Lady in White." In the last century, when dreaded yellow fever epidemics struck the area, it was custom- ary on the base to cut off con- tact with the surroundng ciount- ryside, since little help could be given. The Navy Yard's com- mandant during one of these outbreaks, took this preventive isolation' with high seriousness. "Colonel," as he was nick- named, ran the yard from the small cupola above the big house, having all his meals raised and lowered to him in a basket with a bottle of rum to ward off the fever. But one black day his faithful servant forgot the rum. It was then that the "Colonel" had a premonition of death. Sure enough, in another week the fev- er had claimed him. But, says lo- cal legend, his ghost still walks in "Quarters," as does the spirit of a lovely lady who occupied a ground floor room in the house at the time. Always clad in white, she is said to materalize with a scarf over her head — for face she has none. Add to this interesting couple a more modern revenant, a Capt. Guy Hall who frequents an octa- gonal building on the base which in the 1920's served as an offi- cer's club. Nightly it was the scene of heavy poker games in which the catpain was a go-for-broke play- er. One of his more annoying habits is said to have been drop- ping a stack of poker chips, one by one, on the table top. Capt. Hall was killed in a plane crash, old Pensacola hands re- member, but at Bldg. 16 his spirit still drops in to kibitz and rattle poker chips. Harmless enough — but it unnerved the dog of an admiral formerly stationed here. At night the chips would rattle eerily from within the silent old building; the airedale would growl and bark back fiercely, and peo- ple in the vicinity would toss on their pillows and vow that be- tween ghosts and dogs, ghosts were the most. THE YOUNGEST GRADUATES Ten members of the Keflavik Airport Nursery School grdauated here May 31, to become the first group of children in the nursery school to undergo graduation ceremonies. Certificates were presented by their teacher, Jane Gray, and refreshments were served to children, parents and guests at the affair. From left to right the yonngsters are Nancy Fuller, Eggert Nielsen, Johanna Heezel, Shirley Morey, David Zartman, Greta Heezel, Mark Franklin, Kellie Watkins, and Kevin Trimble.

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The White Falcon

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