The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 10.06.1961, Blaðsíða 4

The White Falcon - 10.06.1961, Blaðsíða 4
WHITE FALCON Saturday, June 10, 1961 AH Still Leads Softball League With 4-0 Record Headquarters AFI continued its torrid pace in the intramural soft- ball race this week, winning three more games to lead the pack with a 4-0 record. Along the way AFI has count- ered for 44 runs, while allowing their opposition only 6. Two other teams are also show- ing a zero-loss record, hanging on to a tie for second place. They are the 57th Fighters and AACS. Supply and NAF have won two and lost one, while Naval Secur- ity, Rockville, and Hospital have won one and. lost two. The four remaining teams have yet to hit the win trail. These include Transportation, Civil En- gineers, and Weather with zero and two, and Transportation with zero-three. Getting the season underway, AFI dropped Weather to the tune of 10v0 with Nick Popovich tos- sing a no-hitter at the 'casters. AFI then got to Hospital 14-1, edged Rockville 6-3, and rounded it out 14-2 over Naval Security. 57th Fighters beat NSG 4-0, NAF 3-2, and Engineers 10-0, while AACS was tripping AB Sq 3-2, Weather 8-4, and Rockville 12-3. (Answers to Quiz) 1. Babe Ruth swatted the first homer in Yankee Stadium on April 8, 1923. 2. Fred Hass Jr. was a member of the Walker Cup team in 1938 and played for the Ryder Cup team in 1953. 3. Red Auerback of the Boston Celtics. 4. The first World Series game was played Oct. 1, 1903 when the Pittsburgh Pirates defeated the Boston Red Sox, 7-3. 5. Lloyd Waner of the Pitts- burgh Pirates in 1927. Airmen Complete Loading Course Eight MATS loadmasters and two air freight specialists will introduce jet cargo loading pro- cedures aboard the first Boeing C-135 "Stratofreighters" at Mc- Guire AFB, N. J. this month. The ten EASTAF men have completed the jet loadmaster course at Castle AFB, Calif. The week-long course is based on cur- rent available KC-135 data. According to MATS Personnel training officials, a quota for four additional MATS men and two Air Training Command instruc- tors has been scheduled for the loadmaster course in July. Lieutenant Colonel List Is Announced Hq. USAF has sent to all major commands a list of 1,617 officers selected for promotion to per- manent lieutenant colonel in the Regular Air Force. "This announcement does not constitute the actual promotion of the officers concerned, such pro- motions to be made on a specifical- ly designated date after confirma- tion by the Senate," Hq. USAF cautioned. One thousand, five hundred and twenty-six line of the Air Force officers were selected, 267 defer- red for the first time and 113 deferred for the second. Ninety-one were selected in the various components with only two deferrals, both for the second time. BADMINTON CHAMPS NAMED Ben Arietta, a civilian employe in ABS, won first place in the singles event of the recent badminton tournament. Doubles was won by Russell Mowry and Nes Hansen of VP-10, after a hard fought battle with Air Force team Jack Snyder and Steve Lackey, Hq AFI. Runner- up in the singles was Mowery and Snyder and Lackey were runners- up in the doubles. Modern Pentathlon Requires Varied Military-related Skills, Prowess A few weeks back 25 military athletes from the United States, Mexico, Brazil and Argentina stood at attention under sunny Texas skies at Fort Sam Houston. They were marking the ceremon- ial end of five days of intense and varied competitions that go back in history to the ancient Greeks. The event was the international trials of the modern pentathlon, a warm-up for the world's champ- ionship competition scheduled to be held at Moscow in August. Of the 25 military competitors, one was an Air Force man, Air- man David Kirkwood, who finish- ed a creditable fifth in the over- all standing. Airman Kirkwood and his col- leagues had treated 10,000 spec- tators at San Antonio to a rare display of athletic skills. These were no sporting special- ists who can do only one thing well. Instead, they pitted their skills against world standards in five diverse events: riding a stee- ple-chase horserace over a 5,000- meter course; fencing with the epee; shooting a pistol at a bob- bing target 25 meters away; swimming free-style for 300 met- ers; and running cross country over a 4,000-meter course. These five events took place on five consecutive days. Each re- quired different athletic skills and muscle power. Each was scored by stiff standards. For example, the 400-meter or 2% mile run is Sports Quiz By AFPS 1. What famous baseball play- er hit the first home run in Yank- ee Stadium? 2. Name the only golfer to represent the United States in in- ternational competition as both amateur and professional. 3. Who is the only remaining National Basketball Assn. coach still active of the original 11 who opened the 1946-47 season? 4. In what year was the first World Series baseball tilt played? 5. Only one rookie in the ma- jor leagues has ever got 223 hits in a single season. Can you name him? given full marks only when the time of 15 minutes flat is record- ed, a not bad time for specialists. Other events were gauged by sim- ilar stringent standards. The rarity of such sporting pro- wess is obvious. It was obvious in 708 B. C. when the Spartans' complaint that Olympic competi- tions were too specialized and did not truly measure athletic skill was recognized and the first pen- tathlon held. In those days, the first event was a broad-jumping contest. The. second a javelin throw, the third a foot race, the fourth a discus throw, and the fifth a wrestling match to determine the champion. Such events represented, of course, the needed soldierly skills of that ancient era. Riding, fencing, shooting, swim- ming and running in the modern day pentathlon represent the mili- tary skills deemed worthy in 1912 when the pentathlon again was introduced into Olympic competi- tion. One of the early American com- petitors in 1912 was a young American lieutenant named Ge- orge Patton. Through the years, at least two German and two Swedish pentathlon athletes be- came general officers of note. That the pentathlon requires skills and coordination not found in any other sport is an under- statement. That it is a soldier's sport is obvious. That Americans have never won an individual championship at international ev- ents needs correction. The American servicemen com- peting are showing their stuff to try for places on the United States team for the coming Moscow world's championship. For those who have pentathlon aspirations, the experts say here is a handy rule of thumb to judge your potential — possession of high skills in three of the five events, two of these including run- ning and swimming. It's presumed that you have the reflexes to be- come a fencer and the steady hands to become a shooter. How does such a man look? The experts say that with a few exceptions he is on the slim side, weighing about 175 pounds so as not to handicap his riding. Above all he is a true Spartan about being able to work long and hard hours training for all these skills. f By AFPS * Milwaukee Braves' baseball scout Jody Johnson has asked B. J. Banks of the Army's 1st Cav. Div. in Korea to play for the Mexico City Tigers in the AA Mexican League. Banks is a former member of the Braves' farm system and swatted a mighty .340 when he played for Ft. Monmouth, N.J., in 1959 .... Capt. Michael McNamara, Air Force Academy assistant diamond mentor for the past four years, is now flying F-100 Super Sabre jets at Myrtle Beach AFB, S. C..... Despite the fact that Bill Nieder, former Presidio of San Francisco athlete, was knocked out in the first round of his -pro debut, he still plans on continuing a prizefighting career .... West Point's Gerry Garwick set an Academy 440-yard run record by covering the quarter- mile distance in 47.7 .... Joe Eulberg, representing the Sixth Naval District, became the South Atlantic Regional bowling champion by rolling a total pin count of 3,427 for 18 games to finish with a 190 average .... Jack Douglas of MCRD San Diego, Calif., has been selected for the U. S. Davis Cup tennis team. DOUBLE WINNER—All American halfback Joe Bellino became the first Naval Academy athlete since 1919 to win Navy's two top athletic awards—the Thompson trophy and the Naval Academy Athletic Assn. Award .... Jack McCarten, formerly of Ft. Carson, Colo., and one time top goalie with the N.Y. Rangers, is slated to return to the pro league next season .... George Izo, famus for his quarterbacking of Notre Dame and the St. Louis Cardinals, will soon complete his six-month training stint at Ft. Leonard Wood, Mo..... Three-time All America West Point fullback Felix "Doc" Blanchard, is now an Air Force major .... George Welsh, the quarterback who piloted the Midshipmen in '54 and '55, will be back at the Naval Academy this fall to help with the Middies' backfield coaching chores .... Southpaw hurler Howard Diggers of Ft. Carson, Colo., former ace at Southern Illinois College, recorded the first no-hit tilt at Carson this year. Diggers has received bids from the St. Louis Cardinals, Cleveland Indians and the Pittburgh Pirates .... The National AAU Senior long distance running competition will be held at San Diego Sept. 2. QUOTE OF THE WEEK—Paul Richards, Baltimore Orioles man- ager: "We have to stick close to the Yankees, Indians and White Sox. If we do that kind of a job, we should be knocking at the door before the 162 games are played." Academy Falcons Are Busy Birds Since all varsity teams at the Air Force Academy are known as "Falcons," and since there are 15 intercollegiate sports that boast varsity squads, varsity sports around Pike's Peak is of the birds, by the birds, but, to the credit of the new school, not for the birds. While having no conference af- filiation, the football Falcons have established a national reputation in the few years of existence. Such teams as the 1958 football squad, which completed an unde- feated season and played Texas Christian University to a score-_ less tie in the Cotton Bowl, have served notice that the newest of the service academies produces athletes on a par with any school in the country. Expansion of the Falcon foot ball schedule to include opponents of national ranking made the need for a home stadium obvious. Since football is the only income-pro- ducing sport, a stadium is a vital necessity at the Academy and will provide financial support for a major portion of the AFA's 15- sport athletic program. Excavation and earth-moving operations are now complete on $3,500,000 Falcon Stadium, funds for which are being raised through a world-wide campaign conducted by the Air Force Academy Foun- dation, Inc. The foundation is a non-profit nationwide organization of prom- inent businessmen and civic lead- ers which has undertaken the task of providing for the Academy needed facilities which cannot be financed with government funds. The 40,000-seat stadium is sche- duled to be ready for the 1962 season. Air Force members donated more than $2,000,000 in the fund drive. All-America honors have come to Academy athletes. Lt. Bob Siteman, Class of 1959, became the first cadet to win national fame .when he was named to the All-America Rifle Team in 1958. Later that same year, Lt. Brock Strom, also Class of '59 and cap- tain of the Cotton Bowl-bound Falcons, was an unanimous first team tackle choice on most All- America elevens. Varsity sports come under the Department of Intercollegiate At- hletics, which is charged with the program for varsity, junior var- sity and freshman sports. The Air Force Academy Athletic Associa- tion, a non-profit organization of Air Force personnel, administers the financial operation of the pro- gram. Varsity teams make the head- lines and win acclaim, but Aca- demy planners never lose sight of the importance of the overall athletic program for developing every cadet to the limit of his ability. The athletic program tak- es its place with Academics and Airmanship at the Air Force Aca- demy in helping to produce the graduate of today — the Aero- space Age leader of the future. Reykjavik Golfers Mount Over Locals Reykjavik's golf club beat the Keflavik Airport team 30% to 16% points in the Lt. Jason Clark Memorial golf tournament held May 28. Top man for the locals was CWO J. Reeves who carded a 72 to lead the Keflavik contingent. Capt. H. Dingus was second with 17, and they were followed by A2C J. Snyder and SMSgt. P. Graham with 80; BM2 F. Kisil, 83; A2C S. Lackey, 84; Lt. B. Stimac, 88; Maj. H. Hutchins, 91; SMS H. Pedersen, 92; Capt. J. Lunghofer, 93; Mr. J. Miolla, 94; Maj. M. Thompson, 96; A2C T. Wilson, 102: Mr. J. Swanson, 105; Capt. P. Phillips, 107; and A2C P. Assilen, 124.

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The White Falcon

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