The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 17.06.1961, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 17.06.1961, Blaðsíða 1
Help Save Gdld. Buy American. Buying Bdnds Helps Save Gdld. Volume XI, Number 23 Headquarters, Air Forces Iceland, Keflavik Airport, Iceland—A MATS Unit Saturday, June 17, 1961 Review Ceremony Slated To Mark Command Change RAdm. Moore Succeeds Colonel Willis At Helm A wing Review and change-over ceremony is scheduled to be held at Keflavik Airport July 1, in which the USAF will step out of the picture as command element, and turn turn the reins of command over to USN. Colonel Benjamin G. Willis, Air Force commander"^ since July 24, 1959, will turn over PaM/Hf The office of the Assistant Di- rector for Limited Warfare Sys- tems has been established by the Director of Defense Research and Engineering, Dr. Harold Brown. The new office combines the func- tions of the former Assistant Di- rectors for Naval Weapons and Tactical Weapons. Overall responsibilities of the new office include activities in the fields of sea combat, anti- submarine warfare, fleet air de- fense, amphibious and land com- bat, mobility, logistics, guerrilla, counter-guerrilla and tactical war- fare systems, and related phases of tactical warfare. * * * An Air Force C-130 Hercules began airlifting a nuclear power plant to a Wyoming mountain top. The USAF jet-prop plane took the first of sixteen consignments from the Martin plant at Balti- more, Md., to Ellsworth AFB, S. Dak., where it will be trans- ported by truck to an Air De- fense Command radar site atop Warren' Peak, Wyo. Once assembled the reactor will provide seven million BTUs (British Thermal Units) of heat and one thousand kilowatts of electric power hourly to the ADC SAGE warning site. * * * The "sit up" calisthenics fad ap- pears to be spreading. SSgt. Ric- hard J. Ropac of the 798th AC- &W Sq., Scott AFB, 111., sat up 2,150 times in just under three hours after reading an AFNS dis- patch telling how A3C William J. Veader, Chennault AFB, La., claimed a sit up record of 1,600 in 1 hour 25 minutes, MATS re- ports. While AFNS is sitting up and taking notice, we regretfully re- lay a United Press International dispatch that a Denver, Colo., doc- tor has claimed the world sit-up record with 9,000 consecutive sit- ups in slightly over eight hours. * * * Two Air Force missiles — a Titan and Atlas — were success- fully test fired in late May, the Pentagon announced. The Titan, launched May 24 at Cape Canaveral, Fla., traveled 5,000 miles down the Atlantic Mis- sile Range and landed in the pre- dicted target area. Its data cap- sule was recovered. The Atlas was fired May 25 at Vandenberg AFB, Calif., by a Strategic Air Command launch crew as an operational training and test exercise made to check out modified procedures. INTERESTING BIRD A crowd of about 1,400 people gathered at Keflavik harbor on Icelandic Seamen's Day for a rescue heUcopter demonstration. Piloted by Capt. Robert R. Weber with TSgt. Donald B. Sanders as crew chief, the chopper "rescued" 1st Lt. David A. Jarratt of the Keflavik Airport Rescue Branch from a raft in the harbor using the horse collar (type sling. Later Capt. Charles A. Paul, safety officer, dressed in an exposure suit and Mae West was picked up from the choppy waters in a rescue basket. The 57th Fighter Interceptor Squadron provided an F-89 crew in operational flying gear and a display of rescue and survival equipment. They Remember George (This final edition would not be complete without mentioning Ge- orge and this little feature crop- ped up at just the right time. It was written by the sister of a former employe here, Mrs. Mar- jorie Hunt now of Sweden. Our thanks to Mrs. Hunt and to her sister for mailing us this inter- esting little item. We aren't changing a single word—Editor.) Nobody could remember how it was that George first came there. Some said he was included in the negotiations that the United Stat- es Government made for the Base. He was part of the background: as familiar as the barbed wire and the long, low huts, and al- most as squalied to look upon. Yet his squalor was both accept- able and congenial because it was warm and alive. Occasionally somebody noticed that George stank, and he got a bath, but this was not often be- cause no one was really respons- ible for him, even though he man- aged to infiltrate his faintly dis- gusting presence into all the ac- tivities of the Base. Being non-denominational he at- tended each religious service in turn, with a slight preference for the Roman Catholic. Every new arrival had the pleasure or otherwise (according to his outlook on life) of George's company for two days. The old hands would nod wisely and say: "George is vetting the new guy," but somehow they all knew that he meant it kindly because he liked them to feel at home. For long and faithful service he was made a Sergeant and proudly headed many a parade. No maneuver was ever carried out without his company in an advisory capacity, reconnaissance being his particular talent. Perhaps his most endearing quality was a complete lack of class-consciousness. He hobnobbed equally with the Base Commander and the rawest G.I. Even when ,he suffered the ignominy of los- ing his stripes after being found asleep in the Confessional Box at the Base R.C. Chapel, he remained unperturbed and continued to patronise the Sergeant's Mess whenever the inclination took him there. The day came when the Army had to leave to return to the Un- ited States and the Navy were to take over the Base. Trucks lined up along the concrete roadway (See George, Page 7.) the Iceland Defense Force to Rear Admiral Robert B. Moore. Captain William R. Meyer will command the Naval Air Station. Colonel Willis is scheduled to leave shortly after the ceremony for Stewart Air Force Base in Bird Bows Out This will be the last issue of the White Falcon. By coincidence the last White Falcon, named for the national bird of Iceland, appears on the country's Independence Day. With the Navy taking over host-service responsibility for this NATO base on July 1, pre- sent plans are for the Navy to begin publication of a base paper here in the near future. The final issue of the White Falcon contains eight pages to provide a picture spread of re- cent activities at Keflavik Air- port and feature articles. The staff of the White Fal- con is returning to the States this month. TSgt. Wylie Mason, editor, is being assigned to Headquarters ADC, Ent AFB, Colo., and SSgt. John W. Horky, assistant, to Bunker Hill AFB, Ind. New York where he will take command of the 1st Air Reserve Region. Admiral Moore was born in Charlotte, N. C, Oct. 21, 1909, the son of Dr. Baxter S. Moore (now deceased) and Caro (Bre- vard) Moore. Upon completion of his education in the public schools of Charlotte and at the Severn School, Severna Park, Md., he was granted an appointment to the United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, Md. Commissioned Ensign, United States Navy upon his graduation from the Naval Academy on June 2, 1932 he attained the rank of Rear Admiral when assigned the duties of Commander Barrier Forces, U.S. Atlantic Fleet, Sept. 30, 1960. Admiral Moore's first service before attending flight training was in ships of both the Atlantic and Pacific Fleets. In April 1936, he completed flight training and was designated a Naval Aviator. Since that time, his carrer has been almost exclusively identified with Naval Aviation. His service has included exten- sive administrative duty as a member of both Navy and joint commands and command of sever- al ships. One of these—the USS Siboney—was a part of a mercy mission that was dispatched to Tampico, Mexico in the autumn of 1955 for relief of the civilian population after a series of hur- ricanes struck the area. Helicopters from the Siboney flew hundreds of missions carry- ing medical supplies and food stuffs to the disaster area. The helicopters also rescued countless numbers of people who had taken refuge in tree tops and on the roofs of buildings from the high (See Changeover, Page 7.) Summer Program For Youngsters Set At Keflavik The special two-week summer recreation program at the Youth Center will get underway Monday and will include junior and senior life saving classes, games, sports, tours, picnics and crafts. As part of the summer pro- gram, a bicycle rodeo and special- ly decorated wheel patrol was held at Taxiway F on June 10. Skilled bicycle riding exercises were one of the features of the rodeo. Winners at the rodeo were: first place, Kathy Zartman; sec- ond place, Greg Thompson; and third place, Diana Whittington. The summer activities at the Center are under the direction of Mrs. Alice Roth and Mrs. Monroe Zartman. During the summer months, the hours of operation at the Youth Center will be 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Friday and 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, and Saturdays, 7:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. U.S. AIR FORCE — AEROSPACE POWER FOR PEACE

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