The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 08.01.1965, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 08.01.1965, Blaðsíða 1
101b tAH33SB(KASAFN uJl 'My RAdm Ralph Weymouth Rear Admiral R. Weymouth Arrives Tues. RAdm Ralph Weymouth, pro- spective commander of the Iceland Defense Force, is scheduled to ar- rive with his family at Keflavik International Airport Tuesday. New Command Admiral Weymouth is to relieve RAdm Paul D. Buie in change of command ceremonies to take place Jan. 16 at Hangar 831. A native of Florida, Admiral Weymouth is coming to Iceland from duties as Assistant for Ad- vanced Technology with the office of the Chief of Naval Operations in Washington D.C. Florida Born May 26, 1917, he entered the Naval Academy in 1934 and was commissioned June 2, 1938. The admiral took flight training at Pensacola and Miami, Fla. and was designated a naval aviator in February 1941. In March he joined the USS Saratoga for duty with Scouting Squadron Three, where he served until January 1943, when he was assigned to Bombing Sqaudron 16 as commanding officer. MIT From 1944 to 1946. Admiral Weymouth served with the Com- mander, Naval Operational Train- ing and later attended the Naval Post-Graduate School. He con- tinued his course at the Massa- chusetts Institue of Technology where he received the degree of Master of Science in Aeronautical Engineering in September 1949. The admiral served as navigator of the USS Kearsarge from 1949 to 1950 and then commanded Fighting Squadron 112 and later Air Group 11 of the USS Philip- pine Sea. Pacific Duty with the staff of the Com- mander, Air Force Pacific fol- lowed and he attended the Armed Forces Staff College in 1952. A tour of duty in the Bureau of Naval Weapons as Fighter Air- craft Design Branch Head pre- ceded his assignment in 1954 to the Staff of the Commander in Chief, Pacific Fleet. Student He then served at the Naval Academy and as Commanding Of- ficer of the USS Duxbury Bay and USS Lake Champlain before becoming a student at the Na- tional War College. Eight Children Admiral Weymouth's official residence is 624 White Street, KeyAVest, Fla. He is married to the former Miss Laure Bouchage of Port" Blanc, France, He and his. wife have eight children: Yann, Reirie"¦:"'Anne, Martina, Danielle, Lani, Letitia, Laura and Lawrence. fSLAHD! THE WHITE Fall ©(Dim U.S. NAVAL STATION, KEFLAVIK INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT, ICELAND Volume IV, Number 1 Friday, January 8, 1965 Two VP-23 Sailors Receive Awards At Meritorious Mast Two VP-23 sailors, Michael J. Devich, PN3, and Donald L. Nelson, ATN2, earned congratulations at meritorious mast held 8. a.m. Monday at Hangar 831. Devich received the VP-23, Detachment 13, Sailor of the Month award for December anc*^ Nelson was presented with the Aircrewman wings. Sailor of the Month The recipient of this award must demonstrate outstanding qualities as an "all around" sailor. In his letter of recommendation Ltjg J. B. Purcell states, "During the present split deployment he (Devich) has been assigned to this activity as the senior petty officer in the Personnel Office, a billet usually reserved for a first class or Chief personnel- man ... He went on to say, "Recogniz- ing the need of the squadron, Devich has reported for work during many of his off-duty hours without being told to do so. Devich gets along exceptionally well with others and provides an invaluable contribution to a high state of morale." Advancement Twenty-one year old Devich en- listed in Denver, Colo, in Oct. 1961. After recruit training he served with Fleet Tactical Support Squadron 21 and Fighter Squad- ron 102. He joined VP-23 in April 1963 and advanced to third class in June 1964. Mike hails from Thornton, Colo, where he received a portion of his education. He has since then completed his schooling through United States Armed Forces In- stitute tests and received a Colo- rado State equivalency cei-tificate. Aircrewman Wings A presentation of Aircrewman wings was made to Donald L. Nelson, ATN2. Nelson joined VP-23 in October 1963 and began flying with Combat Air Crew 8. At that time, he began his train- ing to become a qualified crew- man. This includes land and water survival, written and oral exam- inations concerning primary and secondary positions, ground lec- tures and completion of the re- quired number of flight hours gaining experience in his primary position on the crew. Normally 18 months are allowed for the completion of all require- ments. Nelson finished in just 13 months. -4! Sec. Robert S. McNamara Pro - Pay Increased Washington (AFPS)—Secretary of Defense Robert S. McNamara's approval of $122-million for FY66 proficiency pay could result in nearly 11,000 additional personnel receiving specialty pay. As part of the FY66 Defense budget, Secretary McNamara ap- proved an additional $4.5-million over the current fiscal year's pro- pay allocation of $117.5 million. The increase permits pro-pay for an additional 4,942 Navy per- sonnel; 3,991 Air Force; 1,770 Army and 248 members of the Marine Corps. There are approximately 200,000 personnel now receiving proficien- cy pay. The new fiscal year be- gins July 1. The additional funding over last year's pro-pay allocation was provided to accommodate normal growth in pro-pay specialties through increased reenlistment rate and requirements in approved skills. The specialist pro-pay of P-l, $50; P-2, $75 and P-3, $100 and $30 for "superior performance" will go to 85,160 Army members, 41,325 sailors and 6,812 Marines. The Air Force payments of P-l, $30 and P-2, $60 will go to 74,412 airmen. The Air Force does not have anyone receiving P-3 pro- pay. The Army and Marine Corps are the only services paying the $30 per month "superior perform- ance" pay. Cdr H. Wilbur New IDF Aide RAdm Paul D. Buie, commander Iceland Defense Force, added a new face to his staff Dec. 15 as he pinned the aiguilette on the shoulder of Cdr Harley D. Wilbur, the admiral's new aide and flag secretary. Commander Wilbur came to Keflavik last month after serving as operations officer with VP-26 at Naval Air Station, Brunswick, Maine. He replaces Lt Cdr Ralph C. Peters, Jr., who is leaving Kef- lavik for the Armed Forces Staff College, Norfolk, Va. Entertaining the Navy in De- cember 1945, Commander Wilbur progressed through the rank to his present grade. He has attended the Naval Post Graduate School, Monterey, Calif., and the Univer- sity of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. He graduated from the Uni- versity in 1961 with a master's degree. His home is in Rochester, Mich, and he is married to the former Miss Althea Neff of Highland (Park, Mich. They have three children: Kimberly, 11; Russell, 8 and Gwenan, 2 months. Comman- der Wilbur is a member of the U.S. Chess Federation and the Phi Beta Kappa Society. Olafur Thors Thors' Death Brings Grief To Icelanders Olafur Thors, 72, a former tPrime Minister of Iceland, died Dec. 31 at 11 a.m. in Reykjavik following a stroke which he suf- fered two days before. Forty Years Called the Churchill of Scandi- navia, Thors had been involved in Icelandic politics for almost 40 years. He first became a mem- ber of the Althing (Parliament) in 1925 when elected as represent- ative for the Keflavik area—an office he held until his death. UN And NATO As Prime Minister he brought Iceland into the United Nations in 1945 and into NATO in 1949. He resigned his post in November 1963 due to illness. Five Governments He was Chairman of the Inde- pendence Party from 1934 to 1962 and formed five different govern- ments, the last in 1959. In the thirties he became Min- ister of Justice and Minister of Public Works. Icelandic Birth. Born in Borgarnes, located on the west coast of Iceland Jan. 19, 1892, Olafur Thors's father was Danish and his mother Icelandic. Schooled He was graduated from school in Reykjavik in 1912 and attended the University of Copenhagen for two years before managing his father's trawler company. He is survived by his widow and four children. READINESS: YESTERDAY AND TODAY—More than 20 years separate these two scenes. In 1942, Army Air Corps "Flying Tiger" pilots of Maj. Gen. Claire Chennault's China-based Fourteenth Air ! Force run to their armed Curtiss P-40 Tomahawk fighters after hearing the "Jing Bow" (air raid) signal. In 1964, Air Force pilots race for their supersonic Convair F-102 Delta' Daggers during an exercise at arCaii;base in Yiet-Nam. The F-102's were sent'to Southeast Asia in August 1964 as part of the U.S. buildup'following the Gulf of Tonkin crisis. There is a possibility that some of the aircraft pictured here went through Keflavik Naval Station last summer.

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The White Falcon

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