The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 19.02.1965, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 19.02.1965, Blaðsíða 1
Naval Station Honors 'Men Of The Month' The Iceland Defense Forces' Sailor, Airman and Ma- rine for the Month of December were recognized in cere- monies held Feb. 8 in Hangar 831. RAdm Ralph Weymouth, Commander Iceland Defense Force, presented the Certificates of Achievement and $25 checks to the selected men in his office. Sailor of the Month, Nicholas A. Schneider, CMA3, a native of Walbridge, Ohio, graduated from Lake-Milbury High School in Lake-Milbury, Ohio. Schneider works in the Public Works De- partment as a member of the Field Power unit, which main- tains and tests emergency gene- rators and compressors on base. Prior to reporting to Iceland, he was a member of Mobile Con- struction Battalion 4 in Davis- ville, R. I. Airman of the Month, Douglas P. Coy, A1C, of the 932nd Air- craft Control and Warning Squad- ron is a native of St. Joseph, Mo., and a graduate of Benton High School in St. Joseph. Coy was at the South Pole as a member of Operation Deep Freeze "64". Upon completion of his military obliga- tions he plans to study in the medical field. Prior to reporting to Iceland, Coy was stationed at Charleston Air Force Base, S.C. Marine of the Month, Cpl. Timothy J. Kearns, a member of the security guard stationed at the Security Camp, is a native of Mayfield Hgts., Ohio. While at the Security Camp Kearns will be serving as Standing Marine Offi- cer of the Day. A graduate of Brush High School, Lyndhurst, Ohio, he entered the Marine Corps on Sept. 4, 1962. Prior to reporting to Iceland, Kearns was stationed at Camp Lejuene, N. C. Military bearing, appearance, professional performance and leadership potentialities are some of the areas of outstanding merits which play a part in selection for Sailor, Airman, and Marine of the Month. Hand-Knitted Helmets Preferred In Arctic Hand-knitted helmets, first pro- duced on a large scale in World War I by Red Cross volunteers, are still favorite headgear used in the sub-zero temperature of the Artie. The helmet preserves unique in- sulating benefits furnished by the loose threads of wool, experts on the Arctic say. With no neck or facial exposure except for eye slits it is considered the best head protection in the most severe weather when worn with a parka. A Red Cross field director re- ported, "They are in great de- mand for inclusion in survival kits." On three occasions last year, the helmets were credited with contributing to the survival of military personnel involved in air- craft crashes in Greenland. ' (AFPS) Johnson To Update Old Retirement Data President Johnson has asked a Cabinet-level committee for its final report on Federal retirement programs by Dec. 1, 1965. President Johnson appointed the committee to "establish up-to-date guides for use in the executive branch in considering proposed changes and further improvements in retirement plans." The president requested a thor- ough review of retirement policies as to objectives, civilian and uni- formed personnel coverage, bene- fit patterns, financial soundness and overall consistency. He further requested that sur- vivor benefits under various re- tirement plans be examined in re- lationship to similar benefits pro- vided under Social Security, Gov- ernment Life Insurance and other disability, death and survivorship programs. (AFPS) U.S. NAVAL STATION, Volume IV, Number 7 THE WHITE PaiUcBCDim. KEFLAVIK INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT, ICELAND Friday, February 19, 1965 Hail & Bless Personnel who have arrived (Hail) and left (Bless) U.S. Naval Station, Keflavik for duty as of Feb. 9: HAIL Ferdcort, J. C, SA Orlando, A. J., AGAN May, P. A., AX2 Kelley, H. A. Jr., AGAN Cook, J. F. Jr., CN Rushford, L. J., ABFA8 Dunn, J. F. 2nd, HM3 Cobb, J. R. UT1 Bulet, M. C, AN Beiswamger, D. L. ETMSN Weaver, G. E., HN Bridge, H., ABF2 Wright, C. H., AGAA (Continued on page 8.) Scrawl Slows Tax Returns "When will I get my refund?" is one of the most frequently asked questions by taxpayers, according to an Internal Revenue Service (IRS) official. However, an illegible name or address quite often is the reason for failure to receive refunds, the official stated. Thousands of re- fund checks are returned to the IRS every year because the post- man cannot deliver them. IRS officials say it is permis- sible to sign your name at the bottom of the return the way you always sign your name, even if your signature is a hurried scrawl. But at the top of the return, be sure that your name and address are carefully printed or typed along with your Social Security number. (AFPS) Naval Station Sitting On Mid-Ocean Ridge Although the personnel here may not realize it, they are sitting on a gigantic, globe- girding range of volcanic mountains called the Mid-Ocean Ridge. The ridge meanders through all the world's oceans and dwarfs any range of moun- tains on land. It is 1,000 miles wide, 40,000 miles long, and covers an area equal to the land mass of Europe, Asia and Africa combined. Lava flows and earthquakes occur somewhere along its immense length every'?1' day. Not many people have heard of the ridge. Parts of it haven't even been mapped. For most of the ridge is hiding beneath a mile or more of water. There is, in fact, only one place in the world where one can really see what the Mid-Ocean Ridge is like without getting your feet wet. That place is Iceland. For Ice- XIP-OCEAW 1 land and its hundreds of volcanos, active and dead, are a segment of the ridge, risen out of the sea. Here in Iceland, moreover, one of the most striking and puzzling features of the ridge is evident. Along almost the entire length of the ridge there runs a great rift, 10 to 20 miles wide and a mile deep, as though the earth's crust were being torn apart. This great rift runs right across Iceland, forming a giant trench through the mountains from the south- west corner of the island near Keflavik to the northern coast. Within the trench are scores of deep fissures showing that the earth's crust is cracking apart along the line. Icelanders call the fissures "gja" (pronounced "gyaw). The largest and most famous is Al- mannagja, a four-and-a-half-mile- long, 120-foot-deep crack about 30 miles from Reykjavik at the edge of the valley where the Althing— the Iceland Parliament—met out in the open for hundreds of years. Speakers used the Almannagja's lava walls as a natural sounding board. Many "gja" are found in the rift area of Iceland. Careful mea- surements have shown that most of the fissures are pulling apart at a rate of several inches a cen- tury. The Iceland rift as a whole is widening at a rate of two inches a year. The North Atlantic island on which we are stationed—which is about the size of Kentucky—has more active volcanos than any other land area of comparable size in the world. More than 40 have erupted one or more times since (Continued on Page 8.) NEW CANADIAN FLAG—Adm H. P. Smith, NATO's Supreme Allied Commander Atlantic, gets his first look at Canada's new maple-leaf flag in ceremonies at his NATO headquarters, Norfolk, Va. Capt R. M. Steele, Royal Canadian Navy, the senior Canadian officer on the International NATO staff at Norfolk presented the flag for a "peek preview" on Feb. 9, 1965. The new 11-point flag became Canada's offi- cial National Ensign in ceremonies at noon, Feb. 15. The 11 points represent each of the ten provinces in Canada and one for the North- west Territory. The red and white colors are Canada's official colors. The red borders depict the Canadian motto "From Sea to Sea." Their present red ensign with the Union Jack and the Coat of Arms was first authorized in 1892 and revised in 1921. Since 1945 it has served as the national ensign of Canada. (Official NATO Atlantic Command Photo) 6ll-Point Flag' Becomes Canada's National Ensign The 15-nation flag plaza at Norfolk's NATO headquarters was the scene for the official debut of a new red and white maple-leaf Canadian flag in ceremonies Monday. VAdm I. W. T. Beloe, C.B., D.S.C., Royal Navy, Deputy Supreme Allied Commander Atlantic conducted the cere- mony for the raising of the new®' flag. Formal ceremonies were con- ducted at the Peace Tower of the Parliament Buildings in Ottawa, Canada; at the Canadian Embassy in Washington, D.C. and at the NATO headquarters in Paris, France. Also, some form of flag ceremony took place world-wide, wherever the Canadian flag was flying. Canadian Representative Commodore James Pratt, Royal Canadian Navy, Chief of Staff to the Flag Officer Atlantic Coast in Halifax, Nova Scotia, represented the Canadian Government for the ceremony. He was assisted by a Color Party of a Canadian Officer as Color Bearer flanked by an enlisted guard. LCdr Clark McRedy, Royal Canadian Navy, Color Officer, ceremoniously marched off the present national flag and pre- sented it to Admiral Beloe, who passed it to Commodore Pratt for custody. The new maple-leaf flag was presented to Admiral Beloe by Commodore Pratt. The present Canadian national flag was authorized for use in 1892. It bears the Union flag in the first quarter and the Canadian Coat of Arms on the fly. On the coat of arms are the three lions of England, the lion and double treasure of Scotland, the Harp of Ireland, the Fleur de Lis for France, and the red maple leaves for Canada. Prior to 1892 Canada flew the British Union flag. This new 11-point leaf flag, familiar to Canadians as a long- standing symbol, is placed on a white background between red borders depicting the Canadians motto—"FROM SEA TO SEA". The 11 points signify one for each of the 10 provinces of Canada and one for the territories in the North. (Continued on page 8.) 'O'Club Holds Dance The Officers' Club will hold a Mardi Gras Theme Dance at its Main Ballroom, Feb. 27, at 9 p.m. In order to bring a bit of New Orleans to the U.S. Naval Station, Keflavik, costumes are highly recommended but other appropriate attire is acceptable (almost). Prizes for the best men's and ladies' costumes by audience vote will be awarded. So, come on down! Confound your friends! Fool your foes! And have a good time with everyone!!

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