The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 28.05.1965, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 28.05.1965, Blaðsíða 1
AFWL's Eighth Ranked Sea Service Newspaper - 1964 THE WHITE U.S. NAVAL STATION, KEFLAVIK INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT, ICELAND Volume IV, Number 20 Friday, May 28, 1965 AWARDS AND INSPECTION—The handing out of Good Conduct Certificates took place during the monthly Personnel Inspection held Saturday at 9:3 0 a.m. in Hangar 831. Cdr Richard C. James, com- manding officer of U.S. Naval Station, Keflavik, (left) presents the Good Conduct Certificate and fourth award to Frederick F. Boll, Jr., AEC. The other four sailors who received the certificates were Lloyd D. Harris, Jr., SK2, first award; Robert R. M aloney, BM2, third award; Carl R. DeBlank, CS3, first award; and Dale A. Germain, CS1, fifth award. The picture on the right shows Commander James inspecting the ranks. President Johnson's Bill To Offer 5% Pay Increase To Military Personnel President Johnson submitted to the Congress a proposed bill to adjust the rates of pay of the military services and federal civilian employees in fiscal year 1966 on May 12. This proposed bill also contains a provision to establish a Federal salary review com- mission to be convened in calendar year 1966 to conduct a first quadrennial review of the monetary relationships of federal civilian employees and the military service. This commission will provide a permanent mechanism for impartial review at four intervals. The proposal further provides a formal means by which annual pay adjust- ments in intervening years can'^ become effective without specific legislative action by the Congress. Compensation Adjustments This procedure would authorize the President to immediately ef- fect compensation adjustments at the expiration of 60 days following the transmittal to the Congress of an adjustment proposal, unless the Congress during those 60 days passed a resolution indicating dis- favor. For All Except Under Two The specific adjustments recom- mended by the President to be ef- fective in 1966 call for increases as follows: for all except enlisted personnel with under 2 years ser- vice, an average increase of 5 per cent in military base pay; an average increase in federal civi- lian salaries of 3 per cent (these proposed adjustments are calcu- lated to restore the relationships between federal, civilian and mili- tary pay which were established in 1963); a 2.7 per cent cost of living increase in base pay of en- listed personnel with under 2 years of service. Reenlistment Bonuses A new feature of military com- pensation has been addressed as well. This would provide authority to pay multiples of the present reenlistment bonus upon first re- enlistment to military personnel designated as having critical mili- tary skill. This proposal is an advanced step in evolutionary de- velopment of separate pay for technical skills. Increased retention of experi- enced and skilled personnel is a primary objective. This proposal will provide a flexible administra- tive means to focus additional in- centives in the most critical areas of need. The President's bill continues the effort which began in 1962 to develop and modernize Federal compensation practices. Further improvements in Armed Service compensation systems will be re- inforced by the quadrennial re- views to be conducted by impartial commissions. Gen. Holcomb Dies Brig. Gen. Thomas Holcomb, USMC (Ret.), died May 24. General Holcomb was com- mandant of the Marine Corps when he retired in 1943. Flags on the NATO Base were at half staff as the White Falcon went to press Wednes- day. They are scheduled to re- main at half staff until sunset this evening. Full military honors are to be given the general at Arling- ton National Cemetery. One Year Of Obligated Service Must Be Due For Promotion Attention all sailors who are going up for first or second class petty officers! According to a new ruling issued by the Chief of Naval Personnel, those who take the August 1965 tests and make the rate effective Nov. 1, 1965, must have at least one year of obligated service left. If not, one must sign an agree-'f' ment to extend or reenlist for one Cpl. It. Taylor Given Medal For Heroism Cpl. Rodney E. Taylor, USMC, was posthumously awarded the Navy-Marine Corps Medal (the highest military award that can be given for heroism in peacetime) Jan. 17, 1964, it was learned recently. Corporal Taylor arrived at Keflavik Marine Barracks Jan. 17, 1964 and lost his life on duty as sergeant of the guard while attempting to rescue'!* a Boy Scout being swept out to sea Sept. 19, 1964. He was over- come by exhaustion and exposure when he tried to swim out and rescue the scout who was clinging to some boards in the bitter cold water of the bay off Iceland's southwestern shore. The scout was later rescued by a Naval Station helicopter. Signed By Paul Nitze A citation signed by Paul Nitze, secretary of the Navy, on behalf of the President of the United States and the Commandant of the Marine Corps, accompanied the award. The medal and citation were presented to Mrs. Littlejohn, Taylor's mother, by Maj. Robert Boles, USMC, inspector-instructor for the Marine Reserves at Chat- tanooga, Tenn. "We are here to pay tribute to a young man whose act was the ultimate a man can give. He gave his life for another," Major Boles told those present. His Heroism Rare "In wartime, acts of heroism are commonplace. But in peace- time such acts are rare—and rare, indeed," he said. Major Boles then read the cita- tion and presented the medal to Mrs. Littlejohn, who was seated with her family and Miss Judith Mitchell of Savannah, Ga., Tay- lor's fiancee (they had planned a wedding in January), at a table in the chamber of Chattanooga's City Hall. Members of the family with Mrs. Littlejohn included Virgil D. Littlejohn, the husband and step-father; Perry Littlejohn, 13, and Kathy Littlejohn, 11, half- brother and half-sister of Corporal Taylor. Family's Statement Following the presentation of the award, SSgt. Paul Allen, USMC, read a statement prepared by the family, as a response. The statement is as follows: "My family and I appreciate the high honor bestowed upon our son and brother. "He fought a good-fight—and God chose to decorate him with the greatest award. "In my son's absence, I will ac- cept his medal with the same pride, and with the knowledge his efforts were not fruitless. Thank you," the reply, which was signed by Katherine Littlejohn, concluded. Taylor From South Corporal Taylor was born Oct. 4, 1942 and spent his youth in LaFayette, Ga., graduating from LaFayette High School in 1961. He learned to swim in a creek near his home at the age of 7, enjoyed the sport and developed into a good swimmer, his mother related. Miss Mitchell was brought to LaFayette by Sergeant Allen to attend the awards ceremony. She (Continued on page 6.) Gen. Besson Visits Keflavik Brig. Gen. Thomas H. Beeson, commander of the Goose Air De- fense Sector, arrived here Mon- day evening to pay his final of- ficial visit to Air Forces Iceland units. The general has been notified of a new assignment effective next month and is currently making a swing around GADS units on farewell visits. He has been com- mander of the sector since Decem- ber 1963. His command stretched from southern Newfoundland to northei-n Greenland- and Iceland, covering more than a million square miles. General Beeson spent Monday evening visiting with officers of AFI units here, and Tuesday morning boarded a plane for Hofn where he made a last inspection of H-3,. an Air Force radar site nestled at the bottom of a rugged Icelandic mountain range. He returned to Keflavik that afternoon, visiting AFI sections and then was guest speaker at an officers dining-in Tuesday night. General Beeson is a command pilot with more than 3,900 flying hours primarily in single-engined aircraft, including 1,864 hours in jet fighters. He is combat-ready in the F-102 fighter-interceptor. year or that amount of time as to complete one full year in the new rate. Try To Curb Discharges The move is to try to curb those who upon promotion to E-5 or E-6 have accepted discharges just after receiving the new stripes. This has denied promotions of men who desire to stay or extend awhile plus the fact that much money and time is wasted. The Navy hopes that with the new monthly promotion system declined, promotion will be filled by another man in the promotion cycle. Nine Months To Ponder For those who first turn down that extra stripe because of ex- tension or reenlistment etc., they will have approximately nine months to change their minds. The midsummer tests' final ad- vancement date is May 15, 1966, while next February's exam is not concluded until the following November 1966. If one changes his mind he must sei've from the date he accepts the promotion and not at the ini- tial advancement date. More information on this new ruling can be found in BuPers Notice 1980 of May 5. NEW CHEVRONS—Capt T. J. Bratten, commanding officer of U.S. Naval Communication Station, Iceland, presents Certificates of Ad- vancement in Rate to (from left to right) James L. Carte, ETN3, Wil- liam T. Staman, ETN2 and Roger N. Montgomery, ETN2, while Lt W. J. Farrel, officer in charge of H-2 Site looks on. The ceremonies took place in the Administration Office of H-2 Site, Langanes, Iceland, May 18, 1965.

x

The White Falcon

Beinir tenglar

Ef þú vilt tengja á þennan titil, vinsamlegast notaðu þessa tengla:

Tengja á þennan titil: The White Falcon
https://timarit.is/publication/382

Tengja á þetta tölublað:

Tengja á þessa síðu:

Tengja á þessa grein:

Vinsamlegast ekki tengja beint á myndir eða PDF skjöl á Tímarit.is þar sem slíkar slóðir geta breyst án fyrirvara. Notið slóðirnar hér fyrir ofan til að tengja á vefinn.