The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 16.07.1965, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 16.07.1965, Blaðsíða 1
Maj. File Gains Rank; Leaves Kef As Lt.Col. Maj. Richard A. Fite, USA, Iceland Defense Force (IDF) plans officer, was promoted to lieutenant colonel in cere- monies held Tuesday morning at the BarForLant office, Hangar 831. RAdm Ralph Weymouth, IDF commander, congratulated Colonel Fite upon his promotion. Then, both the admiral and Lt. Col. Gordon T. Fearson, assistant chief of staff for Logistics, IDF, pinned the'f' silver oak leaves on the colonel. Colonel Fite left Iceland Wed- nesday night for duty with the Career Management Division, Of- fice of Personnel Operations, De- partment of the Army, in Wash- ington. Multi-Faceted Career Prior to reporting ahoard U. S. Naval Station, Keflavik, he at- tended the Army Command and General Staff College in Ft. Leav- enworth, Kan. Colonel Fite was a familiar sight around the Naval Station in both work, sports and play. His red Austin-Healey Sprite was familiar too. It has appeared at a car wash, in the newspaper and even in a BOQ poolroom. One of the highlights during his one-year tour of Iceland was his first jet fighter ride in the 57th Fighter-Interceptor Squad- ron's TF-102 plane. The army colonel, a paratrooper who has completed over 300 jumps, took the ride early last March. Sport Enthusiast During that same month, Co- lonel Fite and his partner, Colonel Fearson, won the Naval Station's Badminton Doubles Tourney and received the first-place trophy. On April 3, 1965 he took part in a Search And Rescue Exer- cise held in Iceland which com- bined the efforts of the Navy, Air Force, Marines and the Ice- land Ground Rescue Force. In a recent golf tournament held in Akureyri, June 27, the colonel was team captain of the Defense Force Team that played the Akureyri Golf Team. Once Enlisted Man A native of Oklahoma City, Okla., Colonel Fite enlisted in the U. S. Army in 1945 spending basic training at Camp Livingston, La. After two years of active duty he was discharged from the ser- vice and entered the University of Oklahoma in 1946. While in college he attended the Army ROTC program and reentered the Army in 1950 as second lieutenant. He served in the Korean Con- flict while with the 187th Air- borne Regimental Combat Team during 1951, '52 and '53. In 1951 he attained the rank of first lieutenant. Attached To Airborne Units During the next several years Colonel Fite was stationed with the 11th Airborne Division, Ft. Campbell, Ky. and was promoted to the rank of captain in 1954. From 1959 to 1963 Captain Fite was attached to the U. S. Army Airborne School, Ft. Ben- ning, Ga., where he attended for a year the Career Information Course. In 1964 the captain received the rank of major. Among the medals he has re- ceived are the Purple Heart, the Master Parachutist Medal, the Combat Infantry Badge and the Distinguished Unit Citation. Colonel Fite is replaced in his duties by Maj. Robert P. Lott. LEGION OF MERIT — Admiral Thomas H. Moorer, USN, Com- mander in Chief Atlantic, pins the Legion of Merit on the former commander of the Iceland Defense Force, Rear Admiral Paul D. Buie, USN. Buie Earns Merit Awaid RAdm Paul D. Buie received the Legion of Merit award June 25, 1965 from Adm Thomas H. Moorer, USN, Commander in Chief Atlantic, at Atlantic Com- mand Headquarters. The award, presented on behalf of the Secretary of the Navy, cited Admiral Buie for his per- formance as commander of the Iceland Defense Force and Bar- rier Defense Force from April 1963 to January 1965. Admiral Buie was also cited for promoting good relations be- tween Department of Defense personnel stationed in Iceland and the Icelandic people. The citation pointed out Ad- miral Buie's outstanding qualities of "diplomacy and leadership" in both his national and NATO roles. Rear Admiral Buie is now serving as Commander of the U.S. Naval Aviation Safety Center at the Naval Air Station, Norfolk. AFWL's Eighth Ranked Sea Service Newspaper - 1964 THE WHITE CD (Dim U.S. NAVAL STATION, KEFLAVIK INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT, ICELAND Volume IV, Number 27 Friday, July 16, 1965 Foreign Language School Available For Dependents Dependent wives slated to live in a foreign country may study that country's language at various stateside military installations, if proposed legislation backed by the De- partment of Defense becomes law. The bill would authorize training at DOD facilities in- cluding the Defense Language Institute's west coast branch at Monterey, Calif. and other DOD education centers. Currently, this training is limited to the Foreign Sei'vices Institute in Washington. All Services Included As proposed, training would be authorized Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps depend- ents in anticipation of their spon- sor's foreign assignment. DOD's present intention would limit application to wives for tP- MOON STUDY — The first contingent of astronauts to arrive in Iceland to study areas resembling as nearly as possible that of the moon are these five high flyers. (From left) Maj. Donn F. Eisele, USAF; Lt Roger B. Chaffe, USN; Mr. Russell L. Schweickart, civilian and former Air Force pilot; LCdr Alan L. Bean, USN; and Capt. William A. Anders, USAF. — (Photo by Schmieg, JOSN) training in the United States in existing regular courses suitable for them and their husbands. Courses Expanded At a later date, when shorter full-time and part-time courses be- come available for personnel over- seas, authority would be used to permit enrollment of wives in these courses. Priority would be accorded to wives of attaches, military assi- stance advisory group and mission personnel, and personnel of inter- national headquarters. Dependents Are Ambassadors Dependents perform an impor- tant role in projecting a true image of the United States abroad, said Lt. Col. James L. Greekman, Jr., U. S. Army Deputy Director, Defense Language Institute. "Their ability to speak the language of the country concern- ed increases the effectiveness of their military sponsors and gene- rates inestimable good will for the United States," he said Keep Copy Coming In Attention base personnel! — Next week's issue of this paper will be a mimeographed edi- tion. Even with the temporary change in printing procedures, your articles are still most appreciated. Look forward in two weeks for another four- page regular edition. WESTERN DECOR — Inside the newly opened casual bar at the Ofilfcdrs' Club one can set bourbcii barrel—designed tableis and chairs in the foreground. Also notice the new ceiling in an egg crate pattern augmented by gas-type candlelights in the top center of picture. — (Photo by Schmieg. JOSN) Capt Pierre Officially Opens 'O' Club's New Western Bar Ribbon cutting ceremonies took place Saturday after- noon at the opening of a new Officer's Club lounge as officers, their wives and guests witnessed the event. Capt. Emile E. Pierre, Jr., Naval Station commanding of- ficer, Cdr Richard C. James, executive officer of the Naval Station, and Lt Nick Potts, liaison officer of the Officers' Club, officially opened the remo-l?> deled lounge. Set in a Western-type atmos- phere, this new addition was once the Terrace Lounge, until renova- tion began last January. Unique Atmosphere The new room has a unique tang in the air. Its 60 upholstered chairs and 12 tables are hewn from empty bourbon barrels from a Kentucky distillery. The furni- ture was manufactured in Akron, Ohio. The lounge, not yet named as of July 13, also boasts new light- ing, a dim lantern and gaslight effect, a low-level, egg crate ceil- ing, wooden wall paneling and new rugs. Texas Longhorns Lieutenant Potts said that he plans to have a pair of Texas Longhorns hung on the walls. The spa is designed to be a casual bar where just drinks will be served. A cost of $8,000 was spent for materials, building and manpower. Many thanks go out to Public Works, who did most of the job, and also to the officers, wives and employees of the club for their help. Base Help The Officers' Club saved $8,000 by having the room remodeled and outfitted by personnel on base than with a private concern from the States. The Western lounge's hours are from 5 p.m. to 12 p.m. on week- days and from 1 p.m. to 12 p.m. on weekends.

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The White Falcon

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