The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 20.08.1965, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 20.08.1965, Blaðsíða 1
AFWL's Eighth Ranked Sea Service Newspaper - 1964 THE WHITE IFffluLasdMra U.S. NAVAL STATION, KEFLAVIK INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT, ICELAND Volume IV, Number 30 Friday, August 20, 1965 New Additional Duty Order To Take Effect Immediately For Many Sailors, Marines The Navy's new order extending the duty of regular Navy and Marine personnel for a period of four months will immediately affect about 25 thousand sailors and 12 thousand Marines. Secretary of the Navy Paul Nitze sent the orders to all commands Aug. 13, and it was confirmed publicly the next day. The order applies to Navy men whose active service had been scheduled for completion1^" Sept. 15 or later and to Marines "whose duty would have ended Aug. 20 or later. Regular Navy or Marine offi- cers who request retirement, may find approval held up for one year, according to the newly is- sued order. The order also states requests by officers to resign may be deferred but not longer than one year. Personnel Shortages Although no reason was given for the order, it is a known fact that the Navy has been experi- encing shortages in personnel, especially in the skilled rates. This fact was made clear when the Navy was obligated to dip into the draft after calls went out for voluntary extensions of duty. Presently the Navy is planning its entire force structure where there are shortages in personnel and where there is need for man- power in manning of additional ships, aviation squadrons, medical and Seabee units, etc. The Navy is the only service that can extend a man involun- tarily for a period of six months, if he is regular and if an emer- gency is declared by the Presi- dent. Secretary Nitze has had this power to extend Navy personnel since the emergency that was pro- claimed in Korea, the secretary said before a Senate Armed Ser- vices Committee which met to discuss the military bill pay. No Such 'Bird' On White Falcon Staff Contrary to some thinking, there is NO White Falcon photographer! Through pro- per channels, however, photo- graphic coverage of events may be arranged by contacting the White Falcon office at Ext. 4156—at least 24 hours in ad- vance ! 'Bang Beat, Bell - Ringin, Big Haul' Rockets To Be Fired In Iceland; French Investigate Ionosphere by Michael Greenman, J03 \ On a large expanse of black volcanic sand, near the village of Skogar, in Southern Iceland, things are happening. A large corrugated metal shack springs up almost over- night, and strange antennae and mobile control trucks appear all around. Every couple of days a large balloon is released, rising to an altitude of 115,000 feet. A team of French technicians is continuously at work, preparing for the big day, Aug. 23. At midnight a "Dragon" (pronounced: Dragon), a 20 ft., two-staged, solid-fueled rocket, will soar 280 miles into the ionos-1^ phere. For the second year in a row, the CNES, or National Center for Space Study, a French agency under the control of the Secretary of State, has come to Iceland to study radiation in the Van Allen Belt. A total of 7 or 8 balloons will precede the rockets launch. Their purpose is to receive pre- liminary data which will provide a basis for analyzing the informa- tion gathered by the rocket. Release Balloon On the 23rd, the day of the launch, they will release a balloon sometime between zero minus 5 minutes, and zero minus 2Vz mi- nutes. This will be the final cri- teria on which they will base their decision to launch or not to launch. Information on the condi- tion of the earth's magnetic field (also criteria for the launch) will be received from professor Thor- bjorn Sigurgeirsson, in Reykjavik. A second rocket, to collect data for comparison, will be launched two days later. One of the interesting features of the launch itself is the final determination of the firing posi- tion. A small balloon, equipped with a radar reflector, is released minutes before the launch. It is tracked visually, and by radar, to House Sends Pay Package To President Congress completed action Aug. 12 on a $1 billion military pay oill and sent it to President John- son for signing. The House of Representatives completed action by voice vote, accepting Senate changes in the bill the House originally passed July 20. That eliminated any need for Senate-House conferences to work out differences. The Senate passed its bill Aug. 11 by a unanimous vote. The bill provides an 11 per cent across-the- board increase for enlisted per- sonnel with more than two years of service and six per cent for officers. Increases averaging 17.3 per cent are provided for enlisted personnel with less than two years of service. Officers in the same category would get an average increase of 22 per cent. The bill also adds $10 to the present $55 monthly combat pay and provides for free postage privileges to personnel serving in the Republic of Viet Nam. Reenlistment bonuses will also be increased to give personnel more incentive to make the mili- tary a career. The bill will become effective the first day of the month after it becomes law. (AFPS) SHOWTIME—Winthrop (Tom J. Rea) anticipates the wonders of the kids' band with his friend Amaryllis (Laurraine Crew) in Meredith Willson's "THE MUSIC MAN." For further details on the USO group currently touring IDF facilities, turn to page seven. In This Issue Arbaer Museum ...... pg. 2 Commissary .......... pg. 3 H-2 Feature ........ pgs. 4-5 Coast Guard .......... pg. 6 Movie Schedule........pg. 7 Sports................ pg. 8 Active Forces To Increase By 340,000 Addition of 340,000 personnel to the active forces will be com- pleted in about a year, officials have revealed. Some 300,000 will be added by July 1966 and 40,000 by October 1966. This does not mean all these will be required in the Republic of Viet Nam, it was pointed out. Current plans call for a 125,00- man force in Viet Nam, repres- enting a "hole" that must be filled elsewhere. The increased strength allows for personnel in transit be- tween assignments, training, and maintaining strengths for world- wide commitments. Secretary of Defense Robert S. McNamara recently said the per- sonnel ratio over the Viet Cong is three-to-one. He believes, as other U.S. officials do, this ratio is inadequate. A specific ratio has not been given, but estimates run as high as 10-1, which officials think ex- cessive, considering greater mo- bility and better equipment of U.S.-RVN forces. Increasing U.S. forces in RVN from 75,000 to 125,000 will create a more favorable ratio balance, officials believe, saying the Joint Chiefs of Staff agreed against calling up reserve during the re- cent build-up. Spokesmen point to re- serves as a "perishable commod- ity," meaning they are called up for a year, and if not needed for several months, their full poten- tial is not used. The objective in RVN, as previ- ously stated, is to convince the Viet Cong and the North Viet- Nam government they cannot achieve domination over the RVN. (AFPS) determine its speed of horizontal travel, and rate of vertical rise. Correct Trajectory The information received in this manner is fed into a com- puter, called: "Cotir" (correction de tir), or "correction of launch," which determines the correct launch attitude automatically, to assure that the rocket will follow the correct trajectory. All this is necessary because, as a rocket, such as the American "Aerobee," the "Dragon" has no flight con- trols. It is launched, and its stages fire when required, but it follows a path, like an artillery shell, based on its original firing position. A small stabilizing jet keeps the rocket in spin to main- tain an even flight. On the 23rd, the Icelandic Coast Guard will keep ships out of a designated area, and Ice- landic Air Control will warn air- planes to keep out of the sky. A mobile radar installation at Sko- gar will follow the rocket through its flight. DRAGON ON THE PAD — A French Rocket, the "Dragon," pre- pares to blast off to conduct ex- periments in the upper atmos- phere over Iceland. The scientific installation, near Skogar, is ready for the second year in a row, to delve into the mysteries of the Van Allen Belt, a ring of radiation that surrounds the globe.

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