The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 11.09.1965, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 11.09.1965, Blaðsíða 1
Albert Schweitzer Dead At 90 (Editor's Note: Dr. Albert Schweitzer, 90, died at his jungle Lambarene Hospital, French Equatorial Africa, Sunday, Sept. 5, a tired, overworked man. Nor- man Cousins, editor of of the Saturday Review, perhaps, best describes the humanitarian when he says in his book, Dr. Schweitzer of Lambarene, "The greatness of Schweitzer—indeed the essence of Schweitzer—is the man as a sym- bol. It is not so much what he has done for others, but what others have done because of him and the power of his example. This is the measure of the man. What has come out of his life and thought is the kind of inspiration that can animate a generation. He has sup- plied a working demonstration of reverence for life. He represents enduring proof that we need not torment ourselves about the nat- ure of human purpose. The scholar, he once wrote, must not live for science alone, nor the businessman for his business, nor the artist for his art. If affirma- tion of life is genuine, it will "de- mand from all that they should sacrifice a portion of their own lives for others." The following is in tribute to the great man.) The story of Dr. Schweitzer is that of a Twentieth Century Renaissance figure, a gifted scholar, musician, a theologian with a new, thoughtful approach to Christianity, whose several careers had, at the age of 30, made him a much-discussed in- tellect in Europe. Classic Renunciation With everything to lose, he turned his back on civilization in an act of classic renunciation; yet, in his decision to fight death and disease in the African jungle, he was engaging in a bold act of charity, implementing the Christ- ian principles he had defined in his "epoch-making" studies into the personality and significance of Christ. At the same time, he was com- mitting himself to a personal quest for the universal concept of ethics, for which yet another study—into the work of philo- sopher Immanuel Kant—had pre- pared him. The answer—Rever- ence for Life—which he found while travelling up the Ogowe River, he says, "through a herd of hippopotamuses," became the basis for an entire philosophy of civilization; as a moral keystone it captured the imagination of an age as perhaps no other single expression of a value system. Nobel Peace Prize Winner Since the publication in the United States of several books on him, an anthology, a deluge of magazine articles in 1946 and 1947, Schweitzer, the man, has as- sumed increasingly heroic pro- portions ; one news magazine, con- ferring its ultimate tribute, called him "the great man's great man." To many people, removed by thousands of miles from him, the 1952 Nobel Peace Prize winner has seemed the incarnation of con- science in a time that threatens destruction; his Lambarene hospi- tal, the fulfillment, in almost hel- lish, tropical circumstances of an ideal benevolence. "There in this sorry world of ours," the late Al- bert Einstein could say, "is a great man!" Aware Of Hardship Albert Schweitzer, born in Kayserburg, Alsace, Jan. 14, 1875, (Continued on page 8.) AFWL's Eighth Ranked Sea Service Newspaper - 1964 THE 'WHITE IFsJlcBCDim U.S. NAVAL STATION, KEFLAVIK INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT, ICELAND Volume IV, Number 33 Saturday, September 11, 1965 Possible 10.2 Per Cent Jump Committee Gives Nod To Boost In Cost Of Living Allowance The Pentagon's Per Diem Committee has voted to give military families living off- base overseas an average 10.2 per cent increase in their cost of living allowance portion of the station per diem. Service and Defense Department approval are still needed, however, but officials say chances look good for the raise to go through. The raise is based partly on the 1965 pay bill and partly on revisions in the cost of of living allowance (COLA) system. The latter revisions are based on recently published find- ings of the Bureau of Labor Statistics on how people spend their money. Followed Pay Hikes The main factor, however, is the raise. Similar raises followed the basic pay hikes of 1963 and 1964. The COLA hike was incor- porated with the changes in the tax structure brought about by the reduction in federal income tax. Even this factor, though, made the 1964 COLA increase minimal. The 1963 COLA raise was close to the proposed 10.2 per cent average increases. Exact rates by station and grade have not been released, but if approved at the Pentagon's top levels, they will be published in the Joint Travel Regulations. Equal Buying Power The new COLA will aim at giv- ing affected personnel increased buying power equal to that of stateside people. Often, persons who are unfa- miliar with COLA, say that when there is a pay increase the cost of living allowance should go down not up. But the purpose of the COLA is to give persons of like grade and length of service, who are in high-cost areas abroad, the same amount of disposable income as their counterparts stateside. CHECKING OUT CONTROLS—Rear Admiral Wesche, Danish Royal Navy's island commander of Greenland (left) sits in the cockpit of the 57th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron's F-102 jet aircraft. With him is Col. Alan G. Long, commander of Air Forces Iceland. The admiral stopped over recently at U.S. Naval Station, Keflavik, while on his way back to Greenland. Acting CPOs Go Permanent Acting appointments of chief petty officers are coming to an end in the Navy Nov. 1 and those presently in this status will be- come permanent CPOs at that time. The change was brought about through studies that showed the appointment to permanent CPO after the current 36-month pro- bationary period had become rou- tine. Certificates of permanent ap- pointment will be issued auto- matically to all advanced to E-7 as a result of Navy-wide examin- ations and at the request of the commanding officer, to men serv- ing as temporary warrant or com- missioned officers who are ad- vanced to pay grade E-7. Albert Schweitzer (1875-1965) Christmas Season Nearing; Santa Clans Greets Children Santa Claus took time out from his busy toy production schedule to welcome over 200 youngsters and their parents to Toyland last Saturday as Cdr Richard C. James, executive officer of the Naval Station, officially opened the store. More Merchandise Assistant Navy Exchange Offi- cer Ens O. J. Fiume said that Toyland has $50,000 or about 50 per cent more merchandise than last year. Bicycles, Christmas trees and dolls are items greatly increased over last year's commodities, he noted. After the doors were opened, children hurried into the huge quonset hut filled with toys of all sizes, shapes and descriptions. Many toddlers were seen looking the toys over and whispering into Santa's ear what they wanted for Christmas. Santa Will Be Back The Jolly Man from the North could only stay this first opening day at Toyland but promised to be back during October and De- cember. Store hours are as follows: Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday: 10 a.m. to 5:45 p.m.; Saturday 10 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. and on Wednesday and Sunday the store will be closed. SHIPS FOR FOUR—Gy. Sgt. Stanley E. Patten, USMC, takes the oath of reenlistment administered by American Ambassador to Iceland The Honorable James K. Penfield at the American Embassy in Reykja- vik Aug. 20. Also present for the occasion were (second left) J. Craw- ford Brooks, political officer and John D. Whiting, economic officer. Sergeant Patten is the non-commissioned officer in charge of the Marine security guard at the Embassy. He has accumulated 22 years of active service thus far.

x

The White Falcon

Beinir tenglar

Ef þú vilt tengja á þennan titil, vinsamlegast notaðu þessa tengla:

Tengja á þennan titil: The White Falcon
https://timarit.is/publication/382

Tengja á þetta tölublað:

Tengja á þessa síðu:

Tengja á þessa grein:

Vinsamlegast ekki tengja beint á myndir eða PDF skjöl á Tímarit.is þar sem slíkar slóðir geta breyst án fyrirvara. Notið slóðirnar hér fyrir ofan til að tengja á vefinn.