The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 17.09.1965, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 17.09.1965, Blaðsíða 1
AFWL's Eighth Ranked Sea Service Newspaper - 1964 THE WHITE IFfflUasdDim. U.S. NAVAL STATION, KEFLAVIK INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT, ICELAND Volume IV, Number 34 Friday, September 17, 1965 PROJECT FROM THE AIR—An aerial view shows the progress of the enlisted men's housing area. The six area complexes total 90 homes, with each complex containing two sixplex and one to two duplex units. Completion of all the units are planned by the end of the calendar year. Summer Repairs And Building Construction Highlight Naval Station's Face-Lifting The summer months have been busy ones for building, repairing, painting and re- vamping the buildings on base. The 100 pre-fabricated housing units for enlisted and officer personnel, which started in May, have taken shape. On Sept. 9, these three and four-bedroom structures completed the shell stage of con- struction. This erection includes the roof panels, floors, walls, the entire framing mem- bers and foundations plus the roofing material. What needs to be done is the installing of sewer, water, electric and fuel lines— outside, as well as, interior wir-^- ing, installation of fixtures, all plumbing, tiling, touch-up paint- ing and the repairing of all da- mage due to shipping and unload- ing. The exteriors of the sixplex and duplex units are pre-painted prior to shipping. The paint, although not baked on, has a similarity to plastic based paint. December Deadline The projected beneficial occup- ancy date is set for Dec. 6, 1965 at the enlisted personnel's housing area. It will be the first section on the left hand side of the road before approaching the Main Gate. This complex contains two duplex and two sixplex units. Nine barracks were maintained and repaired this summer. This amounted to $74,000. Contracted to Keflavik Contractors, the main jobs comprised of replacing the rain gutters, fixing broken win- dows and applying braces. Also, repairs were made on the roof panels and winter weather-proof- ing was accomplished. Mess Halls 749, 755 and 758 are in the process of being re- novated and repaired by the same contractors. These mess halls, when completed, should greatly improve efficiency and food ser- vice, say officials. This project is a $44,700 venture. Around The Area If one has noticed, several buildings have received freshly painted exteriors. Iceland Defense Force Headquarters Building, con- necting the Chapel Annex and the Post Office; the Station Hospital and the Navy Exchange Clothing Store are taking on bright colors ranging from white, green to (Continued on page 6.) NNA Newspapermen Plan Get - Acquainted Interview The Iceland Defense Force will be host to 70 members of the National Newspaper Association next Wednesday, Sept. 22. Highlighting the one-day visit will be a get-acquainted interview with Defense Force personnel whose homes are in the sphere of circulation of the NNA members. All personnel with homes in the states and cities listed below are invited to participate in this get-acquainted interview which will be held in the Polar Club. Purpose Of NNA The purpose of the NNA visit to Iceland is to enable these pub- lishers of relatively small news- papers to enjoy the type of brief- ing and interviews accorded large metropolitan daily newspapers with correspondents in various countries abroad. Representing some 7,500 news- papers throughout the United States, NNA has conducted study missions to various parts of the world. In the past, members of these study missions have inter- viewed such prominent world lead- ers as Prime Minister Nehru, Mayor Willy Brandt and other presidents and prime ministers in over 50 countries of the world. Following Visitors Invited Members of the present group publish newspapers in the follow- ing areas: Ogdensburg, N.Y.; Dans- ville, N.Y.; Princeton, 111.; Co- lumbus, Ohio; Middlesboro, Ky.; Osage, Iowa; Eustis, Fla.; Ogden, $¦ Iowa; Chico, Calif.; Stafford, Kan.; Chesterton, Ind.; Evans- ton, 111.; Fort Plain, N.Y.; Tap- pahannock, Va.; Louisville, Miss.; St. James, Minn.; Denver, Colo.; Brighton, Colo.; Geneva Nebr.; South Pasadena, Calif.; Union, N.J.; Blue Earth, Minn.; Sher- man Oaks, Calif.; Cleveland, Miss.; Madison, Wis.; Sidney, N.Y.; Northwood, Iowa; Breese, 111.; Hillsboro, Ore.; Newton, N.J.; Fillmore, Calif.; Tell City, Ind.; Washington, D.C.; Rock Rapids, Iowa; Wheaton, 111.; Kerrville, Tex. Navy Boot Camp Cut To 7 Weeks Navy recruit training at San Diego, Calif., and Great Lakes, 111., has been cut from nine to seven weeks. The shorter cycle results from adding more hours to weekly training schedules, an official said. (AFPS) Coast Guard Visits Naval Station Adm. E. J. Roland, commandant of the Coast Guard, and RAdm J. R. Scullion, chief of Office of Personnel, U.S. Coast Guard, stopped at Keflavik International Airport Sunday evening, Sept. 12, to inspect the Loran Station lo- cated on the Naval Base. Admiral Roland is bound for Paris where he will attend the Intergovernmental Maritime Consultative Organization (IMCO) Conference. *----------------------------------------------- To Inspect Loran Stations The Coast Guard's part in IMCO arises from that agency's concern with safety and rescue at sea. The Maritime Safety Commit- tee, a part of IMCO, standardizes rescue methods and signals around the world to facilitate and quicken rescue efforts. Admiral Scullion is flying to Paris with Admiral Roland but from there they will separate. Admiral Scullion will depart on an inspection tour of Coast Guard Loran Stations in the North At- lantic and Mediterranean areas. The party will rejoin forces at Copenhagen, Denmark, where an officer from Coast Guard Head- quarters in Washington, LCdr R. Nielsen, Jr., will receive a Ph.D. in Naval Engineering from the University of Copenhagen. From there, the two admirals will return to the United States. U.N. Agency The IMCO is an agency of the United Nations whose purpose is to "promote cooperation in techni- cal problems of international ship- ping and to encourage the removal of discriminatory action by gov- ernments and restrictive practices by shippers." This organization is a purely consultative and an advisory group. Representatives from vari- ous nations bring problems to the group for discussion. The conclu- sions are returned to the nation concerned and presented to the government as a suggestion. The agency convenes every two years. Military Men Pursue Studies Some 1,300 Army personnel earned college degrees in Fiscal Year 1965 with the Navy report- ing approximately 10,000 person- nel enrolled in college-level studies. The services differed in report- ing methods, with the Army show- ing completions and the Navy fi- gures reflecting enrollment. Air Force statistics are being com- piled. More than 50,000 sailors took high school or vocational courses, while 43,558 soldiers qualified for high school diplomas or equival- ency certificates during the re- porting period. Individual course completions for the Army's General Education- al Development Test (GED) pro- gram totaled more than 721,000. This includes 370,936 preparatory high school, 269,447 service job related, 10,425 high school subject area and 70,965 college course completions. .:.*»?:. ifc . STOPOVER—Adm E. J. Roland, commandant of the Coast Guard, and RAdm J. R. Scullion, chief of Personnel, U.S. Coast Guard, pause at Keflavik International Airport on their way to Paris where Ad- miral Roland is to attend the bi- annual meeting of the Integovern- mental Maritime Consultative Or- ganization. Congress Holds Hearings On Servicemen's Life Insurance Committee hearings are underway in Congress on a bill to provide active duty personnel with an inexpensive group life insurance program similar to the plan available to Federal employees. The bill, introduced by Rep. Robert A. Everett (D.- Tenn.), is being reviewed by the Defense Department and Veterans Administration (VA). $— While Mr. Everett's bill will of- fer an insurance program not available since 1957, officials ex- plained certain features of it are receiving close study and will prob- ably result in some changes which, if approved, will further benefit the serviceman and his dependents. Administered By VA The program would be adminis- tered by the VA and underwritten by private insurance companies. Under provisions of H.R. 10873, a policy purchased by the admini- strator would automatically insure any member of the uniformed ser- vice on active duty against death for $10,000 unless the individual elects in writing not to be in- sured under the program, or elects to be insured in an amount less than $10,000, which must be a multiple of $500 and not less than $1,000. Monthly Premiums In remarks for the Congress- ional Record, Mr. Everett noted that estimates indicate the group life insurance would be available at a monthly rate of about 25 to 35 cents per thousand. Actual pre- mium rates would be determined by the VA administrator with pay- ments deducted monthly from an individual's basic pay. The bill provides that personnel separated from the service would be given 31 days to convert the insurance and continue with one of the participating companies.

x

The White Falcon

Beinir tenglar

Ef þú vilt tengja á þennan titil, vinsamlegast notaðu þessa tengla:

Tengja á þennan titil: The White Falcon
https://timarit.is/publication/382

Tengja á þetta tölublað:

Tengja á þessa síðu:

Tengja á þessa grein:

Vinsamlegast ekki tengja beint á myndir eða PDF skjöl á Tímarit.is þar sem slíkar slóðir geta breyst án fyrirvara. Notið slóðirnar hér fyrir ofan til að tengja á vefinn.