The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 16.10.1965, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 16.10.1965, Blaðsíða 1
AFWL's Eighth Ranked Sea Service Newspaper - 1964 THE WHITE JlcecDirii U.S. NAVAL STATION, KEFLAVIK INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT, ICELAND Volume IV, Number 38 Saturday, October 16, 1965 Iceland, U.S. Observe Leif Erickson's Day Saturday, Oct. 9., two ceremonies, over 2,000 miles apart, honored the same man . . . Leif Erickson. Newport News, Va., and Reykjavik, Iceland, turned out to do homage to this man, who 1,000 years ago landed on North American soil, becoming the first European to do so. By the proclamation of President Johnson, and by the endorsement of Governor Albertus^ Harrison; Newport News, the CENTURIES APART — Boy scout from the Naval Base stand in front of the statue of Leif Erick- son, whose search for adventure this organization has embodied in its activities. They are (from 1 to r) A. W. Hayes, Scoutmaster, Willard Watson and Tony Owens. home of the Mariner's Museum, looked to the past, and found com- mon bonds with far-away Scand- inavia. Congressman Thomas Downing and the Icelandic Ambassador to the United States, IPetur Thor- steinsson, gave speeches during the ceremonies which included the laying of a wreath at the foot of a statue of Leif Erickson. The statue is a replica of the statue in Reykjavik presented to the people of Iceland by the United States. Worthwhile Suggestion Earn Cash Awards For Servicemen President Johnson has signed an act authorizing cash awards up to $25,000 to service personnel for suggestions, inventions or scientific achievements which benefit the go- vernment. It will be some time before each service can adopt re- spective programs to put award machinery into motion, an official said, but anyone making- a contribution now is eligible for consideration. Uniformed personnel are en- couraged to submit worthwhile contributions for evaluation und- er the new authorization. Money will be paid from ap- propriated funds similar to the program provided civil servants. Previously, some service personnel were granted cash awards in les- ser amounts from non-appropri- ated funds such as post or base exchange profits. The awards legislation was in- troduced by Rep. Richard S. Schweiker, R.-Pa. It gives reg- ulation authority for the new pro- gram to Secretary of Defense Ro- bert S. McNamara as it affects the Army, Navy, Marine Corps and Air Force. Similar authority is given to the Secretary of the Treasury for the Coast Guard. An additional authorization can be made by the President for "efficiency, economy, or other im- provement of operations of the Government of the United States." This means a person can receive an award for "service contribu- ton" and then be given a "Presi- dential" award, if both do not exceed the $25,000 limit. Only active service personnel are eligible. A person may receive the award after service separa- tion, if the contribution was made while on active duty. Should the contributor die, the money would go to a beneficiary. Anyone receiving a cash award will be required to waive rights for future legal action against the Government incolving such claims as patent or royalty rights. Nordic Kinship Governor Harrison sent a note to Newport News in which he said: "One of the great seafaring men in history, Leif Erickson, re- minds us of our kindship with Nordic people and of their con- tribution to our own heritage of freedom." He went on, "his like ness in Iceland and its counter- part at the Mariner's Museum in Virginia symbolize years of friendship between the U.S. and Scandinavia." In Reykjavik, in spite of the threatening weather, hundreds of people turned out to listen to Prime Minister Bjarni Benedikts- son and United States Ambassa- dor to Iceland, James K. iPen- field, do homage to the famous traveller from this land. Proud Heritage Mr. 'Penfield spoke highly of Leif Erickson, saying that: "He was a man who utilized his capa- cities to the fullest." The Am- bassador spoke of Leif's great ability and great drive, saying that these qualities have come down through the centuries in Iceland. "The Icelandic people could never have survived the rigors of the bad years, the cen- turies of isolation, the cruelties of nature, volcanic eruption, floods, cold, the plague, even the Barbary pirates unless they had possessed in full measure those (Continued on page 2.) Admiral Booth Ends Command Inspection VAdm Charles T. Booth, Commander Naval Air Force, U. S. Atlantic Fleet, took charge of the Command Inspec- tion at U. S. Naval Station, Keflavik, Iceland and conducted a Personnel Inspection, Oct. 8, at 9 a.m. in Hangar 831. The Admiral was escorted during the inspection by Capt Emile E. Pierre, Jr. and Cdr Richard C. James, the com- manding and executive officers of the Naval Station. Admiral Booth had arrived at"^ Keflavik, Tuesday, Oct. 12, at 5:30 p.m. and was greeted by RAdm Ralph Weymouth, Iceland Defense Force commander and Captain Pierre as well as other officials. Admiral Booth Speaks After the inspection, the Ad- miral spoke to the officers and men. He said: "I am one of those many people who have so many times been to Keflavik but only passing through, only enjoying the service afforded their air- planes and the crews of the air- planes and their own comfort, but never to find out why that ser- vice is so good... ." "So, I can tell you that I am very happy to be able to be here, and to spend a couple of days to see why it works so well, see who's doing it, and understand how that is." Congratulates Men Admiral Booth said that he was very pleased with the inspection, that "you look as though you have all the spirit in the world." He congratulated the men of the Naval Station, saying that they looked as though they had con- fidence in themselves, and their jobs and are doing their job well. The Admiral attended a formal dinner and reception at the Offi- cers' Club Wednesday evening prior to his scheduled departure for Argentia, Newfoundland, Oct. 14. The Personnel Inspection con- cluded the five-day Command In- spection for the Naval Station which began Oct. 8 at noon. Inspectors Arrive The first contingent of the Command Inspection Team con- sisted of approximately" 28 offi- cers, several enlisteds and civilian inspector personnel headed by Capt W. A. Kiernan, assistant chief inspector of the Command Inspection. Upon the team's arrival Oct. 8, a ten o'clock briefing was held at the Officers' Club Main Ball- room. At the briefing, Captain Pierre spoke about the various roles, duties and functions of the U.S. Naval Station in Iceland. Five-Day Inspection After the briefing, the base's inspection got underway as each of the Naval Station's depart- ments were examined and visited including their divisions and sec- tions. The inspectors spent from noon, last Friday until Monday evening looking over the base before leav- ing Keflavik for Argentia, Tues- day, at 7 a.m. via C-121 aircraft. ADMIRAL SPEAKS—Terminating the Command Inspection of the Naval Station was the speech gi- ven by VAdm Charles T. Booth, Commander Naval Air Force, U. S. Atlantic Fleet, during the Pers- onnel Inspection held Oct. 13 at 9 a.m. in Hangar 831. Scientists Answer Question: 'Is There Life On Mars?' AIR MARSHALL VISITS—Iceland Defense Force's Air Forces Ice- land (AFI) was toured Oct. 4 through 6 by one of NATO's top ech- elon officials, Air Marshall Sir Paul Holder (second from right), Royal Air Force (RAF), Northwood RAFB, England. Air Marshall Holder is the Commander, Maritime Air, Eastern Atlantic Area which is under Commander-in-Chief, Eastern Atlantic (CINCEASTL- ANT). Pictured with the Air Marshall (left to right) at the 57th Fighter Interceptor Sq (57th FIS) Alert Barn are his aide; Col. Alan G. Long, AFI commander; and Lt. Col. Joe H. Joiner, com- mandant of the 57th FIS. by Mike Greenman Is there life on Mars? Can life come from organic chemicals under conditions such as existed during the earth's formative cen- turies? These are the questions that Dr. Cyril IPonnam Peruma, a chemist, and Dr. Richard Young, a biologist, both of NASA are trying to answer. On Oct. 5, these two men, along with Dr. Irving Breger, a geo- chemist from the Geological Sur- vey of the Department of the Interior appeared on Armed Forces Television to discuss these questions. They had spent a day on the volcanic island of Surtsey, searching for "evidence of organic synthesis as it might have occured on the primitive earth." Dr. Young said, "We feel that if we can find such evidence and be certain, that it's abiogenic synthesis, that is, synthesis with- out the presence of life, then this may contribute a great deal to our understanding of how life could have orginated on this planet, or somewhere else." Dr. Ponnam-Peruma described laboratory conditions that have been set up to duplicate as closely as possible the conditions that ex- isted on the primitive earth's sur- face. Simulated Elements In a glass container lightning is simulated by an electric dis- charge, radioactivity by using a linear accelerator which shoots out electrons, volcanoes by passing heated gasses through the con- tainer. They even can simulate "something like what happens when a meteorite strikes an atom- osphere, and the shock wave pro- duced in the impact." What is the result of these lab- oratory experiments? "In every one of these cases we have found the molecules which go to make up the important molecules in life." Discounts Pictures Dr. Young discussed the possi- bility of life on Mars. He dis- counted the pictures taken by Mariner IV as proving anything, since: "if we were to take a photo- graph of the earth from the same satellite, we wouldn't have detected (Continued on page 6.)

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