The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 22.10.1965, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 22.10.1965, Blaðsíða 1
Navy Day Coming Oct. 27 AFWL's Eighth Ranked Sea Service Newspaper - 1964 THE WHITE Dallas awm. U.S. NAVAL STATION, KEFLAVIK INTERNATIONAL AIRPOItT, ICELAND Volume IV, Number 39 Friday, October 22, 1965 Life Insurance Policies Start With Oct. Pay Two dollars are being deducted from the October pay of more than 2.7 million service personnel as a premium for $10,000 group life insurance coverage. It was previously reported that $4 would be deducted for cover- age during October and Novem- ber. Decision For Change The decision for the change in payroll deductions was made by the Department of Defense and the Veterans Administration "since the larger withholding may have affected the budget of low- ranking personnel." However, individuals retaining $10,000 insurance coverage will have an additional $2 deducted the the last month of service to pro- vide the full coverage. Further Details A fact sheet explaining details of the new group life insurance has been compiled by the Director- ate for Armed Forces Information and Education and will be distri- buted throughout the military services. As it now stands, $10,000 cover- age is provided through an auto- matic payroll deduction of $2 a month. An individual may take action to reduce coverage to $5,000 for $1 a month or, where personal circumstances do not indicate the need for such insurance, elect to cancel the coverage. (AFPS) Christmas Mailing Time Is Here Christmas gifts for Armed Forces personnel overseas should be mailed between Oct. 21 and Nov. 10. Air mail items should be mailed prior to Dec. 10. Mailers are urged to mail their gifts early to minimize the possibilities of non-delivery before Christmas day. (NAVNEWS) Youth Center Registrations Youth Center registration will be held Oct. 23 between 1:30 and 5 p.m. at the Youth Center. All children from 6 to 19 years of age who desire to participate in Youth Center activities must register with their parents. U.S. Navyman — Symbol Of Security, Nation's Strength In Seapower The U.S. Navy in 1965 is more necessary than ever to the security of the United States and to keeping the peace. The Navy's strength—men and ships—is on the increase, and the Navy is receiving an increasing share of the defense budget. For 189 years the Navy has played a major role in national defense and has been an obvious and on-the-scene factor in the many confrontations of power since the end of the World War II. The Navy has a unique capability to respond to such international situations with just the appro- priate application of power. Because of this capability, the Navy is a significant instrument of U.S. national policy. In a relatively few years there hasbeen a host of international situations and conflicts where seapower has played a major or dominant role: Korea, Viet Nam, Laos, Cuba, Quemoy, Lebanon and the Dominican Republic are a few such instances. With the virtually invulnerable fleet ballistic submarine weapons system—Polaris—the Navy provides a nuclear deterrent against holocaust, while the Navy's general purpose forces enable Americans to meet lesser challenges without sacrifice of their national interest. iS&Vr. Importance Of The Man Today in South East Asia is another classic example of unique application of seapower. In Viet Nam the Navy/Marine Corps team, plus Naval logistical support, all continue to prove that the Navy's traditional general purpose role is as essential today as it was twenty years ago. Nonetheless, sophisticated technology has not been able to eliminate the need for what continues to be the Navy's most essential weapons system—The U.S. Navy Man. The Navy Day theme, "The U.S. Navy—Mark of a Man," indicates that the Navy's greatest con- cern is with its people. The Secretary of the Navy and the Chief of Naval Operations have reiterated this theme on many occasions. Navy men have a proud tradition of heroism in all wars. In battle in Viet Nam today, Navy and Marine Corps men add daily to this great naval tradition of heroism. But the Navy is composed as well of "unsung" heroes who by their patriotism and personal sacrifice are doing their part to uphold the security of the United States throughout the world. The sea is an inhos- pitable environment. It is destructive. Merely going to sea requires courage, dedication, daring and a great ability not only to live with the sea, but to control the oceans to insure the freedom of the seas. Navy men get insufficient credit for the job they do. Navyman's Challenge Today The general public sees them arrive in port, clean and eager, and it sees them depart, arrayed neatly at quarters. The public also sees sailors enjoying liberty—but by the nature of the sailor's life, the public never sees him in his arduous, dangerous, and prolonged duties aboard ship. A man-of-war's man in 1965 meets tremendous challenges—radiomen, catapult crews, plane handlers on the ships off Viet Nam have averaged 130 working hours per week continuously for ten weeks at a stretch. To insure the freedom of the seas, Navymen endure stress, cramped quarters, long separations, dangerous opera- tions, and minimum of comfort. The sea and the Navy is a man's job. While startling advances in weapons systems are made, such advances only emphasize and increase the dependence on man himself—a man marked by increased education, better training, and the advant- ages of experience. Because of the increasingly complex weapons systems which a seagoing man must operate and maintain, the Navy today provides education and training—particularly in the fields of electronics and data processing—far beyond that which industry or civilian schools can usually provide. Navy training also means real and meaningful responsibility at an early age. Training, responsibility, and the patriotism to devote our service to our country are all the mark of a Navy man. (September 1965 — Direction) Nitze Outlines Navy's Study In Key Rates Simply stated, the Navy's re- tention problem is its inability to retain adequate numbers of qualified and career minded offi- cers and enlisted men in certain key rates and ranks. Because of the low retention, one third of the Navy is involved in training as instuctors or students. Key Men Needed Because Navy training is con- sidered good, Navy petty officers with critical skills are in great demand in America's expanding economy, and this aggravates the problem of retaining men with the key skills. The Secretary of the Navy, Paul H. Nitze, recog- nizing the seriousness of the Navy's personnel dilemma, is placing great personal emphasis and effort this area. To assist him, he has convened a policy board of Navy/Marine Corps officers, Department of De- fense officials, and a working Task Force of carefully selected senior Navy and Marine Corps officers who are examining in great de- tail the problem of retention. Recommendations Planned This Task Force is preparing recommendations for improvement which, it is hoped, will enhance the Navy's personnel position with U.S. industry and other com- petitors in the U.S. Navy man- power hunt. The fleet is caught in the vicious cycle, this austerity in manning has led to long work hours, frustrating demands, and finally to low retention. (September 1965 — Direction) Free Mail Rates For Servicemen The House of Representatives has passed a bill calling for free air mail privileges for service per- sonnel in designated hostile act- ion areas and for those hospital- ized as a result of such action. The bill specifies that first-class letter mail, including postal and post cards, shall be carried as air mail at no cost to the sender. Other provisions call for rate adjustments on air mail parcel post pertaining to packages ad- dressed to, or mailed by service personnel in designated areas. Certain personnel of friendly foreign nations may also receive the free air mail privilege. (AFPS) WHITE FALCON Deadline Mondays—8 a.m.

x

The White Falcon

Beinir tenglar

Ef þú vilt tengja á þennan titil, vinsamlegast notaðu þessa tengla:

Tengja á þennan titil: The White Falcon
https://timarit.is/publication/382

Tengja á þetta tölublað:

Tengja á þessa síðu:

Tengja á þessa grein:

Vinsamlegast ekki tengja beint á myndir eða PDF skjöl á Tímarit.is þar sem slíkar slóðir geta breyst án fyrirvara. Notið slóðirnar hér fyrir ofan til að tengja á vefinn.