The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 29.10.1965, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 29.10.1965, Blaðsíða 1
AFWL's Eighth Ranked Sea Service Newspaper - 1964 THE WHITE U.S. NAVAL STATION, KEFLAVIK INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT, ICELAND Volume IV, Number 40 Friday, October 29, 1965 '¦:vXv!vX-:-:-:-:oL":':-:vr- DEFENSE COUNCIL—The six members of the Iceland Defense Council gather in the office of Com- mander, Iceland Defense Force, RAdm Ralph Weymouth, during one of their meetings. Left to right are Mr. H. Olafsson, Capt E. E. Pierre, Jr., Mr. H. Helgason, Mr. H. Dalberg, Cdr J. E. Haines and Cdr H. Hoag. (See story on page 5). RAdm Weymouth Congratulates September's Men Of Month The Sailor, Marine and Airman of the Month for Septem- ber were personally congratulated by RAdm Ralph Weymoth, Commander, Iceland Defense Force, during ceremonies in his office Oct. 22. Chosen by selection boards representing their respective services, the men were presented certificates of recognition and checks for $25 along with the best wishes of Admiral Weymouth. September's Sailor of the Month,*'' Yeoman Third Class Robert W. Brehmer, is attached to Detach- ment Thirteen of Patrol Squadron Twenty-One (VP-21). He distingu- ished himself as the administra- tive petty officer of his squadron. A native of Delanco, N. J., Petty Officer Brehmer graduated from Riverside High School in River- side, N. J., prior to entering the Navy. Before coming to Keflavik. he was stationed with his squad- ron at Naval Air Station, Bruns- wick, Maine. Petty Officer Brehm- er's many hobbies include reading, modelcraft, painting and sports. Private Cox ¦Another sports enthusiast, as well as hunting and fishing is the Navy Cancels Draft; Enlistments Up 40% A Defense Department report shows that there have been large increases in voluntary enlistments since the draft was raised sharply in July. Monthly figures for July, Aug- ust and September disclosed in- creases ranging from thirty-two percent or 39,739 enlistees in the Air Force to forty-five percent for the Marines which brought in 17,239 recruits. Comparing July and Septem- ber figures, 34,176 volunteers re- ceived by the Army was a forty- six percent jump and the Navy increased its enlistments by forty- one percent or 40,588 men. The Navy also announced that it was cutting its October draft call in half and the November Navy draft request for 4,000 was cancelled. (AFRTS). Marine of the Month, Private First Class Dannie E. Cox. Private Cox is the Guard Chief Clerk at the Marine Barracks. He is from Greenville, S. C, where he gradu- ated from Carolina High School before entering the service. Priv- ate Cox has his sights set on col- lege when he finishes his tour with the Marine Corps. This is his first duty station following re- cruit training at Parris Island, S. C. Airman Morgan Newly promoted Airman First Class Donald E. Morgan received the honors as Airman of the Month. Airman Morgan is a Com- munications Center Specialist and operates teletype and telephone switchboards for the 932nd Air- craft Control and Warning Squadron. He is a native of Roan Mountain, Tenn., where he gradu- ated from Cloudland High School. He was last stationed at Ells- worth Air Force Base in South Dakota. Don't Go It Alone Family problems constantly nagging you? Write to the American Social Health As- sociation, 1790 Broadway, New York, New York, (USA), for helpful materials on family liv- ing. Give today to ASHA in your American Overseas Campaign. In This Issue Chaplain's Corner .... pg. 2 Safety Awards........pg. 3 Toastmasters Club .... pg. 4 Sports................pg. 6 Entertainment ........ pg. 8 Early Outs For Holidays Not Likely The customary early release for personnel due for separation over the Christmas-New Year holidays will not occur this year, accord- ing to officials. Suspension of the early out was necessitated because of the man- power buildup and the situation in the Republic of Viet-Nam. Service officials also said that leave policies over the holiday peri- od will be set by local commanders and will depend on operational re- quirements. (AFPS) Only U.S. Products Exempted From Duty Iceland Defense Force personnel planning to send Cristmas gifts home should become familiar with the appropriate customs regula- tions, officials have advised. While abroad service personnel can send gifts valued at $10 or less, duty-free to persons in the United States. Value is determined by the fair retail price of artic- les in the country where pur- chased. No Limit Sending Gifts There is no limit on the num- ber of gifts that may be sent. The value of such shipment or mail package received by one person in one day must not ex- ceed $10. Shipments or mail packages must contain bonafide gifts. A violation occurs when a person purchases something for himself and mails it home for safekeeping. Also, expensive purchases may not be broken into individual $10 shipments for mailing. An ex- ample would be a set of china. Acting Deputy Commissoner of Customs L. P. Johnson warns, "The purchase of an article at a military exchange store does not extempt it from duty. If an article is exempt from duty under some provision of law, such as item 800.00, Tariff Schedules of the United States, which permits the free importation of American made goods, then such article, al- though purchased at a military exchange store, may be imported free of duty." (AFRTS) Iceland's Highway Opens To Keflavik Iceland's first paved inter-city highway opened Tuesday, Oct. 26, between Reykjavik and Keflavik. The Minister of Agriculture and Traffic Ingolfur Jonsson officially opened the road by being the first to play his toll at the tollgate, located close to Straumur south of Hafnar- f jordur. He then set off on the trip to Keflavik. Time saved by using the new^ road amounts to about half of what it took to travel between the two cities on the old dirt road. All the concrete used in the con- struction of the highway came over dirt roads from Akranes west of Reykjavik. Over the last five years, the first one half was completed and then after a lapse of time, the second half. Dec. 10 Deadline For Air Mail From U. S. For Christmastime The mailing period for sending Christmas parcels and greeting cards overseas has been announc- ed by Post Office officials. Packages and cards going by surface mail should be posted by Nov. 10. Air mail should be de- posited between Dec. 1—10. These dates apply to parcels and cards going overseas to and from the United States, an official in Washington said, to insure deli- very in time for the holiday. Package contents should be firmly packed with nothing loose inside, the official explained, ad- ding, it is wise to put an additional address slip inside the package. Officials also recommend that containers be of strong material, tied with heavy cord. Fibreboard packaging, such as cardboard boxes, should be wrapped in paper even though this is not a strict requirement. Customs regulations apply to some items being mailed overseas. Some countries also prohibit vari- ous items and U.S. regulations prohibit certain other items. Local postal officials can give advice on these matters, a spokesman said. (AFPS) ---------------¦ m ¦ — What's A Deadline? Deadlines, those bugbears for newspaper editors, are also rough on contributors. Every newspaper must work against a deadline, some more lenient than others. The White Falcon is printed commercially in Reykjavik and its deadline must, of necessity, be early. Al- though the Station newspaper bears a Friday deadline, Monday morning is the cutoff time for nearly all stories. The copy is sent to the printer on Monday and Tuesday after- noons. Articles and pictures re- ceived in the White Falcon office (Bldg. T-44) by noon Monday stand a much better chance of good placement and larger play than those that come in any later. It is to the advantage of the contributor to get articles in as soon as possible. The toll charge is 40 kronur (round trip) for passenger cars under 2,425 lbs. and pick-up trucks with a carrying capacity under 992 lbs. Passenger cars with a weight over 2,425 lbs., pick- up trucks with a carrying capacity over 992 lbs. and trucks under 1.5 tons carrying capacity will pay 50 Kronur (round trip). According to a NavStaKef Notice 4640, operators of military vehic- les (VL plates) who are on official business can obtain a toll ticket from the Transportation Division Public Works Department. The ticket will be given to the toll collector instead of the cash pay- ment. The Notice states, "Operators of military vehicles (VL plates) will (1) immediately prior to de- parture, obtain a toll ticket from the Transportation Division, Pub- lic Works Department, (2) in the event the trip is scheduled outside of regular duty hours obtain the toll ticket from the Transporta- tion Duty Section (phone 3130), Building T-501, (3) return unused toll tickets to the issuing office no later than the day following its issuance." Only vehicles that have VL plates are authorized toll tickets. The tickets will not be issued to operators of privately owned vehi- cles (JO plates), whether the travel is on personal or official business. I A DEMON?—Children throughout the world will be disguised again this Sunday in the traditions of Halloween. Halloween parties will be given on the Naval Station and youngsters will be going from door to door saying, "Trick or treat." Motorists are advised to be especially careful and watchful of "hideous-looking creatures" lurk- ing the streets Sunday night. (See story on page 5).

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