The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 03.12.1965, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 03.12.1965, Blaðsíða 1
SAR TEAM—the crewmembers of the helicopter after they returned from the rescue mission. From left to right, they are R. S. Rogers, AD2; O. G. Fiveash, AM3; LCdr Richard J. T. Wood; Lt Fred Shirley and A. B. Guntner, HM3. Naval Station Helicopter Rescues , Lost Icelandic Police Officer A Naval Station helicopter crew succeeded in rescuing Johann Love, an Icelandic Policeman, Wednesday, Nov. 23, when he became lost in a snowy area North East of Thingvellir. Mr. Love had become separated from his hunting party on Nov 21, where they had been hunting Ptarmigan, an Icelandic bird. The Iceland Search and Rescue*?" Team began combing the area immediately after Love was re- ported lost. The team had no suc- cess for the first three days. Dur- ing this time, two planes and a helicopter from the Naval Sta- tion assisted the team of approxi- mately 200 men. Two Teams Meet On Wednesday, Nov. 23, LCdr Richard J. T. Wood left the Air- port in a helicopter at 8 a. m. and headed for Reykjavik to pick up Johannes Briem and Thorhallur Maube, members of the Iceland Search and Rescue Team. The copter then headed north and located the search party who were looking for Mr. Love. Com- mander Wood was given a map and advised as to which area he should search. Ten minutes later, Mr. Love was seen waving his arms at them. Builds Cave He had built himself a snow cave to stay warm, but was very weak from lack of food. Hospital Corpsman Third Class A. B. Guntner, who was on board the helicopter checked him over and found him in surprisingly good shape. The helicopter then flew back to Reykjavik where it landed on the hospital lawn. There, Mr. Love was greeted by members of the Reykjavik police force who had come te see their lost colleague. AFWL's Eighth Ranked Sea Service Newspaper - 1964 THE WHITE aUcECDini U.S. NAVAL STATION, KEFLAVIK INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT, ICELAND Volume IV. Number 45 Friday, December 3, 1965 Service ^Elves' Answer Santa's Mail One of the most difficult tasks that Santa Claus has to face from year to year is answering all the mail that floods his tiny North Pole office each December. Once again he will have plenty of help with the mail bag though, thanks to Air Force volunteers at the far-northern base at Eielson, Alaska. For the 11th consecutive Christ- * mas, military and civilian mem- bers of all the services can make sure their children get a real let- ter from Santa Claus, postmarked "Santa Claus House, North Pole." Off Duty Project The Santa letter program is an off-duty project of the Air Weath- er Service's Detachment 1, 55th Weather Reconnaissance Sq. During the past 10 years, WASTEBASKET ANTICS—Earl Nickel shows how a wastepaper basket can be used as an echo chamber. (See Story on Page 7.) Santa's unofficial weatherman helpers have remailed more than 60,000 letters to service kids around the world. And, as cold winds began to blow, the weathermen said they are ready for the 1965 crop of mail. Here is the way the letter program works. You write a letter to your child, signing it Santa Claus. Address the letter to your youngster and affix the proper return Air Mail postage from Alaska. Santa's Mail Bag Place the letter or letters in a large envelope and address it to Santa's Mail Bag, care of Detach- ment 1, 55th Weather Reconnais- sance Sq., APO Seattle 98737. Add proper Air Mail postage and drop it in a mailbox. A few miles from Eielson AFB is a post office officially called Santa Claus House, North Pole, Alaska. When the volunteer AWS mailmen get your letter, they will remail the Santa letter from this post office. Letter From Santa A few days later, your child will receive his or her letter from Santa, complete with authentic postmark. A deadline of Dec. 15 has been set for mailing letters to Santa's Mail Bag, to permit receipt of the remailed letters by Christmas Day. Parents at Keflavik Airport taking advantage of this Air Force program should send their letters a few days earlier than Dec. 15 to assure receipt before Christmas. Check New Car Contracts For Catches If you go out looking at the new cars you, will probably find that dealers emphasize that they are bigger and better this year, have more power, more accelera- tion, etc. That's all well and good. But before you sign up for one, remember that "acceleration" is just one of several things you had better think carefully about. A frequent provision found in installment contracts is the ac- celeration clause. Briefly, such a clause stipulates that when you fail to make one installment pay- ment, the entire amount remain- ing unpaid on the contract be- comes due and payable. The use of the acceleration clause (perfectly legal) points up that you should know the contents of the contract you sign. The man who consults the legal assistance office after he has signed a con- tract is like the driver who checks his fuel gauge after he has run out of gas—they're both too late. (NavNews) Citizenship Test Scheduled For TV You'll get your chance to test your knowledge of American government on Wednesday, Dec. 15, at 7:30 p.m. when AFTV channel 8 will present "Citi- zenship Test." Test forms will be printed in next week's White Falcon and will also be avail- able at building T-44, the radio and TV station. Don't miss this chance to take the test; you may not get another one. Call 4IS6 FLY-BY—Base personnel were privileged to view a practice fly-by by the aircraft of the 57th Fighter Interceptor Sq., Nov. 29. Eleven F-102 Delta Daggers zoomed low over the station in close formations. (Photo by Nolan, SN, (aircraft); Betz, PH3, (background) War On Waste Reaps Many Benefits; More On The Way Last week, the Naval Station's month-long War On Waste officially came to a close but the effects are still showing and being felt throughout the command. During the 30-day all out drive to cut costs through suggestions by you, over 100 suggestions were submitted for consideration. The Chaplains Office and the Industrial Relations Office had 100% on participation in the sugges- tion program. Out of the suggestions that^ have been reviewed to date, half of them were found to be imprac- ticable for implementation or else already instituted. The 50% that passed the initial review by the investigating board have been turned back to the field for further study of their practi- cal benefit or savings to the gov- ernment. Suggestions presently under close scrutiny cover not only the areas of cutting costs but also many ideas to improve conditions and facilities that promote morale. On the local level, six sugges- tions for use here on the com- mand level have been adopted and cash awards will be forthcoming. Five ideas that can be utilized in the Navy throughout the world have been forwarded to the appropriate bureaus in Washing- ton for a more comprehensive in- vestigation and completely quali- fied decisions. Even though the War On Waste Campaign is officially closed, this does not take away your oppor- tunity to receive cash awards for worthwhile ideas and suggestions. Look around you and you'll prob- ably see something that could be improved. Submit that idea to your division officer or the Indus- trial Relations Office today. In This Issue Vietnam Editorial . . pg. Your Personnal Affairs ........ pg. OMD Feature ...... pgs. Sports ............ pg. USO Show ........ pg. 3 4,5 6 7

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