The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 17.12.1965, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 17.12.1965, Blaðsíða 1
AFWL's Eighth Ranked Sea Service Newspaper - 1964 THE WHITE ?ffllE(IS(IDirD.. U.S. NAVAL STATION, KEFLAVIK INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT, ICELAND Volume IV. Number 47 Friday, December 17, 1965 Two Akmen Save Runaway F-102 Plane Two airmen, assigned to the 57th Fighter Interceptor Squadron, who prevented serious damage to an F-102 Delta Dagger when it spun around in heavy winds, were cited recently by Lt. Col. Joe H. Joiner, commander of the 57th FIS. Receiving Certificates of Recognition for their action in preventing the aircraft from sliding into nearby equipment were A1C David D. Olesen, who^ returned to the U.S. this week, and A2C Ramon Cordero. Both are aircraft mechanics assigned to the squadron. Wind Loosens Wheel Chock The two were refueling the plane during high winds when the right wheel chock slipped allow- ing the aircraft to pivot and loosen the other chock. Airman Cordero, who was at the aircraft, hurried into the cockpit and applied the brakes. Olesen raced from the fuel. truck and quickly replaced the chocks even though the aircraft had not come to a complete stop. Save Serious Damage In recounting the incident, the airmen stated that the wind would have certainly pushed the plane into the truck and ground power equip- ment if it had not stopped imme- diately. The certificates, signed by Col- onel Joiner, lauded the two for fast-thinking action and conclud- ed, "... .prompt action prevented possible serious damage to life and property and is in the best tradi- tion of the Air Force." WANT TO BUY A TREE, MIS- TER?—Scout Paul Pietryka dis- plays one of the Christmas trees his troop is selling. (Photo by Betz, PH3) Buy A Prime Tree; Scouts Have Them The trees are here and the Boy Scouts of the Keflavik troop are selling them as long as they last. Due to an overshipment of 300 trees, there will be enough so that everyone can purchase one. The hours of selling are 3 p. m. to 8 p. m., daily and 9 a. m. to 9 p. m., Saturday. So hurry on over to Building T-727A, the old pack- age store, across from the CPO Mess Hall, and get yours. The trees were cut and shipped here by the boys of the Argentia, Newfoundland, Boy Scout Troop. Profits for the tree sales will be divided between the two troops to finance their activities for the coming year. This is not charity but the sale of prime trees. They'll be sold on a first come, first served basis. So don't procrastinate; get yours now. SLEEVES SEEM HEAVIER—Capt Emile E. Pierre, Jr., commanding officier of the Naval Station, compares sleeves with LCdr Fred E. Shirley on the latter's promotion conducted Dec. 10 in the Captain's office. Commander Shirley is the Air Terminal Division officer of the Air Operations Department. (Photo by Betz, PH3) DOD Planning To Deactivate 16 U. S. Bases These are the proposed 16 ac- tions of military bases to be closed or abandoned. They are subject to a Congressional review, that will be presented to the Armed Services Committees of Congress on Jan. 10, 1966. -These actions are to be reported to the committees in accordance with Section 611 of FY66 Military Construction Authorization Act. No closures of bases affected by the actions will take place until 30 days after the Jan. 10 report. The actions to affect these particular bases and closing dates are as follows: Sandford, Fla.,—Naval Aviation Training Mission, Naval Air Station (NAS), Sanford, by July 1968. NATM to be transferred to Turner AFB, Ga. Albany, Ga.,—822nd Air Divi- sion, 484th Bomber Wing, 824th Bombardment Squadron and sup- porting units at Turner AFB inactivated by July 1967. Columbus, Ind.,—930th and 931st Troop Carrier Groups (C-119), Bakalar AFB, by October 1967. Boston, Mass.,—Boston Army Base between January 1967 to end of 1969. Kinross, Mich.,—438th Fighter Interceptor Squadron, Kincheloe AFB, relocated to Wurtsmith AFB by July 1969; 449th Bombardment Wing and supporting units will inactivate by October 1970. Portsmouth, N. H.,—Naval Hospital, Seavey's Island, by June 1973; Naval Disciplinary Com- mand, Portsmouth, by January 1969. Roswell, N. M.,—6th Strategic Air Command (SAC) Bomb Wing, Walker AFB, by July 1967. Youngstown, Ohio,—C-119 Air Reserve 910th Troop Carrier Group, Youngstown Municipal Airport, by October 1967. Burns Flat, Okla.,—70th Bomb Wing of SAC, Clinton-Sherman AFB, by July 1970. Portland, Ore.,—460th FIS, Portland International Airport, by April 1966. Smyrna, Tenn.,—Sewart AFB by July 1970; its TAC Commands re- located to other AFBs. El Paso, Tex.,—95th Bomb Wing of SAC, Biggs AFB, by July 1966. Genoa, Tex.,—924th and 925th Troop Carrier Air Reserve Groups, Ellington AFB, by October 1967. Waco, Tex.,—12th Air Force Headquarters relocated to Berg- strom AFB, Austin; leased facili- ties by July 1968. San Juan, Puerto Rico,—Army Antilles Command, Puerto Rico, and Ft. Buchanan, San Juan, by December 1966. (AFNB) HONORS FOR SEC DEF—Secretary of Defense Robert S. McNamara walks through an Air Force honor guard at Anderson AFB, Guam, on the final leg of a tour that took him to London, Paris and South- east Asia. During his stop at the base, the Secretary talked with B-52 crews andviewed a display of weapons being used against the Viet Cong in the Republic of Vietnam. (AFNB) 149 Activities Affected by DOD; SAC Bases To Be Hit Hardest Additional details on the 149 actions to consolidate, re- duce or discontinue Department of Defense (DOD) activi- ties in the United States and overseas have been announced by Secretary of Defense Robert S. McNamara. Military activities in 39 states and the District of Col- umbia are affected by 126 actions. The remaining 23 affect overseas activities, including one^ in Puerto Rico. Secretary McNamara said the majority of the actions result from basic force level and wea- pons systems changes which re- quire the realignment of military forces and which permit the future consolidation, reducting or discon- tinuance of military facilities. Remainder of actions continue to emphasize consolidation of rel- ated and joint use of facilities among the military departments, he said. Principal Actions Principal actions announced by the secretary include: The basic bomber to force and the basic structure of the Strate- gic Air Command are to be adjust- ed while maintaining the required strategic nuclear capability. This will be accomplished by phasing out of the inventory older models of the B-52 bombers and all B-58 bombers. Six major base actions involved, along with realignment of bomber force, will result in annual savings of $127.5 million. Certain other bases, from which B-52 operations are being removed, are being re- tained for a new mission which will be disclosed later. A comprehensive study of the Continental Air Defense and Early Warning System has been completed which will permit a re- duction in activities at Air Force Air Defense Bases. In addition, the reduced Soviet bomber threat and the technologi- cal advances in early warning de- tection systems, will permit the dis- continuation of the Navy's sea- ward airborne extension of the DEW LINE, frequently called Barrier Forces. Discontinuing Part Of NIKE Sites The reduced bomber threat also permits discontinuance of a num- ber of NIKE-Hercules anti-air- craft batteries. These actions will produce total savings of ?150.7 million annually. The Air Force will reduce eight Air Force Reserve and three Air Guard airlift squadrons in nine locations in the United States. This will save $28.2 million annu- ally. Department of the Army ac- tions in Puerto Rico will bring annual savings of $11.4 million. Savings Amount To 410 Million When all actions are completed there will be annual savings of $410 million and reduction of 53,010 personnel, without decreasing mili- tary effectiveness or limiting cur- rent and future activities in South- east Asia. Some 93,691 acres of land will also be released for non-Defense use. Secretary McNamara said the 22 overseas actions, including Puerto Rico, will not be announc- ed" until a later date, after gov- ernments of the countries con- cerned have been consulted. These actions are in Europe, the northern Pacific and the Western Hemishere, and will pro- duce annual savings of $81 mil- lion. No movement of combat mili- tary forces is involved. In order to minimize the impact on employees and communities, the secretary said actions announced will be phased over a period of several years. (AFNB) NavCommSta Officers Bid Keflavik Farewell Two officers from the Naval Communication Station, Ice- land, were "Blessed" at a party held at the Viking Vista. Cdr F. N. Colvin, executive officer of NavCommSta, will leave on Jan. 6 to assume du- ties as Executive Officer, Dis- ciplinary Command, Ports- mouth, N.H. Lt T. A. Galyon, NavComm- Sta admin and personnel offi- cer, will leave Dec. 16 and will report to DCA Southeastern Asia Mainland, Republic of Vietnam for duty. In This Issue Christmas Services .... pg. 2 Christmas Pageant .... pg. 3 Aunt Maizy's Recipe .. pg. 3 Sports ............... pg. 4 Cheerleaders .......... pg, 5 Entertainment ........ pg. 6

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