The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 30.12.1944, Blaðsíða 2

The White Falcon - 30.12.1944, Blaðsíða 2
This should settle the douhts of many GIs who have passed by the above building on Laugavegi, won- dering for what purpose it will ultimately be used. When completely finished, it will be -the new Seamen's School. As in many island coun- tries, the sea has always been an integral part of the lives of many Icelanders and has played an import- ant part in the development of the country. It is only natural then that the heri- tage should be cherished and furthered. One way of doing this has been by properly training those who wish to follow the calling. Iceland has long provided a fi*ee sailor training school where all seamen can get a basic foundation for their chosen field. Upon further study, they may enter the Merchant Fleet if they like, although Merchant Seamen's School. this is in no way. obligatory for admission to the school. The only requisite is that a candidate have three years of experience at sea before applying for Seamen's School. As most boys follow the sea when quite young, the average age of those starting to school is only about 20 years. Various certi- ficates are given graduates of the school. One may study for the highest degree (Master of Vessels in Inter- national (Waters) for three years or for an intermediate one (Master of Fishing Ves- sels) requiring a course of two years, five months. A four-months course is also given covering the rudiments of sailing-usually taken by elementary fishermen, pre- paratory to operating their own boats. If one takes the highest certificate and goes into the Merchant Fleet, they may, by ability and progressive senority in service, ascend to a Captaincy-skipper of a ship. After a minimum of four years at sea one may become a Mate, after three years as a Mate it is then possible to become a Cap- tain. The original school, found- ed in 1891, is always over- flowing. Classes have never been large enough for all those who apply. Consequ- ently in 1942 the present new building was begun. Due to wartime restrictions, it could not be completed until this year. Still not com- pletely outfitted inside, it will not actually open for classes until next Fall. In addition to the navigation and engineering schools, a wireless and steward school will be incorporated in the new building, thus giving complete training in the sinsle school. OOT NOTES y PvT. ET. Jack <rva.y A vote of thanks to the QM and to all unit cooks for their top-drawer Christmas dinner... Such efforts are recognized and appreciated, even if, in most cases, they do not ever hear of it...They meet such holidays with a commendable spirit, when to most of us they signify relaxation, but only more work to them. . .Another job along that line is that of GI telephone operators. . . For what must be at times, a tiresome task, they show an amazing amount of patience and fortitude. . .While to the user, the service is sometimes exasperating, it is usually no fault of the operators and their courtesy and tact in handling such calls sets an example for many to follow... I have never heard (or heard of) a single 'flip' retort. The Christmas spirit was evident in decorations in most camps here over the holiday week. . .An especially fine job was done by the workers of Red Cross Club 14 and ho doubt at all the other dubs, some of which I did not visit. . . Programs were well-rounded, ,too. . . For calling ,on Christmas Day, many Reykjavikers got out their top hats to pay their respects. . . With their attractively dres- sed wives in long-skirted native costumes, they made a picturesque vignette. * * * During the lush pre-Christmas mood that gripped New York, John D. Rockefeller, Jr. got out his usual 50-foot, snow-ball laden Christmas tree for his Center. . .Billy Rose opened his latest extravaganza, "Seven Lively Arts'.. . The premiere was something that has not been seen since the flamboyant Ziegfeld opening years ago. . . First- nighters paid $24 apiece for tickets... In white ties, they sipped champagne provided by the house. . .bravo-ed Beatrice Lille... howled at Bert Lahr... tapped feet to Benny Goodman's clarinet. . . But, when it was all over, decided that the fanfare was better than the show.. . Another opening, an auspicious one, was Fredric March in "A Bell for Adano". . .It is slated for the top. * * * The lot of some GIs stationed in the States is a tough one... At a recent preview of Spring fashions for women at the swank Hotel Pierre in New York, fifty GIs were nominated by their C. O. to attend.. .Just why, no one ever figured out.. .especially as not one of the host of fashion editors present, in typical civilian disregard, bothered to question the soldiers on their fashion prefer- ences after seeing the show. . . But it's nice work if you can get it. — Farsseltnydr, boys! BASIC TRAINING HAS GROWN TOUGHER. MORE REALISTIC-SAYS GROUND FORCES OFFICIAL Above, members- of the latest ENSA show to come to Iceland pose after a performance which brought catcalls and cries for "more" from the GIs at the Tripoli Theater this week. Reading 1 to r are Syd Brooks, pianist; Ann Begley, songstress; Mickey Ren ton, impersonator; Pearl Taylor, dancer; Peggy Marshall, song stylist; Iris Cribb, dancer; Ivy Barry, contortionist; and Dorothy Perkins, dancer. Kneeling at the table is Cliff Gay, comic and MC. Although the Army reach- ed its designated strength a short time ago, men are still being inducted at the rate of about 950,000 a year, Select- ive Service officials estim- ate. A large percentage — how large is an official secret — I is going into the Army, where a training program of considerable proportions still is in effect, for train- ing men as replacements. Of those who so into the Armv a big majority wind up in Infantry Replacement Cent- ers. In an effort to obtain an authoritative statement as to what kind of training is being given these new recru- its, many of them youngst- ers of 18, Camp Newspaper Service recently sent a man to interview Lt. Col. H.W. Dammer, Assistant G-3, Army Ground Forces, who served at one time with the famed Rangers in Italy and North Africa. Viewing the subject from the vantage point of experi- ence in both combat and training, Col. Dammer arri- ved at two main conclusions: 1. Basic is a lot more rug- ged, physically, than it was in the days before he went overseas in 1942. 2. It is also more "real- istic," and better geared to the practical necessities of the job at hand. "I get a feeling of high power from the present pro- gram that was absent in the early days," stated the col- (Continued on Page 3) THE WHITE FALCON is published weekly by and for the American Forces in Iceland, under supervision of Special Ser- vice Section, Iceland Base Command. Some material is supplied by Camp Newspaper Service, New York City, republication of which is prohibited without CNS approval. THE WHITE FALCON has been passed by the censor and may be mailed home for one-and-one-half • cents. IBC Special Service Officer . Lt. Col. Lee F. Gilstrap Supervising Officer ........Lt. David Zinkoff Editor ....................Sgt. John Moran Associate Editor ..........Sgt. J. Gordon Farrell News Editor ..............Cpl. Robert Hill Staff Reporter ............Pvt. E. C. Gray

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The White Falcon

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