The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 06.01.1945, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 06.01.1945, Blaðsíða 1
OUR FORCES —. ALWAYS ALERT I_________________ f is la:; >s Vol. VII. ICELAND, Saturday, January 6, 194-5. No. 16. Alaska Vet, Now In Iceland Compares GI Life In Two Outposts Mosquitoes "as big as hors- es" and temperatures as low as 72 degrees below zero are two of the features of bis stay in Alaska tbat IBC Sgt. Dale Klone would like most to forget. After having spent the winter of 1942 and '43 in Al- aska . with a QM. trucking outfit, "Sourdough" Klone was indeed a most-surpris- ed GI when he landed in Ice- land over a year ago. You could have blown him down Sgt. Dale Klone, above, reads the Kodiak Bear, GI publication in Alaska, with interest as he spent a year with the Army there before coming to Iceland. The White Falcon, incidentally, "out- ranks" the Kodiak Bear by three months—although both papers started publication in 1941. U.S. COLLEGES PREPARI HUGE POSTWAR ENROLMENT Discharged, soldiers, 10,000 of whom enrolled in Amer- ican colleges and universiti- es last fall, have set in mo- tion among U.S. educators what may be the most ex- tensive program of higher education ever instituted. A few schools which have already formulated definite plans for returning service- men are: Tufts College, which is of- fering refresher courses in certain key professions and industries. Chicago University, which is planning to admit veter- (Continued on Page 2) with a cold Kodiak wind, too, when he found that he was again assigned to a trucking company. Making his weekly 370 mile run from the supply port to his camp in the in- terior was as tough as a month of driving over tbe Icelandic roads, Klone main- tains. In both countries, how- ever, tbe. winds, changing climatic conditions, ice. and snow banks require that a driver be on his toes. Like Iceland, Alaska's cli- mate changes from one mountain valley to the next. Even with the warming trade winds blowing up from Japan, Dale reports; that Al- aska is much colder than Iceland. With outposts and camps scattered, for miles across the bleak, wind-swept tundra and snowed down in the val- leys, troops have to rely more on Mother Nature for their sports. Fishing and hunting are favorite pastimes with tbe men on our North Pacif- ic base. Bear, caribou and trout-fish are plentiful. As for the simple GI com- forts, huts and parkas are as necessary at the top of the Pacific as they are at the top of the Atlantic. The good old-fashioned space heater in his hut in Iceland, Sgt. Klone finds,has proved more dependable than the oil stove he used way over on the oth- er side of the world. When the temperature dropped, the fuel oil would thicken and have to be scraped from its container "like so much apple butter," he states. Sporting both Asiatic-Pac- ific and ETO service ribbons in addition to his five over- seas stripes, Sgt. Klone feels that it will take him some time to thaw .out when he returns to his home at York, Nebr., when the war is over. NEW WESTERN AT FIELDHOUSE SUNDAY Rated as one of the better westerns of 1944, TALL IN THE SADDLE comes gallop- ing onto the Fieldhouse screen tomorrow evening at 2000 hours with John Wayne and Ella Raines in the lead roles. BIRTHDAY CAKE Brig. Gen. Early E. W. Duncan, Commanding Ge- neral of the IBC, cuts into the 75-pound birthday cake pressnted to him by Donald B. Brandon, WO JG, on behalf of the Tri- poli Officers Club. The General's birthday (his 51st) fell on Monday, Jan. 1. The culinary master- piece which was created for him by Pfc. Clayton Kamm, Hq., IBC, was later distributed by the General to two U.S. Army hospi- tals here. Attending Gen. Duncan's birthday party were: the Prime Minister of Iceland, U.S. Army and Navy officials, and offici- als of the American, Sov- iet, French', Danish and British legations. Ford Motor Co, Will Grant Vets Top Job Priority A plan to grant veterans top priority on all available work has been announced by the Ford Motor Company. Under proposals submit- ted to the United Automobile Workers Union, Ford would also beperm.itt.ed to hirehon- orably discharged veterans "at any time — even when other employes of the com- pany are out of work." The company also an- nounced War Labor Board approval of $80,000 worth of vacation and bonus monej' to the 2,500 honorably dis- charged servicemen already re-employed at the plant. General Motors and Chrys- ler Corporations have also submitted proposals to the Union on preference rights for veterans. Selective Service Order Increases Quota To 80100 New Recruits H If Ail Men Previously Turned Down Special Kodachrome Show At Fieldhouse January 21 A special showing of nat- ural-color (kodachrome) slides will be presented at the Fieldhouse, 2000 hours, Jan. 21. All of the slides show pictures of Iceland and GI scenes here. They are the work of Tec 5 Luther Chov- an, Signal Corps, photo- grapher, and represent re- cent additions to the collec- tion of kodachrome slides which he presented at the Fieldhouse some four months ago. The slides will precede the "regular Sunday night movie. War Prisoners In U.S. Now Number 359,247 Office of the Provost Mars- hal General in Washington, D.C., has revealed that on Dec. 1, 1944, there were 359,247 prisoners of war held within the continental limits of the U.S. They included: 305,648 Germans, 51,156 Italians and 2,443 Japanese. Selective Service has been' ordered by the War Dept. to boost its January and Febru- ary draft calls from 60,000 to 80,000 men each month. At the same time, Selective Service announces that all men under 30 who have been rejected for military service since Feb. 1, 1944 -— except those with obvious physical defects — will be re-examin- ed as soon as possible: The War Dept. explains that this new increase in draft quotas is necessary be- cause the Array's policy of combing surplus men out of organizations no longer needed has now produced all the men that can be releas- ed at this time. Under this policy, the Army Air Forces have already transferred 55,000 men to the Ground Forces, while the Army Ser- vice Forces have turned over 25,000. Whether or not the 80,000 per month draft rate will continue after February will be determined later, the Ar- my reveals. "MARCH OF DIMES' RESPONSE SAID HIGHLY GRATIFYING' According to Lt. Col. Lee F. Gilstrap, Base Special Service Officer, the initial re- sponse of personnel in this Command to the "March of Dimes" campaign has been "most gratifying." Funds collected will be used to. com- bat infantile paralysis. Last year when the U.S. experienced the second worst epidemic of infantile paralysis in its history, many of those stricken were the wives, sons and daughters of American servicemen. In August a seaman on his wajT to join his ship was call- ed to Moline, I1L, where his 12-year-old daughter lay stricken with the disease. About the same time, anoth- er Navy man arrived home in Jacksonville on emergen- cy furlough, when both his wife and six-ryear-old son were added to the list of vic- tims. These cases had their counterparts all over the country. In the forefront of the bat- tle against this disease, for which doctors have as yet no cure, has been the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis. It is this organiza- tion which will receive the money now being contribut- ed to the "March of Dimes" campaign by Americans all over the world. NAZI NIT-WITS BUCKING FOR BUZZBOMB TICKETS According to a German an- nouncement relayed through Stockholm and reported by the United Press, "several hundred" incurable war in- valids of Naziland are buck- ing for a chance to take a one-way suicide trip to Lon- don in a German V-4 ¦— ap- parently a piloted variation of the flying bomb.

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The White Falcon

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