The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 06.01.1945, Blaðsíða 3

The White Falcon - 06.01.1945, Blaðsíða 3
STORY RELEASED ON GREENLAND RATTLE AGAINST GERMAN WEATHER EXPERTS Unlike the war as it is be- ing fought anywhere else in the world was a running bat- tle recently completed on the east coast of Greenland. - Probably fewer than 500 men, counting both sides, took part in the weird fray, yet it lasted from late April to October, 1944. And al- though the fighting was scar- cely 800 miles from the North Pole, its result may shortly be felt all along the western front in Germany;. The battle lost the Nazis a well-equipped mefcorclog- ical outpost with which, days in advance, they had been spotting weather trends for all Europe, and seeking to anticipate Allied strategy in light of changing weather conditions. High-powered- radio equipment enabled 60 German military and tech- nical experts in the far north to maintain direct contact with Berlin. Their communi- cation for the rest of the war will be by way of well-cen- sored mail from prisoner-of- war camps in the U.S. A party of the Greenland Sledge Patrol, made up of Danish nationals and Eski- mo; dogsled drivers came upon a well-fortified en- emy base last April — and in turn was surprised by a bearded German officer while spying on the position. The patrol leader killed the Nazi in a toe-to-toe pistol duel. Their shots aroused the encampment, but the sleds escaped under machine-gun fire, and in due time Coast Guard stations were apprisr ed of the enemy's presence. The Army entered the pic- ture in July, putting a com- bat group of 27 ashore at Cape Sussi, to march on the reported enemy position. A Coast Guard platoon of 26 approached from another direction and a landing par- ty of 15 from'still another. All converged on the objec- tive \ (so well camouflaged that it could be seen from only one angle), but the Naz- is had gone. A 155-foot trawl- er, some of their precious weather recording instru- ments and radio equipment had been smashed. That put a temporary halt to the matter until mid-Octo- ber when a patrol plane ob- server spotted an unusual "iceberg" off Cape Borgen. Twilight in Greenland "wat- ers causes icebergs to appear with one side bright while the other side is very dark. This one was in reverse: white where it should"have been dark, and vice versa. Swooping low, the plane re- cognized it as an outbound ship, drifting southward. Word was flashed to the Coast Guard cutters, East- wind and Southwind, patrol- ling some 50 miles away. At midnight, Oct. 16, the Coast Guard ships sighted a "dark blotch" where the plane had located their quar- ry. After bracketing the ob- ject with his main batteries, the Eastwind's commander, Capt. C. Wi Thomas of Long Beach, Calif., flashed a warn- ing: ;'I)o not scuttle the ship or we will fire!" The Nazis surrendered. An American boarding party was greeted by three German officers, including a sublieutenant, the. com- mander. The Holland-built trawler, named Extersteine was found to be 183 feet long, with a 30-foot beam, 15-foot draft and a register ed tonnage of 650. Every- thing was turned over to the Coast Guardsmen in good Order, the Germans them- selves removing mines in-J tended to sabotage engines and machinery. Armaments consisted of a 37 mm. gun mounted forward With twin 20 mm. guns astern. About midship on the starboard side was a mysterious mount which the Americans assum- ed to be a rocket projector. A picked Coast Guard crew of 28 men was placed aboard the FNIersieine fur the re- turn journey to Boston. Weather, 'Military Situation' Halt Shuttle Bombing Via Russia No consideration other than the weather and the military situation were in- volved in the suspension of shuttle bombing of Germany through the use of Russian bases, an USAAF spokesman said in Washington this week. The explanation was oc- casioned by an article of col- umnist Drew Pearson in which it was stated that shut- tle bombing had been stop- ped because of Russian re- fusal to continue to provide bases for the Yanks. The Air Force spokesman said tlfat our -planes have not been stopped from flying over Russia and Would continue to do so. EVOLUTION? In Pittsburgh, Pa., detec- tives are scratching their heads and wondering how a Persian cat can change into a hunting dog. The cat, Syl- via, was crated and shipped to New York recently, but when the crate was opened a hunting dog emerged. Combat GIs Still Able To Laugh At Life According to an item in the Army newspaper, Stars and Stripes, some of the signs posted along the roads in Holland these days, read: "Spend Your Holidays in the Nijmcgen Salient - Lux- ury Flats (Mud); Hot and Cold (Mostly Cold); Boat- ing and Swimming; Shoot- ing (Both Ways); Boche Hunting in the Woods." Inside the town is a large sign with the inscription: "Tours to Berlin Arranged for Large and Small Parl- ies." L.S.U. Coed Protests University's Handling Of 'Sex Problem' Pretty Gloria Jeanne'"Hel- ler of Havana, Cuba, was forced to resign from Louisi- ana State University after she led protests against Uni- versity President J. B. Hatch- er who had reprimanded co- eds for kissing their dates! at dormitory doors. Hatcher said he gave Miss Heller the choice of "resign- ing or. being dropped after she admited writing a leaf- let in which she discussed the university's altitude to- ward sex." Miss Heller said that all she was trying to do Was show that the university dealt with sex problems "in such a way as to over-emph- asize them. Students called a mass meeting in protest. Ikz JnquLALnfy Congress Passes Measure To Investigate Itself Believing that it's living in the "gaslight days," Congress" has completed action on a resolution to investigate it- self. Both Houses have pas- sed a measure setting up a 12 member Vice-Cui.iniitlee to study the possibility^ of streamlining procedure, re- organizing the committee system for more effective action and determining if its method of handling) legisla tion is archaic. U.S. Forces Raining Huge Stock Of Shells At Enemy In a little more than three months, three American armies in France fired 300,000,000 rounds of small arms ammuniton; 4,426,000 rounds of 105 mm. ammuni- tion; 1,248,000 rounds of 155 mm. shells and 3,5OO\000 rounds of mortar shells. These figures were releas- ed by Lt. Gen. Brehon B. Somervell, commanding general of the Army Service Forces, in an address in New York before the National As- sociation of Manufacturers, in which he urged greater production to save Americ- an lives. HA MA WORKS GOOD ON PAPER-HUH F£LLAS? What will be one of the first things you'll do after you return home? ". .#. . after that, I'm going to have my wife broil me one of'lhe big- gest steaks you ever saw!" re- plied Pvt. J. Gumina of New ; Bruns- wick, N.J. "___then I think we might throw a little party for all our friends — for I'd sort of like to see a lot of the gang again and have a few drinks. Did I say a few . . :. what am I saying!" Pfc. Louis G. Amrich, an- swered, "I just want to take a good long rest and enjoy s o m e goo d home cooking for a change. Later, I'd like to see some really good shows." Louis is a native of Melrose Park, 111., and was a construction foreman pri- or to ..the war. "Well, the first thing I'll do is my busi- ness!" was Tec 5 S. F. Eller- mah's swiftrc- tort. "The sec- ond week, Fin going to spend soaking up some of that good California sunshine — yeah, between showers!" A Californian, of San Diego, Ellerman was a surveyor before joining the Army. LAC P. Fisherman of Tor- onto, Canada, said, "I'm just going to spend the first few weeks quietly with my fam- ily and friends. I wan I to re- lax and not think of anything military for awhile. Will that lime ever come?" Fisherman was a salesman in civilian life.' WAR DEPT. FORESEES POSTWAR LAND B0$M So many soldiers and war workers are said, to be putt- ing (heir savings into down paymenls on farms Unit (lie Dcpt. of Agriculture is meas- uring the possibility of a' largescale land boom — while urging careful judg- ment in purchasing. The De- partment declares that more people are' now buying farms, all- over Ihe U.S., than ever before.

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The White Falcon

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