The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 13.01.1945, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 13.01.1945, Blaðsíða 1
OUR FORCES — ALWAYS ALERT Vol. VII. ICELAND, Saturday, January 13, 19k5. No. 17. Falcon Editorial Comment To Be Strictly Gl During the two month period (October to December, 19H) wh we found ourselves so limited in space that certain of our regular w column. However, now that it's no longer necessary for us to squeeze ou editorials '¦— but with this change: they will be written not by us bul What editorials appear in future editions of this paper will th tudes expressed by us, but will be your oivn opinions expressed by ijo\ you may have the opportunity, first-hand, of saying what you think — long as we receive worthwhile response. Your "guest editorial" may be cis long or as short as you like a est to readers. Only limiting factors are military security and excessib' improved ways of doing things where a situation involves a number will be ruled out. Since all "guest editorials" must — like our other copy. — be ap necessary for us to alter your material. But we promise you that thi This is not a contest, and unless response is exceptionally hea be sure to include your name and unit. The first of these editorials w each week thereafter. Eligible to participate are all Allied servicem Send your "guest editorial" to: EDITOR, THE WHITE FALC en circumstances forced us to print the Falcon in its "abbreviated" form, eekly features had to be deleted. One such feature was our editorial I r copy, photos and cartoons into six small pages, we) plan to resume] the, t by you, the Falcon readers — the GIs in Iceland. eref.ore represent no second-hand impressions of your ideas and atli- urselves. We decline the prerogative of speaking^ in your behalf so that on any subject under the sun and the opportunity will exist for as: nd may be concerned with amj topic which yon think might be of inter- e or groundless "griping." Don't misunderstnd us — you may suggest of men, but individual complaints concerning individual difficulties. proved by Army censors prior to publication, it may sometimes be s won't be done unless it IS necessary. vy we shall publish every "guest editorial" we "receive. Incidentally, ill apear in our issue of Saturday, Jan. 20, and the: feature will continue en in Iceland. There is no deadline. ON, BASE SPECIAL SERVICE. War Dept. Says 5,000.000 Vets Will Go Back To College After making a survey of GIs overseas and in the U. S., the War Dept. lias dis- covered that 500,000 of the 6,750,000 enlisted men now in the Army definitely plan to return to fulltime college or other studies as soon as the war in over. About 1,200,- 000 soldiers state they are thinking of attending some part-time school or college. FROM WHOM? The Army plans to purc- hase 3,850,000,000 packs of cigarettes during 1945. 'The Sweaters Are Tighter' Detroit Men, Back Speak Of Typica In American From T.D., Changes Scene Upon returning to Detroit after more than a year with an Air Corps unit in Iceland, Cpl. Harold R. Nemecheck and! Cpl. Russell Wells were very much aware of the changes that had taken place in the city during their ab- sence. For example, more hous- ing projects and shacks have popped up on the edges of town as Americans have Prominent Icelandic Baritone To Give Concert With Army Band Opening the first concert of its 1945 season at the And- rews Fieldhouse tomorrow evening at 2030 hours, the Army Band presents as solo- ist Mr. GuSmundur Jonsson, prominent Icelandic bari- tone, who has just complet- >$$&*$&$&&% For other first-hand im- pressions of life in the U.S.. see page 3. flocked to the Motor City — mecca of big wages and good war jobs. Cpl. Wells found that more colored people bad migrated to the city from the South. Women dressed in slacks antf carrying lunch pails are a common sight in Detroit and every other metropolis these days. Although both the men are married, the "wolf" in Nemecheck and Wells couldn't help but not- ice that the sweaters are tighter and the skirts short- er. Nemecheck was astound- ed nine months' voice study in Hollywood, Calif. Back in Iceland for a ser- ies of recitals, Mr. Jonsson ed at lhe llumber of women will make his d,ebut singing Mr. GuSmundur Jonsson before the Armed Forces. Among other selections, he has chosen "Song of Songs" and the "Song of the Volga Boatman." The Army Band, under the direction of CWO John D. Corley, will feature the music from "Oklahoma!" — smash, Broadway hit which is still drawing throngs to the box office window even after a two-year run. "Sailor In Town," a rhap- sody for piano and band, will be repeated. lis compos- er, Cpl. Millard S. Thomson, will appear at the piano. Each man in uniform may bring a guest. No tickets are necessary. . wearing toeless shoes - even in the snow. Street car and bus trans- portation is free to all mem- bers of the armed forces who visit Detroit. The USOs offer tickets for the best theaters and for outstanding sport- ing events. There were more Christmas invitations from civilians than there were GIs Kodachrome Exhibit At Fieldhouse Jan. 21 Tec 5 Luther Chovan will present his newest set of natural color (kodachrome) slides at the Andrew Field- house on Sunday, Jan. 21, at 2000 hours. These slides show Icelandic scenes and also views of GI life here. to accept them, Wells re- marked. As for the cigarette short- age, both Harold and Russ admit that it's acute, but that in their home city, at least, every effort is put forth, to see that men in uni- form get enough to smoke. The restaurants and night ETO PAPER PICKS 'Gl JOE' AS ITS MAN OF THE YEAR In a year's end campaign conducted by Stars and Stripes, . American service daily in the ETO, to deter- mine the "man of the year,"1 lop choice has been ann- ounced as "GI Joe." The newspaper states: "The very first nominating letter that came in plugged for GI Joe — for all the frontline GI Joes, from those clubs have a fair selection who jump behind the enemy of food on their menus, but lines to the medics who the service, is slow. The liq-' crawl into the lines to succor, uor-making holiday granted the wounded. And in the distillers last summer has flood of letters that fol^v- eased the drinking situation ed, GI Joe's name led all the somewhat. "By the way,", rest - from President Roose- said Wells, "I found that my, velt and General Eisenhow- overseas service stripes were er to Sad Sack and old John good for more than one Q. Public —¦¦ by at least 10 (Continued on Page 2) ' to 1." — i. ¦ . i —¦¦¦¦ii . —¦¦.......—...... ¦ ¦ ¦ ¦!¦¦—- i | m± Union Leader Suggests That Employers Pay War Bonus To Discharged Veterans A proposal that employ- ers pay a "war service bon- us" to discharged war vet- erans has been made by R. J. Thomas, president of the United Automobile Work- ers (CIO). Thomas advo- cates a bonus equal to 20 percent of a veteran's start- ing wage — to be paid for a period equal to the veter- an's length of service. Asserting that part of the bonus would come from funds which otherwise would go'to lhe government in taxes, the union leader said that American industry, "which in every sense has profiled during the war,"- could well afford to make the contribution as partial repayment for the veterans* services to their country. Gen. Bonesteel Replaced By Gen. Pratt In W.D.C. New Commanding Gener- al of the Western Defense Command has been an- nounced as Maj. Gen. Harry Conger Pratt. He succeeds Maj. Gen. Charles II. Bone- steel, former Commanding General of the IBC.

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