The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 03.03.1945, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 03.03.1945, Blaðsíða 1
OUR FORCES — ALWAYS ALERT Vol. VII. ICELAND, Saturday, March 3, 1945. No. 2't, rtrsi .BdtBlntfJlu! Declaring iliat the Ger- mans might fight on with small arms (after their war plants are lost) until the western Allies and the Russi- ans join forces, Supreme Commander Gen. Eisenhow- er last week said that the newAllied offensive waspro- gressing satisfactorily. "I ex- pect to destroy every Ger- man west of the Rhine and in the area in which we arc attacking," he added Making clear that he had no hope of imminent Ger- man collapse, Eisenhower staled that it is not believed that American casualties will be as high as they were last fall. There has always been complete liaison be- tween the Russian and Alli- ed armies, the Gen. added. As for the German count- er-offensive in December, the Supreme. Commander remarked jocularly that he was not frightened by the attack until two or three weeks later when he read a newspaper from the U.S. (Sig.-Corps Photo). Tec 5 Michael W. Greco prepares to air another "broad- cast" over his sirictly Gl "radio station." SIGNAL CORPS 111 GONSTIUCT m Tim. Wlis TO i PCblClE I visa M ceiati tor western - til n W Si* - If Putting their Army train- ing to a little extra-curricul- ar use, men in a Signal Corps unit here recently complet- ed installation of a camp- wide wire "radio service" which carries music and radio programs to every mess hall, day room and hut. Bujlt under the supervis- ion of Tec 5 Michael W. Greco of Youngstown, Ohio, the "radio station" has a control panel with two turn- tables and faders which all- • A • Help A8By* Locate Los An American plane made a forced landing near Borgarnes Wednes- day, a week ago, with little damage to the plane and virtually no injury to its pil- ot — but the incident prov- ided one more of many ex- amples of the splendid coo- peration given by local Ice- landic authorities to the military, IBC officials said today. The last signal heard from the plane was just after 1100 hours. The plane had been 'unable to land locally and when last heard from bad uthorities ilitaryT© been near Borgarnes. An Army officer in Reykjavik (Continued on Page 3) II" ow for smooth transitions from one recording to anoth- er. A special radio brings in the news from the Armed Forces Radio Station — whose other programs also are heard over the camp sy- stem. • Cpl. Greco airs these pro- grams as a sideline, being busy during the day driving a truck. His station is on the air from 0745 to 0830, 11()0J to 1200 and 1300 to 2400 hours daily. In addition to rebroad- casting the AFRS programs, Greco also plays recordings for the men injiis outfit. The most frequently requested number at the present time is."I'll Be Seeing You" which Jo Stafford vocalizes. New- ly-appointed Pfcs. are often surprised to hear a special song dedicated to them: "Old Soldiers Never Die." "Carelessness, Rack 9! Discipline Among QUARTER MILLION MEN MONTHLY WILL GET DISCHARGES—WHEN GERMANY'S DEFEATED The War Dept. this week announced that it plans to release between 200,000 and 250,000 men monthly after the European war ends. Brig. Gen. Frank T. Hines, Veter- ans' Administrator, has ask- ed Congress to pass a bill for $246,775,000 to be used by the Veterans' Administr- ation. Over half of the men to be discharged will be those with disabilities. . Hines said the present rate of discharges is runn- ing around 90,000 monthly, adding that- approximately 700,000 out of 1,600,000 men released up to last Novem- ber were given certificates of disability discharge. From Iceland lo France and back to Iceland again was the joiTit experience of four GIs who returned here recr- enlly on seven-day furloughs direct from the battle-, fronts along the Siegfried Line. Tney ali agreed that Iceland looked "pretty good." One of the men, Sgt. Paul Bene of Cleveland, Ohio, formerly with an Infantry outfit here, wears a Purple Heart which was presented him for a shrapnel wound he suffered in his left arm during fighting near Fort Driant, France. The engagements in this area, said Bene, who has fought against the Germans all the way from Normandy to Mclz, were the "most rugged" he has known. "Up at the front we live in foxholes." he said. "And what I mean we really live in them. Every time we move into a new area the first Ihihg we do is In start dig- ing — a'ld in lliis kind of weather that's pretty tough sometimes. Even when the surface of the ground is soft, the earth underneath is oft- en frozen tight as hell. But the security of a foxhole has saved my life mors than once." Asked if he had killed any Germans, Sgt. Bene said he had—"But don't ask me how many!" he said, explaining that the circumstances of the moment often make it a trifle inconvenient to stop and count corpses. lie related how lie captur- ed a lone German on a bicy- cle one day. "I saw this guy coming towards me up a country road and at first I didn't know whether he was (Continued on Page 3) Captured German CO Documents taken from a group of 80 German officers aiid men who were captur- ed two weeks ago by British troops in the Canadian 1st Army reveal evidences of a breakdown in German military discipline. One order by the com- mander of a German para- troop outfit said: "In the past iVw weeks there has been an intoler- able slovenliness, careless- ness and lack of discipline among all ranks. Any ex- cuse is good enough for not carrying out an order. Wea- pons are not maintained ... . Much, equipment is Josl. From now on, very severe action will be lakoji.'* Peace Plan Offered By Paris Stripper "A plan for lasting peace," which strikes at the pro- blem from a refreshingly new and different angle, was offerred to the world's statesmen recently by a Miss Gizfey, Varga, striptease artist, currently showing her wares in Paris. . ! The plan proposed by Miss Varga calls for an internat- ional "undressing carnival"—a sort of G-string Olympics which would be thrown open to female participants from all the Allied nations. "What better way can people learn about each other," suggests Miss Varga, "than by strip—I mean, than by; observing the arts of the various countries?"

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The White Falcon

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