The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 17.03.1945, Blaðsíða 4

The White Falcon - 17.03.1945, Blaðsíða 4
'4 THE WHITE FALCON is published -weekly by and for the American Forces in Iceland, under supervision of Special Ser- vice Section, Iceland Base Command. Some material is supplied by Camp Newspaper Service, New York City, republication of which is prohibited without CNS approval. THE WHITE FALCON has been passed by the censor and may be mailed home for one-and-one-half cents. IBC Special Service Officer .Maj.. Sidney E. Cockrell Jr. Supervising Officer ........Lt. David Zinkoff Editor ....................Sgt. John Moran Associate Editor ..........Sgt. J. Gordon Farrell News Editor ..............Sgt. Robert Hill Staff Reporter ............Pvt. E. C. Gray Circulation ................S/Sgt. Rosario Tessier MANY GIS ARE MAKING DOWN PAYMENTS ON FARMS — ARE YOU INT- ERESTED IN GOING INTO FARMING AFTER THE WAR? "No!! Being an easterner I'll let the western boys take< care of our farming situation!" is the way that Pfc. Alfred J. White ' an- swers this question. An MP here,* White was a student at Villanova. His home is in Andover, Mass. Although he wouldn't com niit himself on his own per- sonal plans, Cpl. J. Rowl- inson of the RAF had some interest- ing views. He says: "In England, think it is a very thing for people -and especi- ally servicemen — to make •down payments on such a thing as a farm Nevertheless, farming strikes me as being a healthy and profitable bus- I don't regular One Year Old One-year-old Victoria El- izabeth James will have to go a long way yet before she has the lung-power of her father, famed trumpet player Harry James, as the above photo will testify. Young Vickie huffed and puffed but could- n't blow out the flame on the birthday candle. Her mother (as if you didn't know) is Betty Grable. iness and I feel sure that there are many who would like a chance to start." ""Mustang basketball play- er, Pfc. Jos- eph J. Leyden of the MPs, says that he's "definitely not" interest- ed in farming. "I'm strictly a city boy (Philadelphia, Pa.) at heart and being a plough jockey is not one of my am- bitions." Joe was a student before he joined Uncle Sam's MPs. Still another MP student, Cpl. 0. F. Medlin, says: "I have work- ed both at farming and city jobs and I think I pref- er the latter. My reason is that the income from the farm is too uncer- tain. I think I will search for some other occupation." Medlin hails from La Cent- er, Ky. REVIEWS OF NEW MOVIES ON NISSEN HUT CIRCUIT T.lie following reviews are of new films recently placed on disiri- bution here. Further reviews will appear from time to time as additional movies arrive. GRISSELY'S MILLIONS (Republic film starring Virginia Gray and Paul Kelly) A rich millionaire is on the verge of death, his re- latives are sweating his de- parture to greener pastures in order to realize the proc- eeds from his will and — oh; well, you know the rest. If you have nothing else to do, you might take it in. A TREE GROWS IN BROOK LYN (20th Cen.-Fox film with James . Dunn, Peggy Ann Gardner, Dorothy McGuire and Joan Blondell) Here's Betty Smith's nov- el done just the way it should be with Francie, Johnnie Nolan, Kate. Nolan, Aunt Sissy and all the others. It's every bit as true to life and1 :¦':'¦¦' ¦¦'';¦ Dorothy McGuire, as Katie Nolan, in a TREE GROWS as human as the book. Too IN BROOKLYN—one of the much can't be said in favor of this film. Every CO should make each man in the outfit see this tale of life in Brooklyn at the early part of the century. James Dunn turns in a performance that'll put him back at the top. Youthful Peggy Ann Gardner shows surprising emotion and understanding i as young Francie. Joan Another World War Would Be All Over In "A Few Hours," Says Bomb Expert The terrifying prediction of an inevitable World War III—of such intensity that it will last only a few hours— has been mp.de by the nation's foremost bomb-control expert, John Hays Hammond, Jr., who is currently en- gaged in secret work for the AAF. > Other Hammond forecasts were that every European capital will be in constant danger of obliteration within a few hours from highly developed rocket bombs which will be radio-controlled and perfected to such a high degree of accuracy as to constitute a super-artillery; and that many new automatic devices unknown in the pre- sent war will be used with devastating effect. Hammond, the holder of 800 patents, says: "We must be ready the next time. Some sort 6f system—either of accredited government representatives or spies—must be established to keep the U.S. posted on European tech- nical progress." new films on the IBC circuit. Blondell plays Aunt Sissy, the not too-moral aunt, to perfection. Only regretable thing is that such delightful characters from the novel as Gussie and Willie Flii'man and his horse IkxL to out bv the Hays OfiL WOMAN IN THE WINDOW (RKO film starring Ed- ward G. Robinson and Joan Bennett) You'll come out of this murder pysehological-myst- ery in a cold sweat if you possess the normal human reactions. Robinson, Benn- ett and Raymond Massey make this tale of a college professor one you can't aff- ord to miss. ENTER, ARSENE LUPIN (Universal film starring Charles Korvin and Ella Raines) Going whole hog, tin's story contains that familiar combination of a continent- al express roaring through the black of night, a myst- erious woman, a jewel thief and, of course, the inevitable jewels. This one'll be of int- erest just to see how this combination is handled. LAKE PLACID SERENADE (Republic film with Vera Hruba Ralston and William Frawley) Music, beautiful women and winter sports — a com- i^rj binaf ion which GIs in Ice- '¦pTid should appreciate. Ray GREAT MIKE (PRC film with Robert Henry and Stuart Erwin) This is the story of a boy, his race horse and his dog. It's a good, heart-warming type of film. CAN'T HELP SINGING (Universal film starring Deanna Durbin and Robert Paige) Even with Deanna Durb- in in technicolor and a Jer- ome Kern score, something went wrong oh this film which turns out to be the most disappointing Durbin effort to 'date. The color is beautiful, the costumes are magnificent and Deanna is o'or«eous. Ncble and his orchestra make this one passable. MURDER, MY SWEET (RKO film with Dick Pow- ell, Clair Trevor and Ann Shirley) < In book form this film was known as "Farewell, My Lovely." Somewhere along the line between the book and the final product, som-' elhing was lost. The story lacks continuity and Jluidn- ess. It jerks along, fh other words. However. Dick Pow- ell surprises with his ex- cellent acting. Clair Trevor is at her sexiest and Ann Shirley is her sweet, innoc- ent-looking self. Tiie cast makes this picture better than it would be otherwise. ATC Planes Averaged One Flight Per Hoar In '44 Planes of the ATC's North Atlantic Div. made an av- erage of one flight per hour during 1944, it was revealed this week. « An ANS dispatch states that 10,000 trans-Atlantic trips, not counting the flights of the Ferrying Division (which took thousands of combat and tactical planes across the ocean to the com- bat zones), were made carr- ying 53,000,000 pounds of cargo. In addition, 220,000 passengers and 23,000,000 pounds of mail made the journey. 'He never saved a niche! till he found out that officers aren't entitled to use tfie Soldiers Deposits system."

x

The White Falcon

Beinir tenglar

Ef þú vilt tengja á þennan titil, vinsamlegast notaðu þessa tengla:

Tengja á þennan titil: The White Falcon
https://timarit.is/publication/382

Tengja á þetta tölublað:

Tengja á þessa síðu:

Tengja á þessa grein:

Vinsamlegast ekki tengja beint á myndir eða PDF skjöl á Tímarit.is þar sem slíkar slóðir geta breyst án fyrirvara. Notið slóðirnar hér fyrir ofan til að tengja á vefinn.