The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 17.03.1945, Blaðsíða 5

The White Falcon - 17.03.1945, Blaðsíða 5
.> S«C»ftCOCJiOOOCOOGOCO«iO?«CGOCSOOOtK>OOttOCWC»OOttOCCttOOO!JO«OGttCSX5COttGO?}COOttOe<JC5 -THE AMERICAN SCENE- San Francisco Has Growing Pains San Francisco is a city which is said to be about ready to bulge at its sides because of the large wartime popu- lation increase. The density of population in the busy war-time port has risen from 14,227 per sq. mile in 1940 to 17,636 per sq. mile in 1945. Because of the Bay City's growing pains, the housing problem has created the most difficulty. Very often servicemen have had to sleep in hotel lobbies, bus stations and waiting rooms. Hotels have tried to help remedy the situation by turning every available nook and cranny into sleeping space. Many hotels use their halls, balconies and dining rooms for sleeping quarters. Street cars, cable cars and busses are overcrowded at rush hours. Late comers often hang onto back fenders or stand precariously on the steps. Saturday night on Market Street looks like New Year's Eve. Jap General Gets $126.50 Monthly—Pfc. Paid $2.07 "Honorable Warriors" of the Land of the Rising Sun earn the following monthly pay, according to their rank: General — .$12(5.50; Colonel — $71.30 to -$85.10; Major — 839.10 to $50.60; Captain — $27.60 to $35.65; First Lieut- enant — .$19.55 to $21.66. Sergeant — $5.29 to $6.90; Pfc. — -$2.07. MOST GIs EXPECT TO STAY PUT AFTER WAR When the war is over, ab- out eight out of ten enlisted men expect to return to the same state in which they liv- ed before being inducted, says the Army Information and Education Division aft- er conducting a recent sur- vey among GIs. Of the men who say they plan to move when the war is over, the greatest number apparently will migrate to 'he Far West or from the South to the Northeast. According to the survey, he Pacific Coast can expect m increase of about a quart- v of a million vets, the Vorthwest will show a slight ncrease in its ex-serviceman population, the Mountain States Avill neither gain nor lose any, and the South and West North Central sections of the country will show a decrease in their GI populat- ions. ARC Helps Feed PWs During 1944, the Ameri- can Red Cross shipped more than 12,000,000 food lackages to United Nations prisoners-of-war. TIE lUMiTiC SWOOriATRA AGAIN REJECTED LOS ANGELES: A well- dressed young man walked into a local hank recently, fook off his coat, walked be- hind the pay window and helped himself to $10,000. After lie had left with the money bank officials dis- covered he was not the audi- tor they were expecting but a complete stranger. PHILADELPHIA: A local resident has run the follow- ing ad in one of the city newspapers: "I xvill teach anyone to blow smoke rings for $10." NEW YORK: A 14-year- old nature lover was arre- sted the other day for stealing six birds from the Xeut Yor<k zoo. "They looked sick," he explain- ed, "and I just wanted to feed them, some mice." Crooner Frank Sinatra, classified 4-F more than a year ago, is shown above reporting to his local draft board in Jersey City, N.J., last month for examination to determine whether he should "be put into military service. The 26- year-t>ld crooner's wife and two children live in Has- brouck Heights, N.J. Turned «down again by the draft board, Sinatra is making plans for an overseas USO tour. S. CAROLINA VOTES DOWN DIVORCE BILL TENN SENATOR WANTS LAW AGAINST LIPSTICK, OCS REJECT DECLINES AWARD OF BRONZE STAR Six votes enabled South Carolina to remain as the only" state in the Union which does not permit divorce. A proposal to legalize divorce won a 70—43 major- ity last week in the House but failed to obtain the- two-thirds needed for constitutional amendment. With Bible in hand Representative Charles Huggins of Williamsburg led fight against bill, asserting it would "let down bars to wholesale sin." At the sr.me time Senator Hubert Brooks intro- duced a bill in the Tennessee legislature to make the use m cosmetics a felony because divorces are flou- rishing "because of lipstick evils." Brooks claimed that men of Tennessee are being con- | demned by wives whenever they come home with lipstick on collars and shirts. __• The senator admitted that the bill was no sillier than others and indicated it would never be brought J to vote. In deference to the boys overseas the Senate Judiciary Committee has rejected proposed constitutional amend- ments as long as the war lasts. The decision blocks Senate consideration of pend- ing proposal to give the House a voice in treaty rati- fication. Chairman McCarran (D.-Nev.) was quoted by Asso- ciated Press as saying no formal vote was taken but '"it was consensus of committee at closed session that no' constitutional issue be submitted to the States by Congress until the boys come home." Until he received a medical "detonation," S2/c Dewey Dupre lived for 47 days as a human bomb. In San Francisco, Cat, a successful operation was per- ; formed at a Naval Receiving hospital to remove fused 20mm. projectile from Dupre's body. Chief danger of the operation was that the sensi- tive projectile might explode on contact with operat- ing instruments, but after a consulation with bomb disposal experts, Cmdr. J. J. Hall, USNR, operated successfully. Because he was washed out of Infantry OCS in 1943, Sgt. Joseph Kusaila has refused the Bronze Star- for "exemplary courage and leadership" in action. Kusaila, now recuperating in Louisville, Kv., from an arm wound received in Germany last November, sent a 2500-word letter to General Marshall in which he said that the OCS board decided he lacke,d qualifications of a leader and thus he viewed Bronze Star award as '-ill— conceived to my conscience." Kusaila claimed he was washed out of OCS be- cause he criticized Fort Benning methods of estimat- ing candidates' intelligence. He is a graduate of Col- umbia University. Two hundred and seventy-five officers and men who were liberated from the Japanese prison camp at Caban:> Tuan, Luzon, arrived home last week in California to San Francisco's noisiest welcome of the war. The troop transport was escorted to anchorage by" dozens of harbor craft with whistles tied dowmr fireboats with streams playing, and blimps and bombers overhead. Some o fthc veterans cried openly. Sgt. William Thoni s of Bloomsburg, Pa., spoke for all when he said: "TJhas makes it all worthwhile." President Roosevelt sent each man a persona! letter expressing "thanks of a grateful nation for: your services" and the wish that "God grant each- of you happiness and an early return to health." Chosen from among thousands of conscientious objectors who volunteered their services, 36 men are being slowly starved at the University of Minnesota to test effect oF "starvation" diets now common in Europe. Later they will try suggested "rehabilitation" diets. Information obtained during the experiment will be used in rehabilitation programs in war-torn countcies.

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The White Falcon

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