The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 20.05.1961, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 20.05.1961, Blaðsíða 1
ftP ho- J=/LF 4 Buy Ydur Share Df America! Buy BdndsTdday Ydur Investment Is Safest In Savings Bdnds Volume XI, Number 18 Headquarters, Air Forces leeland, Keflavik Airport, Iceland—A MATS Unit Saturday, May 20, 1961 Pacing bomt 4^k oped A new temperature-resistant organic fiber looks promising for use in tires for the B-70 Valkyrie bomber and other aircraft. Devel- oped by the Air Force Systems mmand, this fiber could be us- lso in decelerator parachutes space capsules, personnel parachutes and packs, and in military clothing. Designated HT-1, the new fiber extends the useful range of or- ganic fibrous materials to 550 de- grees Fahrenheit. It can be used in any Air Force application where this high temperature is expected. It looks like nylon, but simply won't melt, fuse or burn, scient- ists say about tests that have been conducted since 1958. The Air Force and the Army have extended until Dec. 1963 in- dividual and crew training of U. S. and Allied Air Force stud- ents on the Jupiter intermediate- range ballistic missile by the Army Ordnance Guided Missile School at Redstone Arsenal, Ala. Originally an Army missile, the Jupiter was assigned to the opera- tional control of USAF in 1958. The extension was made to avoid "duplication of costly equip- vment and specialized technical in- ' structions," the Department of Defense announced. To date, some 1,600 U. S. and Allied students have received in- dividual training on the Jupiter. By 1963, the total will have risen _to about 2,600 technicians trained Jm all aspects of the operation *and maintenance of the Jupiter |sile system. * * * The familar signature at the bottom of Hq. USAF documents, "J. L. Tarr, Colonel, Director of Administrative Services," is no more. Colonel Tarr retired from active duty recently and has been re- placed by Col. Robert J. Pugh. ^Jlvreux Air Base helped its j/^Bnch hosts by rushing wreck- er!, ambulances and medical teams to the city of Evreux when a tornado struck there May 5. The storm ripped away roof | tops, moved cars and uprooted trees in a wide area. The base it- was not hit. * * * America's Transit satellite, which gives an accurate naviga- tional fix to a quarter mile in any kind of weather, requires $4,000 in radio receiving equip- ment to take advantage of this system. ADMIRAL DENNISON VISITS KA Admiral Robert L. Dennison, commander of defense forces of NATO in the Atlantic Ocean area, is welcomed aboard by IDF Commander Col. Benjamin 6. Willis after his arrival here. Others on hand to greet the admiral were the Honorable Garrett H. Soulen, charge d'affaires, U.S. Embassy, and Mr. Hoifdur Helgason, Icelandic chair- man of the U.S.-Icelandic Defense Council. Admiral Dennison was an honored guest of the Icelandic government during his visit. Standardized Call Signs Under Study By Inspector The Security and Law enforce- ment division at MATS head- quarters has recommended that standard police call signs and signals be adopted at all Air Force bases. This unified list of code signals will tend to reduce the possibility of errors and misunderstandings caused by the use of former sys- tems. According to the security of- ficials, a list of 50 short trans- missions covering normal Air Police and security work was sent to the Air Force Inspector Gene- ral for approval and possible adoption. The 50 standard calls normally used in connection with "Signal 10" codes, such as 10-1 for rob- bery, etc; were include in the package recommendation sent to USAF headquarters. When approved by the Air Force's law enforcement and se- curity chief, the standardized Air Police calls and signals will be used by all MATS Air Police un- its, beginning July 1, 1961, MATS officials added. When questioned as to how this procedure would affect Keflavik's Air Police unit, Air Police Super- intendent MSgt. Forrest L. Miller said that due to the large turnover of personnel, it would greatly aid department efficiency and would also help speed up operations. Sergeant Miller said, "It takes from two to three months for new assignees to learn the code and signals of each base he is sent to. But even then they are apt to forget and revert to the previous codes and signals learned from the last base where they were stationed. This could happen in an emergency and would of course upset the entire procedure. A standardized system of police radio call signs and signals would indeed be more than wel- come here." Inaugural Speech Excerpts Slated For AFD Program Excerpts from President Ken- nedy's inaugural address will highlight the special Armed Forc- es Day program to be broadcast by Armed' Forces Radio today at 7 p.m. • The half-hour program dramatically demonstrates how United States service personnel can translate the President's words into effective action. Three true episodes are present- ed to show how three different U. S. servicemen combined the qualities of courage, intelligence and good will and put the results to work for the good of our coun- try. The first episode, exemplifying courage, is from the Korean con- flict of 1950; the second goes back more than 120 years to a young U. S. midshipsman who exercised initiative and intelligence to make the seas safer for navigation; and the final episode, set in Ger- many during the months immedia- tely following World War II, shows how good will can be a vital part of our foundation for peace. Airman Selective Re-Up Program Makes Progress; KA Has Filled Its Quota First reports indicate that the first term airmen re- enlistment cycle for the second half of FY 1962 is pro- gressing so well that some quotas already have been met. This means that in some skill ^~ areas the opportunity to reenlist is limited to retraining. Several major commands al- ready have asked Hq. USAF for additional reenlistment quotas in certain career fields, USAF per- sonnel officials said. While described as a "desirable sittuation," Pentagon personnel officials point out that requests for additional quotas cannot be honored at this time. Any quota adjustment can come only after Hq. USAF have received and eva- luated first term airmen reenlist- ment reports from all commands. "Procedure for requesting add- tional quotas will be announced at a later date," Hq. USAF told Space-Age Scorebox Washington (AFPS) — With America's first sub-orbital flight termed a "success" by NASA, the space box score now reads: Satellites and probes to date: U.S. 40, Russia 15. Still in earth orbit: U.S. 21, Russia 1. In suit orbit: U.S. 2. Russia 2. Still transmitting: U.S. 9, Russia none. Hit the moon: U.S. none, Russia 1. Men launched into orbit: U.S. none, Russia 1. Space flight controlled by pilot: U.S. 1, Russia none. all commands. However, according to Airmen Personnel, Keflavik has filled its quotas and has received every quota requested from MATS. Qualified airmen who want to reenlist but are now being held up by the quota should under- stand that final decision on aut- hority to reenlist depends on an adjustment of the Air Force- wide quota. The reenlistment selection pro- cess is going on now and will con- tinue through May. Thus, final determination for reenlistment chances cannot be made immedia- tely. Though first term airmen earl- ier this year were given the op- portunity to wait until the eighth month before DEROS before mak- ing their career choices, they were warned by Hq. USAF that wait- ing could result in the authorized quota being filled.'In certain car- eer fields, this is exactly what happened. Personnel officials the past few months have been laying heavy stress on first-term reenlistments. They have increased attractive- ness of an Air Force career by developing an airman promotional distribution list that gives every rank up to master and every car- eer field sub-division some chanc- es for additional stripes. They have authorized pro pay at the P-l $30 a month level for eligible airmen to begin at the grade of airman second class. READY FOR MORE This group of Keflavik Airport Explorer Scouts recently spent a week- end at the Security Camp where they caught their share of German Browns. One lad took a trout that weighed approximately seven pounds. The group plans another outing to the lakes later this summer. U.S. AIR FORCE — AEROSPACE POWER FOR PEACE

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