The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 09.01.1976, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 09.01.1976, Blaðsíða 1
White Falcon Volume XXXII. Number 1 Ketta/k. Iceland January 9. 1976 AF eliminates max CONUS tours The Air Force has announced elimina- tion oi maximum tour lengths in the con- tinental Uni ted States, except in the Washington D.C. area. This action was brought about by interim changes to Air Force regulation 36-20 and regulation 39-11. Maximum CONUS stabilized tours are those which require reassignment because •t, tour completion. Major commands have Berally concurred with the turbulence i.eduction initiative to eliminate maxi- mum tours. As a result, a decision lias been reached to change CONUS maximum tours for officers and airmen to minimum tours, except for the following: (1) If officers and airmen are assigned to joint or departmental activities in the Washington D.C. area; (2) individuals assigned under the purview of DOD dire.c- | tive 1315.13, assignment of military personnel to the office of the Secretary of Defense, organization of the JCS and DOD agencies; (3) Officers and airmen assigned special duties outside their primary utilization areas. The minimum tour concept, which now applies to all CONUS stabilized tours except those indicated, stipulates that incumbents will become available for re- assignment after completion of the stab- ilization period but reassignment ac- tions will not be generated simply be- cause of tour completion. Personnel will be retained in place until reas- signment is necessary to meet oversea or higher priority requirements; to re- turn to rated duty or for other cogent reasons. Voluntary assignment options will also be available. Some respondents to this proposal, though concurring with the initiative, expressed concern for the lessened ca- reer broadening opportunities available by retaining personnel in desirable assignments (desirable because of duty or location) has drawbacks. By em- phasizing the minimum tour concept, the Air Force is eliminating automatic reas- signment upon tour completion. In this regard, selectively manned activities are encouraged to develop internal pro- cedures for senior management to review annually the assignment status of those incumbents who have completed the mini- mum stabilization period. Factors such as performance, experience, and individ- ual motivation should be considered. ^New scholarship program opens A new, two-year Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps (NROTC) scholarship pro- gram has been announced by the Navy Re- cruiting Command. This new program is open to active duty and inactive duty personnel as well as civilians. The program provides full tuition and fees, textbooks, and $100 a month for the last two years at one of 58 colleges and universities having NROTC units. Upon graduation, candidates will be com- missioned ensigns and incur four-year active duty obligations. Individuals selected for the program will attend six weeks of instruction at the Naval Science Institute, Newport, Rhode Island, during the summer before their Junior year. On completion of this course, students are appointed as jmidshipmen and enrolled in the NROTC holarship program. The program is open to United States citizens who are college sophomores at least 18 years old and who will be under 25 as of June 30 of the year college graduation is expected. A "C" average is required, and applicants must have completed a minimum of one semester of college physics and integral calculus. Applicants also must meet physical re- quirements for appointment as unrestric- ted line officers. Applications must be submitted to the Navy Recruiting Command Headquarters by May 1, 19 76. tl IT'S A BRAND-NEW YEAR, bringing renewed opportunity to build on the bright times. Every silver lining may have a dark cloud in front of it -- but the Bicentennial Spirit, the Spirit of '76, has been proven to be a force which dispels the dark clouds. Welcome to 1976--a year of promise. (Photo by PHAN Bob Grier) Awaits Senate approval House passes FY76 bill The House has approved the joint House Senate Conference Committee ver- sion of the $112,4 billion Department of Defense appropriations bill for FY76 and the three month transition period to the new fiscal year. The bill, which appropriates $37.2 billion for Navy programs, now goes to the Senate for final approval. The fol- lowing is a summary of FY76/77 actions: The conferees agreed that this year's budget will include funding for military commissaries, rejecting the Senate pro- posal to phase out appropriated fund support for commissaries over the next five years. More than $7.1 billion was appropri- ated for Navy military personnel sup- port. The conferees directed the Navy to convert enlisted services at Bachelor Officers Quarters and Commissioned Offi- cer Messes (closed) from appropriated funding to reimbursement, bringing the Navy in line with the other services. In other personnel action, the con- ferees reduced funding for Officer Grad- uate Training, for some full-time en- listed training and for some Navy Coun- selor positions. Tuition subsidies will no longer be provided for full-time de- gree completion programs. Additionally, the conferees directed the transfer of CONUS military postal operations to the United States Postal Service, with a July 1, 1976, target. Naval Reserve programs received $259.5 million. This is based on an average strength of 102,000 personnel. More than $11.2 billion was appropri- ated for general operation and mainten- ance programs including $3.22 billion for civilian personnel and $2.53 billion for the alteration, overhaul and repair of ships. Navy shipbuilding and conversion pro- grams received $4.2 billion. Funds were approved for new Trident and Los Angeles class submarines, a destroyer tender, two fleet oilers, nine patrol frigates and one patrol combatant missile (hydro- foil). More than $3.5 billion was approved for Navy aircraft procurement. This in- cluded $132,8 million for the proposed F-18. Nearly $1.5 billion was appropriated for weapons procurement. Procurement of the Condor missile system was made con- tingent upon successful completion of testing and notification to Congress by the Secretary of Defense that the system is ready to be released for production. Research, development, test and eval- uation programs were alloted $4.1 bil- lion. This includes funds for the close in weapons system, the maneuvering re- entry vehicle (MARV) program for the Trident missile system, the surface ef- fects ship and the Naval inshore warfare craft program. Dr. King's birthday A time for reflection by TSgt. Wash Brown During his lifetime he was both praised and condemned. Today, more than seven years after his death, the memory of this man is still controversial. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., born on January 15, 1929, still stands out as a major figure in the continuing evolution of civil rights as a constitutional issue of the highest national priority. The anniversary of his birth will be observed throughout the country this month, presenting all Americans with an opportunity for reflection. His life was spent in service and dedication to an overriding cause: fighting with dig- nity for recognition of the rights of Black people within the constitutional framework. He was not a violent man, yet his life was frequently marked by violent confrontation. Often arrested and jail- ed, he withstood the jeers of white hat- red and the derision of black militants. His own words serve best to summarize his philosophy—"We will not resort to violence. We will not degrade ourselves with hatred. Love will be returned for hate." His courage was an example not only to Americans but to the world. The Nobel Peace Prize recognized his cause and his quest. Yet, this man who preached, practiced and was acclaimed for non-violence became the target of an early, violent death. The irony should not be lost on us. The art of human relations is no easy task in our complex world. There is no greater challenge than to seek goals of peace, love and understanding through patience and persistent determination, refusing the cop-out of violence and hatred. The words inscribed on our National Archives building entrance state that "The Past is Prologue." So, too, there are lessons for the future to be learned from the life of this man whose birth we celebrate on January 15. Let us not turn our backs on the distance we have traveled, nor ignore the challenge of the miles that lie ahead. Spaulding new CO COMMSTA changes hands Monday Captain Ralph L. Spaulding will re- lieve Captain Walter J. Kraus as Comman- ding Officer, U.S. Naval Communication Station Iceland, in ceremonies Monday. The ceremony will include remarks by the Honorable Frederick Irving, U.S. Ambassador to Iceland. Capt. Spaulding came to Keflavik from Washington D.C. where he was assigned to the Operations Directorate, Joint Staff, Organization of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and assumed responsibilities for the planning, validation and programming of improvements to the National Military Command System. Capt. Kraus will transfer to the De- fense Communications Agency in Washing- ton, D.C. He has been the commanding of- ficer of NAVCOMMSTA Iceland since January 28, 1974. During his current tour, Capt. Kraus has been enrolled in after hours studies in Icelandic culture and lan- guage at the University of Iceland. He is married to the former Alice Francis Tookey of Branford, Connecticut. They have three children—John, a junior at the University of Wisconsin; Jeanne, a midshipman at the Merchant Marine Aca- demy, Kings Point, New York, and grad- uate of A.T. Mahan High School; and Carol, a high school junior. Capt. Spaulding is married to the former Helen Bell Huse of Eugene, Ore- gon. They have two sons, Ralph and Kevin, and two daughters, Kathryn and Kimberly. Ralph is attending the U.S. Naval Academy in the class of '79. The U.S. Naval Communication Station Iceland was first established in an "under development" status on April 15, 1961. It was designated "operational" on July 1, 1961. NAVCOMMSTA is a Com- munication Area Local Station North At- lantic, under the Communication Area Master Station, Londonderry, Ireland, adhering to the "Follow the Fleet" con- cept . AF register now obsolete The Air Force has done away with the time-honored sign-in and sign-out re- quirement for reassignments and tempo- rary duty, effective January 1. Once necessary to the personnel strength accounting system to track peo- ple on PCS and TDY assignments, the old procedure has outlived its usefulness. Since the advent of the advanced per- sonnel data system, Air Force Form 1323 has been a formality only. The actual departure-arrival inputs to the automat- ed data systems have been accomplished via other source documents. Vith Air Force members recording their departure date at the CBPO prior to leaving the losing base, and report- ing arrival information during in-pro- cessing at the new base, the PCS sign in/out register has become superfluous. Temporary duty accountability will now be tracked by unit inputs from TDY ord- ers. Navy correctional centers need POs Navy Petty Officers are needed for correctional duty. They will replace all Marine Corps personnel working in Navy Correctional Centers, beginning In June, 1976. Between June, 1976 and March 1977, more than 500 qualified volunteer per- sonnel, E-4 through E-9, are needed to fill these assignments. Personnel accepted will first receive training at the Army Military Police School, Ft. McClellan, Alabama. All interested personnel are encour- aged to apply to their detailers.

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The White Falcon

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