The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 13.02.1976, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 13.02.1976, Blaðsíða 1
White Falcon Volume XXXII, Numbers Kellavk, Iceland FebnmryO. ®7B Primary voting begins soon Three eastern states will be holding their 1976 Presidential primaries in early March. Voters from Massachusetts and Vermont can express their Presidential prefer- ences on March 2. If you are a member of the armed for- ces, a military spouse or dependent and a qualified Massachusetts or Vermont voter, all you have to do to obtain your absentee ballot is mail a completed and witnessed federal post card application to the city of town clerk, place of re- sidence. Massachusetts voters should enter their political party preference in item two of the application. You do not have to be registered to vote before applying for your absentee ballot for the March 2 primary. The Florida Presidential primary is scheduled for March 9. If you are a re- sident of Florida, send a completed fed- eral post card application to the Super- visor of Elections, your county of resi- dence. Be sure to put your political party preference in item two of the ap- plication and enter "March 9 primary" in item six. If you are registered to vote in Flo- rida, you will receive your absentee ballot right away. Floridians who are not registered voters will receive a re- gistration application. Fill this out and return it promptly to the Supervisor of Elections to obtain the primary bal- lot. Federal post card applications can be obtained at the base Legal Office. Det 3—A new name and plane Detachment 3, 552nd Airborne Early Warning and Control Group will be re- designated the Operating Location AA (OLAA) of Detachment 1 of the 20th Aero- space Defense Squadron on March 1. Actually, there will be no change of personnel or equipment. The unit will remain the same size with three EC-121 "Warning Stars" assigned to provide air- borne early radar warning and air de- fense surveillance in the North Atlan- tic. The only local change is the name. Det 3 has 51 PCS personnel who pro- vide support for the command's admini- stration, operations and maintenance functions. In addition, about 45 TDY aircrew personnel assist in operations of the three EC-121 aircraft. The detachment operates as seaward extention of the land-based radar." Det. 3 maintains a continuous alert response to provide additional radar early warning intercept control and meteorological data. Secondary missions include radar and radio assistance to aircraft crossing the North Atlantic and aiding rescue missions in any way possible. AWACS, the new version of an airborne early warning aircraft, using the Boeing 707 with new, computerized components will eventually replace the "Connie." Until then the EC-121 will continue to supply essential radar coverage other- wise not available in this area of the |world. So, while the name will change, the mission and unit will continue to operate and provide the same services it always has while stationed in Iceland. Lieutenant Colonel Ronald Ramsden will assume command of the new operating location here at Keflavik. He is cur- rently the Weapons Controller Supervisor for the 963rd AEW&C Squadron. Automobileinspectioncontinues this week for the following JO num- bers. Today JO-4806-5001 Wed J0-5369-5521 Mon JO-5002-5188 Thur JO-5522-5647 Tues JO-5189-5365 Fri JO-5649-5755 YOUR HANDS HAVE A VOICE ! Cinema exhibit in Reykjavik An exhibition on "The Beginning of French Cinema" is now open to the public at the French Library, located at Laufasvegur 12, near the American Embas- sy in Reykjavik. The exhibition, open seven days a week from 5 to 7:30 p.m., will close Feb. 22. The history of French film making, and prominent people of that profession, unfold before you in the form of motion pictures, a still photograph collection and numerous books and magazines. "The Pioneers of Cinema," "The Inven- tions of the Lumiere Brothers," "Georges Melies," and "Judex" are the four films continously shown at the exhibition. Two are English language presen- tations, while the other two are in French. More than 75 still photographs, taken from actual motion picture film, along with a good variety of books and maga- zines, present to the viewer those ac- tors and events of France's history in the cinema world from 1895 to 1975. The exhibition is sponsored by the French Library Film Club. Records to be converted The Bureau of Naval Personnel will begin converting enlisted personnel ser- vice records from paper' to microfiche Tuesday. The conversion, scheduled for comple- tion in October of 1977, will be made alphabetically. Each record will be screened and extraneous documents, such as duplicates or transmittal letters, will be removed prior to filming. The four-by-six inch microfiche cards can handle up to 98 pages of material. The schedule for conversion is: 1976 1977 A Feb. 17-Mar. 8 M Jan.l7-Mar. 14 B Mar. 9-Apr. 30 N Mar. 15-Mar. 24 C May 3-Jun. 15 0 Mar. 25-Mar. 31 D Jun. 16-Jul. 15 P Apr. 1-Apr. 29 E Jul. 16-Jul. 28 Q May 2 F Jul. 29-Aug. 18 R May 3-Jun. 2 G Aug. 19-Sep. 17 S Jun. 3-Aug. 1 H Sep. 20-Nov. 3 T Aug. 2-Aug. 23 I Nov. 4-Nov. 5 U Aug. 23 J Nov. 8-Nov. 24 V Aug. 24-Aug. 31 K Nov. 25-Dec. 16 W Sep. 1-Oct. 7 L Dec. 17-Jan 14 X Oct. 10 Y Oct. 10-0ct. 12 Z Oct. 13-0ct. 14 Since the actual conversion process is not accomplished at BUPERS, records in the process of conversion may not be available to an individual. Personnel desiring access to their records should consult the schedule. If the desired record is within five days of conversion (before of after), the individual should write the Chief of Naval Personnel (Pers 383), Department of the Navy, Washington, D.C. 20370, to determine if the record can be made available for review. Dispensary outlines policies for visitors Dispensary staff personnel are always on duty to give the best possible medi- cal care. To accomplish this, estab- lished guidelines must be followed. Each patient will be allowed two vis- istors at a time from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. and 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. has been designated as "quiet hour". Visitors should remember that pa- tients admitted for in-hospital care need rest. Keep your visit short and maintain quiet respect and restraint while on the ward. Your friend may be feeling well, but his roommate may not. Children under 16 may not visit the ward, nor may they be brought into the dispensary unless seeking treatment. This is to ensure that children are not unnecessarily exposed to communicable disease, and to decrease unnecessary traffic in the dispensary. Obstetrical patients may be visited by their husbands and parents ONLY. The hospital stay for these patients is three to four days, a period which they need for rest and getting acquainted with their new family member. The dispensary requests that interes- ted persons should not call the dispen- sary requesting any infoimation on pa- one parent from well as regular child is seri- remain at the tients and/or deliveries of newborn babies. This information cannot and will not be given over the telephone: only to immediate family members. Children admitted to the in-patient ward may be visited by 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. as visiting hours. When a ously ill, a parent may bedside. You may bring your child's formula or feedings,if he is taking sus- tenance other than regular formula or foodsy along with other items necessary during his stay and not normally sup- plied, such as diapers. It is also a good idea to bring his favorite toy or blanket for comfort while he is in dif- ferent surroundings. There are no facilities for visitors to eat in the dispensary. Smoking is permitted ONLY in the lounge on the ward. Visitors should not sit on the bed when they visit. Chairs are provi- ded. If there isn't a chair, please ask for one. You may bring gifts, magazines, books, a few flowers or a small plant. Your cooperation in following these visiting hours and guidelines will help all who are involved. Adm. Holloway speaks out on Navy's readiness Admiral James L. Holloway, the Chief of Naval Operations, testified recently before the House Armed Services Subcom- mittee on Seapower and Strategic and Critical Materials, on the subject of fleet readiness. In 1975, the CNO established fleet readiness as the primary objective for the Navy. Current fleet readiness and material readiness. Personnel readiness, according to Admiral Holloway, "depends on enough people of the necessary skills, training and experience, to properly operate and maintainthe ships, aircraft and weapons systems in the fleet." Recruiting, training, and retention programs to provide personnel stability are seen as prerequisites to progress in a wide variety of Navy programs, includ- ing material readiness. Admiral Holloway traces the Navy's existing problems in material readiness to accelerated "wear-out" rates which from higher operating tempos during the Vietnam War, inadequate numbers of qual- ified shipyard maintenance personnel, and inadequate funding for parts short- ages. Improvement in material readiness is a high priority item for the Navy. The Bosrd of Inspection and Survey has been tasked with providing detailed reports to the CNO on the material condition of the fleet. In addition to monitoring materials conditions through the inspection re- porting system, the Navy will improve material readiness through better sched- uling of support services and mainten- ance availabilities. Action is underway to improve the effectiveness of overhaul periods. In summing up the situation, Admiral Holloway explained that "steady progress toward increased fleet readiness is de- pendent on positive and continuous com- mand." He emphasized that although we have problems in material readiness, "we are not sweeping them under the rug." The admiral called on Congress for support in maintenance funding areas. "I see progress," he said, "But it takes time and we can expect criticism. Success depends on funding, retention of skilled people and positive leadership." Cut-backs on AF officers' program Career broadening re-assignments for Air Force Officers are the latest item being scrutinized as a result of the permanent change of station dollar crunch. Advice to commanders on career broad- ening is to "encourage it locally where possible.'' According to Major Roy Anderson, Di- rector of Personnel, Air Forces Iceland, "This program applies to CONUS, but does not usually apply for a short tour." The intent is not to do away with career broadening assignments. On the contrary, Military Personnel Center of- ficials stress that the personnel system must continue to provide officers with the wide range of experience necessary to prepare them for top level management jobs. The difference lies in re-empha- sized guidance on where those jobs will be provided. Attention focuses on local level career broadening. Methods recommended include assigning officers to positions of increased responsibility at their current base. The Major Command Addi- tional Duty Program will receive new em- phasis in this respect. Duty specialty changes and cross- training to fill command vacancies from their own resources are other suggested ways to career broadening outside the individual's primary specialty. Accord- ing to the Air Force MPC, career mana- gers will respond to such requests when- ever possible. Exceptions to the PCS restrictions are for such highly competitive career broadening programs as Air Staff Train- ing, Air Force Institute of Technology, and Professional Military Education (PME). At command level part-time, off- duty advanced academic curricula and on- base PME seminars and individual corres- pondence programs are being pushed as alternatives.

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