The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 20.02.1976, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 20.02.1976, Blaðsíða 1
.(White Falcon Volume XXXII. Number 7 Ketlavk, Iceland February 20. 1976 Fire Department wins again First place in international fire prevention contest The Naval Station Fire Department has won first place for its category in an. international fire prevention contest sponsored by the National Fire Protec- tion Association. This is the 13th consecutive year the fire department, under Chief Sveinn Eiriksson, has placed in the top three of its category. Last year, they won second place award. Naval Station Commanding Officer, Captain John R. Farrell, was notified of the award Tuesday. The fire department will receive a plaque and a letter of recognition from the NFPA. New rules for CHAMPUS The 1976/1977 military appropriations act prohibits payment under the Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Uni- formed Services (CHAMPUS) for nonemer- gency inpatient care when that care is available at a facility of the uniformed services within a 40-mile radius of the patient's residence. The new rule about nonavailability statements went into effect Feb. 9, the date the act was signed into law. Previously, a nonavailability state- ment for nonemergency inpatient care was required only for dependents of active duty personnel who lived with their sponsor, within 30 miles of a Uniformed Services Medical Facility that provided such care. Now a nonavailability state- ment must be issued in order for any beneficiary to be provided CHAMPUS funds for inpatient care within a 40-mile ra- dius. Limiting conditions The Defense Department's implementa- tion plan limits authorization for is- suing a nonavailability statement to commanders of uniformed services hospi- tals or their designated representative. The implementation plan also speci- fies certain conditions under which the commander of a uniformed services hospi- tal may issue a nonavailability state- ment to a beneficiary. Among the cond- itions are the following: — When a maternity patient resides more than 30 miles from a uniformed services hospital; — When a hospital commander determines that the situation imposes unreasonable cost an<* difficulty in getting the pa- tient to a uniformed services medical facility; — When a patient who has been receiving outpatient care from a civilian source requires hospitalization for the condi- tion and it is medically advisable that care continues from the civilian source. Another provision of the 1976/1977 military approprations act affects CHAMPUS payments for services of pastor- al counselors, family and child coun- selors, and marital counselors. Details for implementation of this provision are being worked out and will be announced as soon as they are available. Payment prohibited The other provisions of the act pro- hibit CHAMPUS payments in the following: — Special education, except when provi- ded as secondary to active psychiatric treatment on an institutional basis; — Treatment for obesity under certain conditions; — Any other service or supply which is not medically or psychologically neces- sary to diagnose or treat a mental or physical illness, injury, or bodily mal- function as diagnosed by a physician, a dentist or a clinical psychologist. These provisions support in law ad- ministrative steps taken last year by CHAMPUS officials. Again, details for their implementation are being worked out and will be announced as soon as they are available. CHAMPUS Advisors All CHAMPUS beneficiaries who believe they might be affected by any provision of the 1976/1977 military appropriations act that deals with CHAMPUS benefits and are not certain of the effect should check with a CHAMPUS advisor or health benefits counselor before receiving care if they wish CHAMPUS to share the cost. tJhen a CHAMPUS advisor or health benefit counselor is not available, write to CHAMPUS, Denver, Colo. 80240. The department was judged along with 56 other naval activities with daytime populations between 1,500 and 3,500. Of a total 1,139 entries from the United States and Canada in this year's con- test, 229 were municipal fire depart- ments, 129 industrial, 528 government and 183 military. The NFPA sponsors the annual competi- tion, now in its 49th year, to "provide recognition for positive efforts in the field of fire prevention." Halldor Marteinsson, Assistant Fire Chief, said Wednesday that "everyone on the Naval Station must share this award because our success is due to the great cooperation of the community." He cited support from the command, department heads and leaders on the base along with the efforts of the men at the fire department for success, but stres- sed the importance of community support and understanding. The fire department believes the key to fire prevention is an active educa- tion program, Marteinsson said. "Of course, we expect a fire now and then," he said, "but it is better to fight them before they ever get star- ted." While fire prevention is a year-long effort for the firemen, emphasis on its importance is stressed in August and October. The annual fire prevention program begins every August with Operation EDITH (Sxit Drill in the Home) when firemen visit homes on base, search for fire hazards and help occupants establish and practice exit drills for night fires, using secondary escape routes as a means. During fire prevention week in Oct- ober, base firemen appear on AFTV, spon- sor open houses at the fire station, speak to social organizations and at dependent schools on base, and conduct a station-wide information program through leaflets, posters and static displays. Naval Station Assistant Fire Chief Haraldur Stefansson is directly respon- sible for the base-wide fire prevention program. VP-56 Dragons complete eventful tour by Ltjg Pat If one were to combine Thanksgiving, Christmas, New Year's, Valentine's Day, and throw in some birthdays and anniver- saries, put them all in one day — it would come out as Feb. 24 to the men of Patrol Squadron 56, for those are the things the Dragons will celebrate when they are reunited with their families. It has been five months since VP-56's first P3C Orion set down to mark another Keflavik deployment for the Dragons. Led by Commander William H. Compton, the flight crews and ground personnel arriv- ed here with some trepidation having heard of 70 knot winds and chill factors of minus many. During peacetime the squadron monit- ors the sea lanes and investigates un- identified contacts. On one such mis- sion, Crew Four was reassigned to help in a search and rescue mission. Re- sponding to the call, the crew located 18 fishermen in liferafts and directed rescue ships to the area. In addition to normal operations, the squadron participated in the NATO ex- ercise "Ocean Safari 75," alongside units from Norway, Germany, Netherlands, and Great Britain. In the exercise the Dragons displayed the continuing readi- ness of American Forces while coordinat- ing with surface commands. On Dec. 10, the Dragons conducted a change of command in which Commander Crandall James E. McNulla relieved Cdr. Compton as the skipper. Included in the festiv- ities was the appearance of the Navy Steel Band to entertain the squadron's guests. The end of 1975 marked VP-56's eleventh straight accident-free year. The squadron is now approaching 100,000 consecutive accident-free flight hours. The Dragons recognized two of their own by selecting A01 Stanley Clay Sailor of the 3rd quarter and AZ2 Joe Girdner Sailor of the 4th quarter in 1975. Both men epitomized dedication and excellence in performance. In athletic endeavors, the squadron has enjoyed success in various fields. The basketball "A" team leads their league, and the raquetball team tied for first place and the bowing team also lead their league. In one inter-squad- ron football game, only two aviators broke bones. In addition to sports, the men of VP-56 pursued such hobbies as, slot machine speculation, snow flake collection, sun searching, and the most popular stereo buying. In order to minimize the ennui of daily missions and routine paperwork, the squadron participated in "Operation: Beer Jug," a NATO program to introduce other nations to each other's culture. While crews from other nations flew into Keflavik, 56's crews visited bases in Norway, Denmark, Belgium, Netherlands and Great Britain. Although operation missions were flown to and from these sites, the few days spent sightseeing and relaxing did much to invigorate lag- ging spirits. As the Dragons prepare for departure they wish a fond farewell to the many people who have shown them kindnesses during deployment. And balmy summer weather to the "Mad Foxes" of VP-5 .who relieve them.

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