The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 12.03.1976, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 12.03.1976, Blaðsíða 1
( White Falcon Vokme XXXII. NunberlO USO Tour coming soon "Delegation", a six-member musical troupe, will appear in concert at the NATO base Sunday through Mar. 22. The group, which plays rock, variety, nostalgia, Top Forty and soul, is spon- sored by USO Shows Heart of America. "Delegation" features two female ^^Kgers: Teri Green and Vicki Foutz V^xig with other members of Che musical entourage. The remaining four members are Kevin Avering, Bruce Burgess and Scott Taylor. Denny Crockett will accompany the group as their manager. The USO Show unit is scheduled to ar- rive tomorrow. Their concert schedule is as follows: Sunday 2:30 p.m. Andrews Theater and 9 p.m. Top of the Rock. Monday 10 a.m. depart for H-3 and return at 5 p.m. Tuesday 3 p.m. hospital visit and 9 p.m. performance at Grindivik. Wednesday "Delegation" has the day off. Thursday 10 p.m. show at Rockville. Friday 2 p.m. courtesy engagement at A.T. Mahan High School and 9 p.m. they will play at the CPO Club. Mar. 20 9 p.m. Midnight Sun. Mar. 21 2:30 p.m. USO courtesy concert and 9 p.m. at "0" Club. Mar. 22 3:45 p.m. a courtesy appearance at the Youth Center. Mar. 23 is another day off for the group. Mar. 24 "Delegation" departs. Kefbv*. Iceland March 12. 1079 Trident to be named 'Ohio* The first nuclear-powered trident missile submarine to be built for the Navy will be named in honor of the state of Ohio. The announcement was made recently by Secretary of the Navy J. William Midden- dorf. The sub will be the fourth ship to bear the name Ohio. The first was a converted merchant schooner that served in the War of 1812; a ship of the line which participated in the Mexican War; and the battleship Ohio (BB-12) of World War II fame. A fourth ship, battleship number 68, was authorized by Congress to bear the name Ohio in 1940, but con- struction of that ship was cancelled in ii>3. The Trident missile submarine Ohio is scheduled to be built by Electric Boat Division, General Dynamics Corp., at Groton, Conn. The keel-laying ceremony will be held April 10. The 16,800-ton vessel, will have a length of 560 feet, and will be manned by 14 officers and 140 enlisted men. Ohio will perform as an effective long- range strategic missile undersea launch- ing base for 24 missiles. Operating independently of other naval forces, Ohio will be capable' of providing faster patrol of larger areas for longer lengths of at-sea time, com- pared to present systems. Advanced quieting techniques and sonar systems will permit Ohio longer range detection and timely evasion of search forces. The first of her class, Ohio will bear the designation SSBN-726. U8 Ambmmdor gtft nnwpoat Frederic Irving, Ambassador of the United States to Iceland has been nominated by President Gerald R. Ford for the assignment as Assistant Sec- retary of the State for Oceans and International Enviroment and Scien- tific Affairs. Mr. Irving is due to depart in the near future after serv- ing In the Iceland post since October 1972. 35 years of service SPECIAL BICENTENNIAL USHER Captain Jack Pharris II, USMC, stands ready to greet guests at the USO's 35th birthday party. (Photo by J02 Jerry Foster.) Local groups help H. S. students Graduating seniors at A. T. Mahan High School have received scholarships from several base organizations in the past. These groups include: Parent-Teacher Organization, NCO Wives Club, Midnight Sundowners, Fleet Reserve Association, Officers' Wives Club, CPO Advisory Board, CPO Wives Club and the Keflavik Sports Officials Association. Scholarships have been awarded to seniors, ranging from $100 to $1000 in 1975. The Philippine-American Club will join the group of organizations in giv- ing awards this year. If any other base club is interested in sponsoring a scholarship to help defray the cost of post-high school education for the grad- uates, contact Mrs. Alford at the high school at 7625. The first organizational meeting for this year's scholarship committees will be held at the high school on Tuesday, March 23, at 1 p.m. Marine NCO promotions Promotions for Marine staff NCO's for March have been announced by Headquar- ters Marine Corps. One hundred thirty- seven advancements will be made in the top three enlisted grades. Four new sergeants major will be pro- moted, leaving five selectees on the waiting list. Four master gunnery ser- geants will also be promoted with five still awaiting advancement. There again will be no advancements to first sergeant for the five selectees on the list. There have been no promo- tions to first sergeant since November. Forty-one master sergeants will sew on their third rocker, with 122 still on the list. The largest allocations go to gunnery sergeants with 88 being promoted which leaves 1,263 still to be picked. The board to select sergeants for ad- vancement to staff sergeant is expected to report out on the eighth or ninth of March. The board which met in mid-Janu- ary is authorized to select 3,650 staff sergeants. The number of sergeants promotions that may be made during March has also been announced by Headquarters Marine Corps. Local commands will advance a total of 1,494 corporals to their third stripe. USO has birthday celebration To celebrate its 35th birthday, the USO Center held a celebration at the center Mar. 6. Rear Admiral Harold G. Rich addressed the gathering, expressing his thanks for the part in which USO has played in his life and the many ways USO may help military personnel. Ms. Diana Scarborough, incoming USO director, was introduced to the group by Ms. Eola Wakefield, outgoing director. Dutch 'Fox' in P-3C command Lieutenant Commander Willem Niessink has become the first Dutch Officer des- ignated "PPC." LCdr Niessink joins a select group of his U.S. counterparts, capable of commanding the complex multi- million dollar P-3C and its highly trained crew. LCdr Niessink reported to the "Fox Den" in the spring of 1975 for a two- year tour as a constituent of the offi- cer exchange program between the U.S. and allied navies. He is also among the first Dutch Officers to serve in U.S. Naval Aviation. A native of Den Helder, the home of the Dutch Navy, LCdr Niessink attended elementary and high schools there and entered the Dutch Maritime College in 1954. Upon graduation in 1956, he ser- ved as a ship's navigator and qualified as second mate in the merchant marine by 1959. Subsequently, he was drafted into military service and attended the Royal Netherlands Naval Academy. Upon gradua- tion, LCdr Niessink was selected to en- ter naval aviation as a navigator in the Dutch Number Four Squadron, flying the Grumman S-2 Tracker. In November of 1966, LCdr Niessink was assigned to the Dutch Naval Air Sta- tion De Kooy as a test pilot and flight instructor for academy cadets. He at- tended instructor pilots school in 1969 and. completed the combined Dutch Navy and Air Force flight syllabus in prepa- ration for a tour as exchange officer with the Dutch Air Force. From 1971 to 1974 he was stationed at Valkenburg Naval Air Station, an estab- lishment whose hospitality is legendary among the U.S. patrol squadron commun- ity. LCdr Niessink, his wife Annek, their son Peter, 14, and twin daughters Mar- jolein and Danielle, nine, live in Orange Park. "The Patriots", a troupe of baton students, performed both song and dance numbers. A slide presentation was shown which depicted "Americana" and Jeff Bovee and Bob Weekly lent a musical emphasis to the show on the piano and guitar and banjo. Starting the ceremony, a Marine Color Guard posted the colors. Cake and punch were served after the ceremony. USO offers programs to * military per- sonnel at 120 centers around the world in addition to it shows. Originally created to meet a war emergency just before the United States entered World War II, the USO became popularized through overseas tours. Such well-known guests as Bob Hope, Marlene Dietrich, Ann-Margret and Sammy Davis Jr. have toured with the USO shows since that time. Now USO sponsors shows to remote locations in 40 countries and military and Veterans Administration hospitals in the United States. Their programming enlarges upon assistance to young military families, services for minorities and women and aid to military travelers. Founded on Feb. 4, 1941, USO is the only civilian, voluntary agency which provides continuous service to military personnel. Leave 4sale* changes Some changes have been instituted by DOD affecting military leave poli- cy. Military members can now be paid for no more than 60 days accrued leave during a career. This policy change went into effect Feb. 10. Personnel who were paid for unused leave before that date may still be paid for up to 60 days in the future. The new policy means that if some- one sells back 15 days at one enlist- ment, he has only 45 days left to sell for the remainder of his career. Military members coming up for re- enlistment with leave in excess of 60 days accrued must use it, sell it, or lose it. Junior grade personnel who plan to reenlist should think about selling leave at a later date. Ac- crued leave payments are established on base pay. Members may benefit by waiting until later in their career to sell back their 60 days leave. Gustav Bergman, license instructor, presents Hjortur Hannesson, with the 15,000th Government Driver's License at the PW Transportation Office on Wednesday.

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The White Falcon

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