The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 02.04.1976, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 02.04.1976, Blaðsíða 1
•( White Falcon Volume XXXII. Number 13 Keflav*. Iceland April 2,1976 ^Many bases may close in CONUS Secretary of the Navy J. William Mid- dendorf II last week announced plans for a formal study of base realignment, re- duction and closure actions. According to Mr. Middendorf, the pro- posed actions, would save the Navy $56 million annually and would release near- ly 2,100 military personnel from support assignments to active combat units. The Navy will study the environmental impact of each of the proposed actions. The evaluation process is expected to take four to nine months. The major actions to be studied in- clude closing or reducing activity at NAS Key West, NAS Memphis and HAS Corpus Christi; consolidating Navy helicopter training (NAS Whiting Field) with Army and Air Force programs; restructuring NAS Saufley Field as a training-manage- ment complex; and closing or reducing the capacity of the Naval Hospital, Philadelphia. In other realignment actions, the Navy has completed the environmental im- pact assessment on two proposals. As a result, training squadrons one and five, NAS Saufley Field, will be disestablish- ed, and the international logistics con- trol office will be relocated from Bay- onne, N.J. to Philadelphia. Additionally, 45 Naval Reserve cen- ters and training facilities will be disestablished by June 30. These facil- ities merely are drill sites, having no civilian or active duty military person- nel assigned. These closures will re- duce administrative and maintenance costs. New Marine training A new concept for making Marine in- fantry squad training more realistic will be tested by Headquarters Marine Corps. The program is called "SCOPES" which stands for Squad Combat Operations Exercise and is designed to provide two- sided combat field training. Under SCOPES, a Marine is tested on his ability to detect and hit targets with live ammunition, plus his skill in reading numbers on an enemy's helmet through a telescopic sight and then taking that enemy under fire with blank ammunition. According to Headquarters Marine Corps planners, the program offers sev- eral skill sharpening aspects in ad- dition to providing realism in field ex- ercises. It gives squad leaders an op- portunity to appreciate the difficulties for the participants. In addition, it 'offers an opportunity to conduct small unit training without the entire Marine company present. The SCOPES concept will be tested during March by various units for field evaluation. Once the evaluation is com- plete, Headquarters officials will de- cide if SCOPES will become a standard Marine training method. JShow opens Tuesday A variety show, produced in conjunc- tion with the Bicentennial Celebration, will be held Tuesday and Wednesday at Andrews Theater. The show, consisting of 100 students and persons from the community, starts at 6:30 p.m. Originated by Elizabeth Nixon, Bicen- tennial coordinator, the variety show encompasses the Mississippi riverboat era. The steamboats, stopping off at ¦various river portsr would entertain the locil people with minstrel shows and humor. The variety show, produced by Joe Derrick, Barbara Brown and Tom Avery, will use a replica of the steamboat for its background. The performers, cos- tumed in the styles of 1830 to 1870, will bring this segment of American his- tory to life in 25 various acts. In planning for nine weeks, the acts range |from marching, baton twirling and in- strumental solos to singing, dancing and comedy skits. This family orientated show is open to everyone at no charge. DS2 GEORGE MORTON tests a piece of equipment for COMFAIRKEF staff dependents dur- ing the owi house. Watching the demonstration are Kellie and Bobby Weisenbeck, lower left and center, Stephen Reid, upper left and two other children. (photo by PH3 Rene1 Pearce) 11 more FFGs to be built The Naval Sea Systems Command has announced the awarding of contracts for the construction of the first eleven follow-on ships in the Navy's guided missile frigate program. The lead ship in the class, the Oliver Hazard Perry, FFG-7, is presently under construction at the Bath Iron Works, Bath, Maine. Five more of the new frigates will be constructed by the Bath Iron Works, and the other six will be constructed at Todd Shipyards Corpo- ration, Seattle, Washington, and San Pedro, California. Perry-class frigates will be 445 feet long, 45 feet at the beam and displace 3,600 tons. They are equipped with standard and harpoon missiles, a 76mm gun, torpedoes, and two "lamps" heli- copters. Their primary mission is to provide protection for underway replenishment groups, amphibious forces and military and merchant shipping against subsur- face, air and surface threats, and to conduct operations in conjunction with other sea control forces tasked with the protection of our sea lines of communi- cations. Navy Commissaries feel FY76 money crunch Navy Commissary Stores worldwide face adjustments of service levels to counter increased costs of operation during the first six months of the current fiscal year. The Navy Resale System Office has ordered individual commissaries to make necessary adjustments to keep expendi- tures within authorized budget levels for the rest of FY 76. "We have reduced our staff by dis- charging eight part-time employees, '" said Warrant Officer Earl Donnellon, officer in charge of the NATO Base Com- missary Store. "There will be no change in the op- erating hours of the commissary," ex- plained CW03 Donnellon. The NATO Base Commissary has had to rearrange person- nel work schedules to obtain greater flexibility to provide service during peak sales periods and minimize customer inconveniences. "The adjustments we have made here will have very little effect as far as our patrons are concerned," added CW03 Donnellon. "We try to provide all the service we can." Marine uniform changes scheduled soon The results of the most recent Marine Corps uniform board have been released, and have set the stage for some long- awaited changes. Two of the more far reaching deci- sions are the deletion of the barracks cover from general use and the adoption of camouflage utilities for all marines. The elimination of the barracks cover or frame cap and its cloth covers from the initial allowance list for recruits could save the Marine Corps more than $500,000 a year. It will be retained, however, in the supply system for use by marines on special assignments and for purchase for wear with the dress blue uniform. The adoption of camouflage utilities will begin later this year with recruits receiving two sets of the new uniform along with two sets of the present cot- ton sateen uniform. In conjunction with the new utili- ties, a new camouflage cap is also under study. Several styles are under con- sideration, but the most popular appears to be a duck hunter's hat which features a sloping crown and a brim completely around the cap instead of a bill. New utilities are also planned for women marines. The present blue women's utilities are not suited for wear in the more physical jobs women marines are now doing. The new uniform will consist of a jacket, short sleeve shirt, slacks, utility cap and boots. Camouflage utilities are also beinj tested for women in order to achievi uniformity with the new camouflage uni- form for men. The uniform board also took steps to revise regulations in order to allow women to wear rifle and pistol marksman ¦ ship badges. The beltless service coat, which had been discussed as a possible replacement for the standard green service coat, has been abandoned. The Commandant, General Lewis Wilson, had worn a beltless coat to test the idea, and he received over- whelming support for retaining the belt. Also of good news to marines is the study to adopt a combination overcoat- raincoat to replace the two items now used. The coat would be cut along the trench coat design with a zip-in lining for cold weather. The coat will also be of a color compatible with both the ser- vice and dress uniforms. Headquarters Marine Corps will be re- leasing more information in the near future on these uniform changes. COMFAIRKEFLAVIK Open house A group of 130 Commander Fleet Air Keflavik dependents participated in a tour of COMFAIRKEFLAVIK last week. The "open house" provided an opportunity for the wives and children to view their sponsor's work areas, as well as pre- senting an overall view of the staff mission. . The tour was divided into four ses- sions to accommodate the large group. Captain A. W. Howard, Jr., chief of staff, welcomed the first group and ex- pressed his appreciation for the fine support they have provided their hus- bands/fathers during the tour in Ice- land. All of the groups received pres- entations on the functions of the staff by key members of the command. The groups were given a Command/Air Force presentation followed by a tour of the data processing division. A movie on the P3C Orion aircraft was viewed be- fore touring the communications spaces and the computer room. After touring the analysis section, the visitors high- lighted their day by visiting a P3C Orion from VP-5. The tour proved educational as well as enjoyable for all. Refreshments were served as all remained to discuss the events of the day. nailOIIAL DEFEIISIUE DRIUinB tUEEh This week is National Defensive Driv- ing week for 1976. The Defensive Driv- ing Campaign is a campaign to save lives, prevent human suffering and economic waste by preventing traffic ac- cidents. The National Safety Council tries to prevent accidents by creating better driving. It creates better driv- ers by teaching the accident-avoidance techniques found in the National Safety Council's Defensive Driving Course. The course is taught on the NATO Base by CM1 Julio Velez of the Public Works License Office. The course is open to both military members and dependents. "Anyone who needs to get a govern- ment driver's license or renew his license has to take the course unless he has gone through it in the past year," said Licensing Petty Officer Velez. "The course is also required for people who have accumulated six violation points from traffic court here," he added. Traffic accidents are the leading cause of accidental deaths in the United States. They claimed more than 45,000 lives in 1975. As of January 1976, over two million persons in the U.S. have died since the first recorded motor ve- hicle death. Driver error is still the major cause of traffic accidents and accounts for approximately 85 per cent of all traffic accidents. Drivers can drive better by learning the techniques of defensive driving. The single most important asset you will gain from the Defensive Driving Course is knowledge. Knowledge that will en- able you to recognize driving hazards, understand the proper defense and act in time to avoid an accident. That is the kind of knowledge that can literally mean the difference between life and death. The time to prevent accidents is be- fore you are involved in a crash. For information on the Defensive Driving Course, call the Naval Station License Office at 7109.

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