The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 16.04.1976, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 16.04.1976, Blaðsíða 1
•C White Falcon Volume XXXII. Number 15 KeflBv*. fcetand y*pr*7 76, 7976 Rescue mission successful 500 miles north of NATO Base Thirteen Norwegian seamen were res- cued from an ice floe more than 500 miles north of the NATO Base late Wed- nesday afternoon, after their ship was broken up by moving pack ice. Another Norwegian ship plowed through drifting ice to reach the stranded men to end anr extensive rescue effort which ¦fcivolved a Detachment 14 HH-3 Jolly Bt-een Giant helicopter and an HC-130 rescue Hercules, and a Patrol Squadron 5 P3C Orion. The mission began unfolding late Tuesday afternoon, less than 48 hours after a mission in the same area where an injured Norwegian seaman was evacu- ated from the Norwegian ship Harmony m €d9T£R m> PrtSTOVO M€SfllGe ^^Tr 1 Passover and Easter once again focus our attention on the importance-rand the practical effects of the Christian and Jewish faiths. This holiest season for Jews and Christians alike is a time for introspection and rededication. Pass- over and Easter speak to our lives and conduct a time of redemption and beginning anew. This season of the year for our Jew- ish brethren is a time of gratitude for God's deliverance of their people out of Egyptian bondage and His fulfilled promise of leadership into the Promised Land. The Passover celebrations provide emphasis for prayers for the peace of Jerusalem and prayerful efforts for the liberty of all those who lack the free- dom which we as Americans enjoy in our „ation. The Exodus story is a vital in- iration to each of us that our lives re to be given to the cause of morality and freedom. Holy Week and Easter commemorate for Christians the death and resurrection of the Lord. Christ is risenl Christians are bound by love to the Christ who reigns everlastingly. "We know that we have crossed the frontier from death to life because we love our brothers1.' They returned to rusalem with great joy...." "To the ace of overwhelming defeat they re- turned in joy, victory and power. The resurrection of Christ is our heritage of new victory, new life and new joy. Protestant Holy Week sevices: Today, 7 p.m., Good Friday...a service that is a dramatic reminder of the mean- ing of Christ's death. Sunday, 6 a.m., Easter Sunrise Service., "...at early dawn..." Kunday, 8 a.m., at the USO, breakfast nd the gospel. Sunday, 10 a.m., Episcopal/Lutheran Holy Communion. Sunday, 11 a.m., Christ's people will rejoicel Sunday, 2 p.m., Easter Service at the University of Iceland Chapel, Reykjavik. Sunday, 7 p.m., Easter Evangelistic Ser- vices. Catholic Holy Week Services: Koday, 3 p.m., Good Friday.. .Mass of the ord's suffering, lommorow, 7 p.m., Holy Saturday ... Liturgical Ceremonies. Sunday, 9 a.m., Easter Sunday Mass. Sunday, 5:30 p.m., Easter Sunday Mass. € after he suffered a stroke. On that mission, the combined efforts of the Detachment 14 HC-130, the United King- dom ship Olwen, and the Iceland Life Saving Association and Coast Guard As- sociation, along with the Iceland De- fense Force Rescue Coordination Center, were credited with saving the man. Tuesday afternoon, at approximately 4:45 p.m., a distress signal from the Fortuna was picked up by a station in Bodo, Norway, reporting the vessel was breaking up and the crew was abandoning ship. Rescue HC-130's from both the Defense Force Rescue squadron and a Danish group operating out of Mesters Vig, Greenland, were launched at 6:45 p.m. with winter survival clothing, radio, food supplies and sleeping bags. Meanwhile, the Fortuna crew had begun walking toward the Harmony, believed at that time to be trapped in ice some 15 miles slightly northeast of where the Fortuna had broken up. The Defense Force Hercules dropped supplies to the party, which reported by radio they were in good physical condi- tion. Observations by the two HC-130's, however, confirmed that Harmony was 25 miles, not 15, from the party, and a (continued on page 4) . r -r\. • ,. ¦ ~ - . .-.... v»« : •- ¦ J K' . .;¦ (photo by David B. Lester) Ambassador and Mrs. Irving leave Iceland with fond memories and many new friends AF doctor honored Air Force Captain (Dr.) Chris Davis, the Air Forces Iceland Flight Surgeon, has recently been selected as the Aero- space Defense Command's Flight Surgeon of the Year. Selection is highly com- petitive and is based on outstanding performance within the command. His professionalism, deep concern and compassion have earned Dr. Davis praise from everyone. While being stationed in Iceland, he has improved the medical capabilities at Hofn by instituting an aggressive training program for medical technicians assigned there. He works with Det. 14/Air Rescue and Recovery in support of rescue missions. In addition, he also provides medical support to the other Air Force units in Iceland as well as dependent care. Dr. Davis received his medical train- ing at George Washington University School of Medicine. Before attending there he received a degree in biophysics from Massachusetts Institute of Technol- ogy. In July, Dr. Davis will compete with flight surgeons in the Air Force Com- mands for the Malcolm I. Grow Award fbr Flight Surgeon of the Year. Bus schedule changes Base bus schedules will be changed Monday in a continuing effort to pro- vide necessary service to the NATO Base community, the Public Works De- partment said this week. The recently designated "Blue Bus Route" which replaced the former "Brown Bus Route" will begin operat- ing on a schedule similar to the pre- vious route, Monday. The "Blue Bus" no longer will run through family housing areas, but will make runs in the barracks area every 20 minutes between the hours of 6 to 8 a.m.; 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.; and 4 to 6 p.m. The Blue Bus will service the ramp area. The Base buses no longer will make stops on the ramp. Lieutenant Paul McGonigle, Public Works Transportat- ion Officer said base commuters did not use the bus for ramp transport- ation enough to warrant its continu- ation. He said dropping the ramp area from the Base bus schedule will help drivers better conform to their 30 minute schedules. Printed copies of the revised schedule will be available to the public in the near future._________ by JOCS James Johnston "Iceland is a fascinating place," Mrs. Dorothy Irving remarked. "We have been very happy here, and we have made many good friends these past three years." Ambassador and Mrs. Frederick Irving leave Iceland April 21 for Washington, D. C, where he will assume his new post as Assistant Secretary of State for Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs. "I am very pleased with this new as- signment," the Ambassador said. "I've come to be considered something of an expert on oceans as a result of my as- signment in Iceland. And," he added,"I am not totally unfamiliar with the role of scientific affairs in foreign rela- tions." In 1958, Ambassador Irving helped set up the Office of Scientific Affairs, the forerunner of the bureau he has been appointed to head. The Bureau of Oceans and Internation- al Environmental and Scientific Affairs, established less than two years ago, is principally responsible for the formu- lation and implementation of policies and proposals concerning oceans and the scientific and technological aspects of United States relations with other coun- tries and international organizations. The bureau's responsibility covers a wide range of foreign policy issues and global problems relating to oceans, fisheries, environment, population, nu- clear technology, new energy technology, outer space, other fields of advanced technology and cooperative efforts deal- ing with the application and transfer of technology. "It is an asset for me to have been assigned as Ambassador to Iceland," Mr. Irving said. "I have learned a lot that will help me in my new assignment. Ice- land's existence depends on the oceans." Ambassador and Mrs. Irving, both photo hobbyists, have travelled exten- sively in Iceland. Their favorite loca- tion is Thingvellir. They encourage A- mericans to get out and travel around Iceland and learn the customs and his- tory of the country, and meet the peo- ple. "Of course, there is a language 1 bar- riers but if you look, you can find peo- ple with interests similar to yours. In this way, the cultural obstacles become only temporary," the Ambassador said. Ambassador Irving said the most mem- orable event of his three years in Ice- land was the major role he played in the modification of the 1951 Defense Agree- (Story continued on page 3.)

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