The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 30.04.1976, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 30.04.1976, Blaðsíða 1
White Falcon Vokme XXXII. Number 17 Ketlav*, Iceland April 30, 1978 BMAG seeks local ideas The Air Force is seeking ideas from 'its personnel on improvements in organiz- ational structures, procedures, functions and policies, which will produce savings in monetary, material and manpower ex- penditures. To perform this funtion, a Base Management Action Group (BMAG) has been established by the USAF Chief of Staff. The BMAG will receive inputs from lo- cal committees at all AF activities and installations and explore them as avenues for reducing base operating support costs. The prime difference between BMAG and the AF Suggestion Program, is that BMAG is concerned with verbal, rather than written, inputs from individual con- tributors. Also, BMAG suggestions need not be evaluated and adopted at the local level prior to submission to Headquarters USAF. Suggestions previously turned down in the AF Suggestion Program may be re- submitted through BMAG channels. A commitee, composed of the Junior Officer's Council and Enlisted Advisory Council, has been formed to collect ideas from AF personnel stationed in Iceland, for forwarding to the BMAG. Interested personnel may present their ideas by appearing at the Naval. Station Conference Room, Bldg. 752, on Thursday or Friday 1 to 2 p.m.or by contacting one of the following individuals during this week: Capt. Schauz (7227), 1st Lt. Cres- cenzo (4108), IstLt. Tota (4224), 2nd Lt. Connell (Rockville Ext. 38), TSgt.' Chil- vers (4315), SSgt. Acevedo (4496), or A1C Stewart (6231). The program will run until May 15. If you have any ideas for improvements or resource savings, let the BMAG hear them — all it takes is a phone call. AF guarantees follow-on base Eligibility criteria for the Air Force's home basing program have been further defined in a recent letter to all consolidated base personnel offices. The home basing program offers airmen with dependents the opportunity to apply for a guaranteed follow-on assignment back to their current CONUS station, upon notification of selection for a short overseas tour. Under the new rules, airmen who are assigned to an ac- companied tour of less than 18 months are now eligible to apply for home basing. Airmen who did not have the oppor- tunity to apply before going overseas are eligible to apply until June 30, 1976. After that date, applications must be submitted before departure from a CONUS base. Airmen who are serving in special duty assignments are not eligible for the program. Examples of this category are departmental or joint assignments, and duty with defense agencies. Home basing was introduced to reduce the number of designated dependent moves by allowing airmen to return from overseas to their current bases in re- turn for not moving their dependents out of the local area while away. Airmen are still permitted to make their desig- nated family move when they are selected for an unaccompanied overseas location, but by doing so, they give up eligibil- ity for the home basine Droeram.. Those selected for a home basing as- signment and presently living in base quarters may apply to keep their family in those quarters while they are over- seas. If continued quarters is not pos- sible, the airman can still move his family within the local area and remain eligible for home basing. ALTHOUGH THERE IS STILL SNOW on the ground, Icelandic summer is more than a week old. Now is the time to start thinking of summer activities here in Iceland like camping, hiking, fishing or just getting out and having a look around. (photo by JOCS James Johnston) Sec. Def. speaks on mil. balance Secretary of Defense Donald H. Rums- feld said at the 125th anniversary din- ner of Reuters News Service in New York recently: "What happens to the worldwide mili- tary balance in the years ahead will have a profound effect on world stabili- ty for the rest of this century. - "The decisions we make now will con- tribute to shaping the future for the next two decades, just as the decisions made over the past two decades have molded the situation we now face. "Let me emphasize one point: There is far more at stake than merely the relative military positions of two superpowers. "We are the world's leading democra- cy, just as the Soviet Union is the most powerful autocracy in the world. The wisdom and durability of our free system of government is, in a very real sense, on trial. If we become vulnerable to the threats and pressures of potential adversaries, we will have shown to the world that a nation governed by consent is incapable of the steadiness of pur- pose necessary to survive in a difficult and challenging world. "I believe that free people, when in- formed, will demonstrate the prudence and foresight needed to recognize and counteract dangers that can undermine their liberties. "The balance of which I speak is nec- essary for many reasons. At the most basic level, it ensures our country's physical safety against attack. But there are other reasons: — Our allies must know that they can, with our help, withstand either overt attack or the more subtle, in- direct diplomatic and economic pressures that in the absence of such confidence, can erode the will and ultimately the ability to resist. — Our views and values must be given the weight and importance they merit in our dealings with those whose interests differ from ours. — We must encourage the support of those whose resources and cooperation we desire, but who might otherwise think it necessary to establish a more accommo- dating relationship with potential ad- versaries. — And we must ensure and make real- istic our own will and confidence in supporting our interests, our allies and our ideals in a difficult, untidy, and uncertain world." May brings warmer days and lighter winds The beginning of the Arctic summer becomes evident in May with longer days, warmer temperatures and lighter winds. Snowfall becomes negligible however there is still a slight chance of some snow. The Jet Stream continues to mi- grate northward during the month, but it becomes weaker and more disorganized and as a result stagnant weather systems become common. Temperatures climb 5.4F (0.3C) from April, reaching a mean of 43.9F (6.6C). The most frequent wind direction contin- ues to be from the northeast, but south- erly winds become more common. Speeds are less than 11 knots 47.5% of the time, a marked improvement over April. The highest gust ever recorded was from the east-southeast at 59 knots for May. Chill Index II occurs less than 50% of the time, and Chill Index III is essen- tially non-existent. Rain or drizzle can be expected on 68.3% of the days, while the occurance of snow drops to 9.2% of the days and a total accumulation of only 0.2 ins. (0.51cm) can be expected. Cloudiness changes little from April with overcast skies prevailing 45.1% of the month. Fog can be expected on 28.2% of these days. The increase in hours of daylight becomes quite noticeable in May. On the first the. sun rises at 5:03 a.m. and sets at 9:53 p.m. and by the end of the month, sunrise is at 3:31 a.m. with sunset at 11:27 p.m. This amounts to a gain of three hours and one minute of daylight. It is also significant to note that by May 31, the hours between sunset and sunrise are still a period of usable light: termed civil twilight. New AF T-l-S for E-2s, E-3s The Air Force Military Personnel Cen- ter has announced a couple of changes in time in service requirements for the lower grade Airmen. Effective June 1, 1976, the minimum time-in-service (TIS) requirement for promotion to E-2 will be extended from the present four months to six months. This change came about as a result of a recent change directed by the Office of the Secretary of Defense. Airmen who enter the Air Force on or after June 1, 1976, will not be eligible for promotion until they have completed six months of service. The Air Force says waivers of this policy will only apply to Airmen who enter under current waiver authority such as Civil Air Patrol or ROTC graduates. As a result of the extended TIS re- quirements for promotion to E-2, the Air Force at the same time will shorten the time in grade requirement for promotion to E-3, from eight months to six months service. This change, also effective on June 1, will apply to those enlistees who enter the service oh or after that date, except for Airmen falling under current waiver authority. Enlistees be- fore June 1 will still be required to complete a minimum of eight months time in grade. Final booth sign-up Friday is the last day to sign-up for a booth at the -May 15 Flea Market spon- sored by Family Services. Individuals or organizations can have booths at the Flea Market. Participants can sell what ever they like including food, handi-crafts, white elephant arti- cles and furniture. Family Services takes 20 percent of the day's profits ¦and the remainder belongs to the group or individual. About 30 booths already have been reserved. If you are interested, just call Family Services at 5209 or stop by building T193. The Base Nursery will be open from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. on the day of the Flea Market. This year the Flea Market will in- clude a drawing for many items and an auction. People having a few large items they would like to sell can have them auctioned off. Just contact Family Services for more information. The Family Services Center uses the money from the Flea Market to replace or buy new articles for the "Loan Closet." The Loan Closet has dishes, utensils, linens and many other things which are loaned to people. ,pv"T'°.v Bicentennial Plans begin Plans for this year's Fourth of July Bicentennial Celebration are be- ing formulated. A special planning meeting will be held Wednesday, May 12 at 1 p.m. in the Naval Station conference room, building 752. .-All persons, groups and organizations interested in estab- lishing concessions, entering a float in the parade, or simply providing recommendations, ideas or assistance for the celebration should attend this meeting. The coordinator for the Bicenten- nial is Lieutenant Jim Bullock. You can contact him at ext. 7903/7904 for further information. Lieutenant Bullock said it is es- sential for those interested in par- ticipating in the Bicentennial cele- bration to attend the May 12 meeting.

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