The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 14.05.1976, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 14.05.1976, Blaðsíða 1
White Falcon Volume XXXII. Number 19 Ke/tev*. Iceland May 14, 1976 Flea Market opens tomorrow A flea market, sponsored by the Per- «al Services Center, will be held to- row from 1 to 6 p.m. at Hangar 885. The public is invited to attend, and warm outerwear is suggested. Thirty-five booths will be featured at the semi-annual event. The booths will be manned by base groups. Some of the booth sponsors are the USO, Girl Scouts, Boy Scouts, Cub Scouts and the Youth Center. Others will be the Frosty Fingers Garden Club, Aero Club and the Puffin Toastmistress Club. Both the CPO Wives' Club and the Marine Wives' Club will host a bake sale. Additional refreshments will include hot dogs, popcorn and soft drinks. The USO will feature a pet rock dis- play. An auction will begin at 1:30 p.m. "Skip" Duquette will be the auctioneer. Individual auction items are a black vinyl sofa bed, metal cabinet, single bed, stereo console unit, a handmade wall clock, a camping tent, large oak barrel, a humidifier and an Early Ameri- can baby dressing table and studded snow tires. A drawing will be held during the flea market. EXPERIENCE ICELAND by participating in the Summer page 3). 3us Tours '76. (Sae story 0" (photo by JOCS James Johnston) Retirement pay—a matter of points . . . Members of the Naval Reserve may qualify for retirement pay after com- pleting 20 years of qualifying service— but what constitutes "qualifying ser- vice?" Understanding this term is essen- tial in calculating whether one is enti- tled to retirement benefits. One year of qualifying service is earned when the reservist earns a mini- mum of 50 retirement points. One point is earned for each day of active duty, or each day of active duty for training (ACDUTRA); one point is also awarded for each authorized drill attended, whether pay or non-pay; points are awarded in varying amounts for completion of ap- proved correspondence courses; and 15 points are credited for each year of ac- tive status membership in a reserve com- ponent . The maximum number of points which can be earned in a year are 365, or 366 in a leap year, but no more than 60 points can be credited from the combina- tion of drills, correspondence courses and membership in the Reserve. Unlike regular Navy members who are eligible for retirement pay upon separa- tion after completing a minimum number of qualifying years, the earliest re- tirement pay for an inactive duty re- servist starts at age 60. However, there are certain stipula- tions. One of these is that the last eight years of qualifying service must have been as a member of a reserve component. Other requirements state that the re- tiree must not be eligible for or re- ceiving any other retired pay for mili- tary service, and if the reservist was a member of a reserve unit before Aug. 15, 1945, he must have served on active duty during either World War I, World War II, or Korean Conflict. Social Security and Civil Service re- Scout earns Eagle Award Boy Scout Troop 364 held a Court of Honor to promote 16 year-old Scout William Young to Eagle Scout, Scouting's highest honor, Tuesday at the Officers' Club. Bill Young is the son of Lieutenant Colonel and Mrs. James Young. LtCol. Young is the commander of the 932nd AC&W Squadron at Rockville. At the Indoor Trail Ceremony, a candlelight ceremony, the guest of honor was Rear Admiral Harold G. Rich, Com- mander Iceland Defense Force. RAdm. Rich spoke about the attitudes a boy gains from Scouting which will benefit him throughout life. Bill's climb to the honor started in October 1967 at Malmstrom AFB and Troop 190. His stay with this troop was short, due to his father's transfer to Hawaii. In Hawaii, Bill advanced to Star Scout. Another transfer found Bill in New York where he earned the Life Scout award. "Only about one percent of all scouts will ever attain the rank of Eagle Scout," said Will Dell, Scout Commis- sioner. In order to earn the Eagle Award, a scout must earn 24 Merit Badges, be less than 18 years-old, he must be a troop officer and he must perform a service project. Bill's ser- vice project is especially noteworthy. He elected to work with the Syracuse, New York Multiple Sclerosis Society dur- ing his Easter break from high school. He also helped his mother with a patient who was in her care. MS tirement pay may be received concurrent- ly with Naval Reserve or Regular retire- ment pay. The rate of retirement pay is based on a formula which employs the total number of points earned. A reasonably accurate method of determining retired pay is to credit two and one-half per cent for each year of satisfactory serv- ice. The total number of retirement points credited are divided by 365 and the result is multiplied by two and one- half per cent of the base pay of the giade in which the reservist will retire at age 60. A reservist doesn't have to separate from a drilling unit upon reaching the minimum number of qualifying years. On the contrary, depending on the needs of the service and his unit, he can con- tinue as an active member in either the USNR-R or USNR-S-1. This membership will afford the reservist increcised re- tired pay by the accrual of additional points. Additionally, the extra years of service also increased the base re- tirement pay. Two other options are available to reservists once they have the minimum number of retirement qualifying years. They may transfer to the Retired Re- serve, where no additional points are accrued, or they may resign or be dis- charged which places them on the retired list and not subject to recall for ac- tive duty. For more information on the advanta- ges of joining the reserves after your active duty obligation is completed, see your career counselor. 'Slowest to fastest mode' travel time The Defense Department has issued a change in the method of computing travel time incident to military permanent change of station moves. The new guidance came out in a memo from the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Manpower and Reserve Affairs, dated March 31, 1976. As of the first of May travel time is computed in the order of the slowest to the fastest mode used....that is....pri- vately owned vehicle first, then sur- face , then commercial air. This compu- tation is made without regard to the or- der of actual travel. Previously, trav- el time was computed based on a ratio of the actual types of travel used to reach the final destination. Under the new guidance, the distance traveled by each mode will be the dis- tance between the points shown on the service member's itinerary as derived from the official table of distance. However, the constructive travel time authorized for P 0 V is based on one day for each 300 miles, or any fraction of 330 miles in excess of 150 miles. Travel time authorized for commercial transportation is based on one day for each 18 hours of travel time, or any fraction of 18 hours. To compute travel time in hours when using commercial surface transportation, it is one hour for each 40 miles travel- ed. For commercial air travel, it is one hour for each 500 miles traveled. PWOC hold banquet by Bob Herskovitz The Protestant Women of the Chapel (PWOC) held their annual Mother and Daughter Banquet at the A.T. Mahan Lower School, Monday. The dinners are held every year with a different theme. This year's theme was the Bicentennial. The evening's ceremonies started with an awards presentation to mothers in three different categories: the youngest mother with a daughter present, the old- est mother with a daughter present and the mother with the most daughters pres- ent . There was a Barber Shop Quartet to provide entertainment. They gave the evening an air of the Gay Ninety's. Navy Chaplain (Lieutenant) Stanley icCreary was on hand to say grace. After the meal, Dolores McCulloch sang a song. Her song was followed by a speech by Sharon McNike, president of PWOC, on the "Meanest Mother." This was followed by the highlight of the eve- ning, a Bicentennial Fashion Show with commentator Justine Lionberger. Fashions included clothing worn by Pilgrims on up through the ages includ- ing a cowboy, an Indian, a Flapper, even a cheerleader from the Fiftys, and some of the fashions of today as well. AF proposes pay-back, do it yourself moves EAGLE SCOUT BILL YOUNG is congratulated by one of his many well wishers at an Indoor Trail Ceremony Tuesday. The Air Force is reminding its mem- bers that do-it-yourself moves may save time and the government money during permanent change of station (PCS) and temporary duty (TDY) moves. There are currently two types of self-moves that can be used by members. A third may soon be on the way. In all three, the member personally handles the move instead of a commercial mover. In the first of three do-it-yourself moves, the member contracts with a car- rier of his choice and is reimbursed by the government. In the second type of move, the Traf- fic Management Office enters into a con- tract with a participating self-haul company. The company furnishes the van and packing materials and gives the mem- bers an allowance for fuel, oil, tolls and special permits. The carrier subse- quently bills the government for the a- mount of the rental and their payment to the member. The third type of move is awaiting Department of Defense approval. It would operate basically the same as the second type of move. The difference is that when the move is completed by the member, the government will compare the cost of the move to what it would cost under a normal motorvan move and give back to the member some of the savings from the self-move. The member's share of the savings has not been set. Officials say it may a- mount to as much as a 50/50 split. If approved, officials expect from 10 to 25 percent of all PCS and TDY moves to be made by this method. The plan of- fers savings to the government and of- fers the members some monetary incentive to use the system.

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The White Falcon

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