The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 04.06.1976, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 04.06.1976, Blaðsíða 1
White Falcon VoUne XXXII. Number 22 Kefto/k. Iceland June 4, 1976 Community Day Two thousand visit Hangar 885 An estimated two thousand Americans and Icelanders attended Community Day activities in Hangar 885 last Thursday. Naval Station Security said patrolmen parked some 400 cars on the ramp, and there were 'buses that delivered visi- tors to the area. The event was the first Community Day the NATO Base has had. It gave military service members, civilian employees, their families and guests an opportunity to examine Defense Force equipment and"" installations. Outside the hangar there were several aircraft on display — open for the visitors to explore. This was the first chance for many to see the inside of a military aircraft. Open for display were a P-3C Orion, an EC-121 "Super Connie," an HC-130 Hercules configured for rescue operations, an HH-3E Jolly Green Giant, an F-4C Phantom and a C-117. Much of the Fire Department's heavy fire-fighting equipment was also outside. Inside the hangar there were several displays and demonstrations — rescue equipment was exhibited; there was a fire prevention display; and Marines demonstrated rappelling techniques down the hangar wall. There was also a search and rescue demonstration and a fire fighting demonstration. Youth activities included a judo demonstration by NATO Base youngsters. You could see yourself on television with the help of a closed circuit. TV system provided by the Naval Communica- tions Station. The Naval Weather Ser- vice demonstrated that the "weather Damages cost $5,000-10,000 Between $5,000 and $10,000 in damages has been done to several houses in the Bunker Hill and 1000 series Officers' Quarters of family government housing. A project costing $206-thousand, to cover nine houses in those areas with asbestos shingle siding, and repair win- dows, has recently been completed. The new asbestos shingles are being cracked and broken because of peoples' careless- ness. "It can cost as much as $50 to re- place one shingle, and about 100 have been broken," said CECS John V. Carroll, Public Works Division Officer. "It depends on how many shingles around the broken one must be removed and if the wall under the shingle has to be resealed; then you have to consider the labor costs," he explained. The new siding is being put on the buildings to improve insulation and to beautify the homes. There has been a 33 percent reduction in the cost of heating since the shingles have been put on. "We anticipate that all of the houses in Bunker Hill and the 1000 series will THE MIDNIGHT SUNDOWNERS swing their patners and do-si-do. The square dancing demonstration was one of the many kinds of entertainment performed for the visi- tors at the NATO Base Community Day. guessing" process is a highly scientific occupation. Some of the other NATO Base activities having displays inside the hangar were the Naval Station Human Re- lations Department and Patrol Squadron Five. Live entertainment was provided all afternoon by various NATO Base groups. The Midnight Sundowners brought music and square dancing to the afternoon's festivities. Banjo and piano music was provided by Bob Weekly and Jeff ,Bovee in a Bicentennial salute to America. 'CECS CARROLL points out one of the many damaged asbestos shingles. They may cost as much as $10,000 to replace. eventually have the asbestos siding, Senior Chief Carroll said. The new shingles have not been broken because of intentional vandalism, but through carelessness. The shingles will break if a ball is Ibounced hard against the wall of the house. "If parents will show a little more concern about where and how their children play, it would keep repair costs down and give the Pub- lic Works Department more time to spend on new projects," the senior chief said. NAVSTA changes leave policy Effective June 1 Naval Station Per- sonnel going on leave will no longer be required"physically to check in/out with Security when going or returing from leave. Leave papers will be picked up from NAVSTA Personnel Office from 8 a.m. 11:30 a.m. and 1-3:30 p.m. Mon-Fri.' on the day leave is to commence. Personnel going on leave during the weekend or on a holiday. If leave pa- pers are not picked up prior to 5 p.m., form Military Personnel, they will be available form Classified Files, (Bldg. "752, Ext. 7424/7883).— Upon commencement of leave, contact Classified Files at extension 7424/7883, giving your name, rate,social security number and the numbers of days leave you are going on. Log in the time and date and name of the person you spoke to in blocks 23 and 24 of your leave papers. Upon return from leave, contact Classified Files and log the time,'date, and name of the person you spoke to in blocks 27 and 28 turn the leave pa- pers in to Naval Station Military Per- sonnel the first working day after your return from" leave. Failure tp turn.in your leave papers may result in the en- tire authorized leave period being char- ged against you. Overcast skies did not dampen the spirits of the guests as they moved out- side the hangar to watch a fly-by pro- vided by four F-4C Phantoms and two T-33 Jet Trainers. Snacks and beverages were available in numerous booths in Hangar 885. The NATO Base Community Day gave American and Icelandic friends a chance to gather together and to better under- stand each other and the mission of the Defense Force. MARINES RAPPEL down the wall of Hangar 885. The Marines also had displays and demonstrations of search and rescue equipment. June—longer and warmer days June brings the summer solstice and and an end to the spring transition. The major storm track now passes to the southeast of Iceland. The most unusual feature for June is the lack of dark- ness. The longest day of the year oc- curs this month with approximately 21 hours of daylight and 3 hours of twi- light. The average temperature for June is 48.4°F (9.1°C) ; 4.9°F (1.7°C) warmer than May. Prevailing winds come from three predominant quadrants: The south- east quadrant 30.2% of the time, the northeast quadrant 24.9% of the time and the southwest quadrant 22.7% of the time. Winds from these quadrants have a mean speed of 11 knots. The peak gust ver recorded for June was from the south-west at 54 knots in 1962. ' Chill Index I is the norm, but Chill Index II does occasionally occur. Rain and/or drizzle can be expected to occur on 65.6% of the days with snow- fall being rare. Cloudiness increases to an average of 80% of the sky being co- vered with clouds and overcast condi- tions prevailing 51.8% of the time. Fog can be expected to occur on 31.3% of the days. The sun will rise on June 1st at 3:28 a.m. and set at 11:30 a.m. for a total of 20 hours and 2 minutes of day- light. This represents a total gain of 48 minutes of daylight. The longest days of the year occur form the 18th of June through the 23th of June"with a to- tal of 21 hours and 1 minute of day- light . AF takes another step to integrate women The Directorate of Women in the Air Force will begin to phase out its res- ponsibility and will be absorbed by the Special Assistant for Equal Opportunity for Women, under the Deputy Director, Human Resources Development, Person- nel plans at Air Force headquarters. This office will continue to func- tion as special advisor on women's mat? ters to the Air Force Deputy Chief of Staff for Personnel In making the announcement, Lt. Gen. Kenneth L. Tallmen, Deputy Chief of Staff, Personnel, said, "Procurement and utilization of military women have changed dramatically in the past ' few years. The numbers of women entering the Air Force has increased signiFicant- ly since 1972 and they contribute di- rectly to the accomplishment of the Air Force mission. "We no longer view women in the mil- itary as merely providing a nucleus for force expansion during a crisis. They work alongside of men, performing in almost every job. Conequently, we .no longer consider women a separate ret- source. "Virtually all barriers to full ca- reer advancement have been eliminated, and a number of new utilization pro- grams involving wome are being imple- mented. Women will enter the Air Force Academy this fall. In the near future, they will enter a test program for un- dergraduate flying training and one to determine their suitability for security specialist assignments in the Security Police career field," he said. General Tallman explained that the special assistant will be responsible for coordinating and tracking current plans to enhance career opportunity for military women, while the actual pro- grams will be handled by the appropriate Air Staff agencies, the special assis- tant will work with action officers at Air Force headquarters and in the field to insure a smooth implementation of these programs. "The Air Force has mad* graat strides in insuring that women are an integral part of the total fere*. Our reorgan- ization represents one more step in thkt direction," General Tallstan concluded.

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The White Falcon

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