The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 11.06.1976, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 11.06.1976, Blaðsíða 1
>( White Falcon Volume XXXII Numer 23 Davis named Flight Surgeon of the Year Former Ait Force Captain (Dr.) Chris Davis, former flight surgeon of the 57th Fighter Interceptor .Squadron, Air Forces Iceland, was presented the Malcom C. Grow Award as the Air Force Flight Sur- 9M of the Year. Dr. Davis is now the >^^H of the Emergency Department at ) Jrons Hopkins University Hospital. Ceremonies took place during a meet- ing of the Society of Air Force Flight Surgeons in Washington, D.C. Lieutenant General George E. Schafer, Air Force surgeon general made the presenataion. The award is named for Major General Malcom C. Grow, first Air Force surgeon . general. It is presented annually to the Air Force flight surgeon or medical of- ficer wh'p has made the greatest contri- bution to the organization during the preceding calendar year. Dr. Davis has improved the medical capabilities at Hofn by instructing an aggressive training program for medical technicians assigned there. He has worked with Det. 14 Air Rescue and Re- covery in support of rescue missions. He also provided medical support to'other Air Force units in Iceland as well as dependent care. His professionalism, deep concern and compassion have earned Dr. Davis praise from everyone. He received his medical training from George Washington University School of Medicine. Before attending there, he —?.ceived a degree in biophysics from the .issachusetis Institute of Technology. USO show to open on base tomorrow A USO Show, "Sound Judgment," from Duke University will arrive in Keflavik today. The taur consists of three women and seven men who sing, dance and plav musical instruments like guitar and trumpet. The group, arriving from entertaining In Germany, will perform approximately 70 minutes of Top 40 rock music. Tomorrow Sound Judgment will be at the Naval Station Dispensary to play for patients only. At 9 p.m., there will be a performance for the general public at Andrews Theater. On Sunday Sound Judgment will go to the H-3 receiver site in Hofn. They will return by Sunday evening for a per- formance at the USO Center at 8:30 p.m. The group's last performance on the f!AT0 Base is on Monday in the Enlisted Dining Facility. They will play from about 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. They go to Rockville for a 9 p.m. performance. Sound Judgement will be at Grindivik on Tuesday at 9 p.m. Navy Wives' tour planned this month Naval Station Keflavik will conduct an orientation tour and briefing for all Navy wives on June 22. The tour will assemble at 9 a.m. at the Top of the Rock Club for a welcome and opening brief by Captain John R. Farrell, Naval Station commanding of- ficer. Participants will be taken by bus to visit a number of Navy and Air Force squadrons and facilities for an on-site demonstration of the mission and responsibilities of each unit. The orientation day will conclude be- fore 3:30 p.m. and includes a luncheon at the Top of the Rock. Babysitting services will be pro- vided free of charge at the Base Nursery and the Youth Center will open at 8:30 a.m. to provide for children ages 7 and older. Call 7442, 7820 or 7334 by June 18 to make your reservations. Please indicate the number and ages of children who will be cared for. For additional informa- tion, call the Human Relations Center. Make your plans now to attend and. learn the military role in Iceland. Keflavik, Iceland June II, 1976 INTERNATIONAL flags fly at the scout jamboree. (See Page 3 for story and photos.) DOD changes EO policy Secretary of Defense Donald Rums- feld today siened a revised Department of Defense directive designed to strenghten equal opportunity ]programs and policies affecting military and civ- ilian personnel. At the signing of DOD directive 1100 .15, "The Department of Defense Equal Opportunity Program," Secretary Rums- feld emphasized that "it is the objec- tive of the Department of Defense to eliminate discimination based on race, color, religion, sax, age, or national origin." He pointed out that the revised di- rective broadens the scope of the de- partment's equal opportunity program to embrace all DOD programs and activities, and not just those addressed to equal employment opportunity. He said: "It is another indication of our efforts to e- radicate any acts of discrimination throughout the Department of Defense," For the first time, the directive requires an annual report by the mil- itary departments and defense agencies to the secretary of defense demonstrat- ing progress in achieving the goals of the affirmative action plans. In addition, the directive reempha- sizes that it is Department of Defense policy to: —Require DOD contractors to comply with the policy of equal opportunity. —Ensure that all on-base activities, and any off-base activities offered or otherwise made available to DOD person- nel are open, as appropriate, to all DOD personnel regardless of race, color, religion, aex, age, or national origin. —Oppose discrimination in off-base housing directed against any DOD per- sonnel. Impose, as required, the off-limits sanction in cases of discrimination in- volving places of public accommodation outside military installations. The directive encourages the chain o£ command to promote, support, and enforce the DOD equal opportunity program. It notes, "The chain of command shall b« continously emphasized as the primary channel for correcting < discriminatory practices and for communication of race relations and equal opportunity mat- ters." Babel NavFac Sailor of '76 Builder First Class Gary E. Babel, Naval Facility, was selected Commander Oceanographic System Atlantic, and com- peted for Commander in Chief Atlantic Fleet "Shore Duty Saiior of the Year." Chosen from among four outstanding candidates, BUI Babel received this honor, based on his "exceptional ability and value to the Oceanographic System and the Navy." Master Chief Petty Officer of the At- lantic Fleet G. P. Gray congratulated Babel in a letter: "I wish to take this opportunity to personally commend you for your recent selection to represent your type command in the Sailors of the Year program. Your performance at CINCLANFLT Head- quarters and your outstanding military achievements, extracurricular activities and general character were most out- standing. Your accomplishments which resulted in this honor reflect most favorably upon yourself, your family and the United States Navy." Babel formerly instructed in indus- trial shops at the Portsmouth, N. H., Naval Prison. In this capacity BUI Babel worked in training and rehabilita- tion programs. A 10-year Navy veteran, Babel has been stationed at NAVFAC for 20 months, and acts as second vice-president of the Fleet Reserve Association. For the past 15 years, he has assist- ed in Boy Scouts. He has served as assistant Scoutmaster for Troop 17, Queen's Council, N. Y. Babel attended Mexico State Univer- sity, Las Cruces, Mexico, and has taken 18 credits from the University of Mary- land during his tour at Keflavik. He wants to major in business administra- tion. In his off-duty time Babel enjoys playing Softball and racquetball. Concerning his selection, he comment- ed, "It was a great honor, of course, and I was proud to represent the Naval Facility, Keflavik, Iceland and the Oceanographic System Atlantic and it was a great experience. My tour here in Iceland has been enhanced," he added. Babel and his wife, Teberruz, have two daughters, Teberruz, four, and the other daughter is Zarafet, two. Iceland celebrates Independence Day Iceland's version of the 4th of July is Thursday. This year, the nation is celebrating the 32nd anniversary of the establishment of the Icelandic Republic liith festivities lasting all day and ranging from coast to coast. While ev- ery community in the country will be holding its own local observance, the day's festivities in Reykjavik are the the most elaborate. In general, the celebration will be- gin in the morning, with a special mass at the National Cathedral, next to the House of Parliament. The President of Iceland then places a wreath on the sta- tue of Jon Sigurdsson, 19th century leader of Iceland's struggle foi full independence, whose birthday was sel- ected as the birthday of the republic itself. A woman dressed in the elaborate, gold-trimmed national costume appears as the Mountain Woman, a traditional sym- bol of Iceland, incorporating the con- cepts of the mother country, determin- ation and cultural achievement. Music is provided by the Reykjavik brass bands, aad an honor guard consists of police and Scout troops. In the afternoon, the focus moves to to the Laugadalur Sports Field, near the large outdoor swimming pool, where var- ious children's entertainments'and ath- letic contests are staged. In the evening, the celebration car- ries on with dancing under the skies in various schoolyards scattered throughout Reykjavik. Different types of bands and music are featured at the different lo- cations, intended to provide something for everyone. If you don't feel like going into Reykjavik, Keflavik celebrates too, cen- tering activities around the city park. But wherever you go, try to get out next Thursday and help our Icelandic friends celebrate their independence day. Navy Relief Society drive ends soon The annual drive for contributions to the Navy Relief Society ends Thursday. Navy Relief has been giving as- sistance to families since 1904. Your contributions are needed so that help can continue. There are Navy Relief representa- tives in these Navy and Marine NATO Base commands— COMFAIRKEF, EOD, IDF, Marine Barracks, NAVFAC, NAV- COMMSTA, NAVSTA, NSGA, NWSED AND ROICC. Simply give your contribution to the Navy Relief representative in your department or division. No government funds are received by the society; its funds come from annual drives like this one and in- vestments made in America's indus- tries. The amount of financial assistance given to service members and their families varies from year to year, but it has been growing steadily over the years until it is a multi-million dollar program. The Navy Relief Society's primary method of giving assistance is finan- cial and may be— * -a loan without interest to be repaid over a period of time, or * -a grant of funds with no repay- ment , or * -a combination of the two meth- ods depending on the indi- vidual's circumstances. The Navy Relief Society was in- corporated in Wasington, D.C. with a charter to aid widows and orphans of the Navy and Marine Corps. Later this assistance was widened to in- clude members of the Navy and Marine Corps on active duty and their depen- dents and retired members of the Navy and Marine Corps and their depen- dents;_______________________________

x

The White Falcon

Beinir tenglar

Ef þú vilt tengja á þennan titil, vinsamlegast notaðu þessa tengla:

Tengja á þennan titil: The White Falcon
https://timarit.is/publication/382

Tengja á þetta tölublað:

Tengja á þessa síðu:

Tengja á þessa grein:

Vinsamlegast ekki tengja beint á myndir eða PDF skjöl á Tímarit.is þar sem slíkar slóðir geta breyst án fyrirvara. Notið slóðirnar hér fyrir ofan til að tengja á vefinn.