The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 23.07.1976, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 23.07.1976, Blaðsíða 1
White Falcon Volume XXXII Number 29 Keflavik, Iceland July 23, 1976 GETTING "TICKETS," Private Pilot Licenses, that is, are ADR1 Bill Renica (left) and TSgt. Gayle Florence (center right). Issuing the tickets is FAA Inspector Lee Brooks as instructor Chaplain (Capt.) Dick Higgins looks on. NASA seeks new Astronauts The Department of Defense is support- ing the National Aeronautics. Space Ad- ministration (NASA) in plans to recruit additional astronauts. The added per- sonnel are needed to serve as flight crew members of the space shuttle. Scheduled to begin this summer, the program will be coordinated by the Air Force. It will assist NASA in assuring that members of all the armed forces who may qualify as astronauts are made aware of the NASA recruitment, and that DoD- wide coordination of the program is af- fected. NASA's planning calls for civilian and military selections with qualified minorities and women among the newly selected astronaut candidates. There- fore, minority and women candidates are encouraged to apply. Screening, evalua- tion and physical examination of appli- cants are planned for 1977 with the se- lection of candidates expected late next year. Candidates will be assigned to NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston for a two-year evaluation period; new astro- nauts will be selected from this group in mid-1980. All armed forces staffs are develop- ing procedures to insure full participa- tion throughout the Defense Department. With this recruitment, competition will be opened for two space shuttle flight- crew positions; pilot and mission spe- cialist. Pilots will operate the space shuttle as it is launched into earth orbit, fly missions of up to 30 days and then re- turn to earth and land on a runway in a manner similar to airplanes. Mission specialists will have the overall res- ponsibility for the coordination of shuttle operations. The mission spe- cialist may participate in extravehicu- lar activity, space walk, and the de- ployment and retrieval of satellites. Full details including qualification requirements and methods for application and processing will be disseminated throughout the Defense Department later this summer. Navy to decommission three WW II destroyers The Navy announced recently the de- commissioning of three more destroyers of World War II vintage. The average age of the ships is more than 30 years, the Navy said. The ships decommissioned were the USS New, DD-818; USS Richard E. Kraus, DD-849; and USS Stribling, DD-867. All were assigned to the U. S. Atlantic Fleet, and were recently found to be unfit for further Naval service by a Navy Board of Inspection and Survey. The approximately 800 officer and men assigned to the crews of the three ships will be reassigned. The decommissioning of these three ships leaves the Navy with a total of 473 ships on the active duty roster. Two get flying check Two members of the Keflavik Aero Club, ADR1 Bill Renica, of the Naval Station Organizational Maintenance De- partment, Power Plants Division, and Technical Sergeant Gayle Florence, of the 57th Fighter Interceptor Squadron LGMA Department, Air Forces Iceland, received their Private Pilot ' ..Licenses Friday. In order to become a Licensed Private Pilot, a person must have at least 40 hours flying time (ADR1 Renica had 90 hours and TSgt. Florence had 60 hours). Half of those minumun 40 hours must be solo and half dual-flying with an in- structor. The two men had to pass a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) written test with questions on such things as aerodynamics, safety, navigation, FAA regulations and weather and finally the student pilots had to pass a Flight Ex- amination administered by a FAA Inspec- tor. "The examination involves flight training maneuvers such as stalls, take - offs, landings, cross country navigation and radio communication," explained Lee Brooks, the FAA Inspector headquartered in Frankfurt, Germany. "Flying gives me personal satisfac- tion in doing something different," com- mented TSgt. Florence. "I have wanted to get my license for years. Although I feel tranquil and relaxed when I fly, I realize that I must be alert because it can mean my life." "I have been involved in aviation since I was 13 years-old and I guess it was instinctive to want my Pilot's License," POl Renica said. "Flying is very relaxing—it seems like you leave all your problems on the ground. Flying gives me solitude." The Keflavik Aero Club gave ADR1 Renica and TSgt. Florence the oppor- tunity to get their Pilots' "Tickets." The club owns a Piper Warrior plane that can be rented by club members for in- struction and recreation flying. The club has two FAA Licensed Flying Instructors—Gerry Newman, who works for the Keflavik Airport Fire Department and Air Force Chaplain (Captain) Dick Higgins. "I commend the members of the Keflavik Aero Club who are learning to fly for their enthusiasm," FAA Inspector Brooks remarked, "and my heart goes out to them because of the weather condi- tions they contend with. I suppose it does have one advantage—they learn to handle winds better than many student pilots." "I knew the day I was going to solo the first time," said the sergeant, "and all the way to the hangar I kept saying to myself 'I don't have to go through with it.' Later, the instructor said 'It's up to you,' gave me some last- minute tips and got out of the plane. I remember sitting there deciding whether to back-out. I had to force myself to take off. Once I was in the air, every- thing was fine. When I landed that last time, I knew I had really accomplished something," he remarked. "I have been working on my license since 1965. I started taking lessons in Guam and logged a few more hours at NAS Patuxent River, Md.," explained ADR1 Renica. "It was great to finally get my pilot's ticket. Aero Clubs are non-profit organic zations found on many Navy bases. The Keflavik club meets once a month in the Air Operations Building (810). The Aero Club club-house is on the second floor in Hangar 885. The club secretary is available for information at extension 6154 from noon to 5 p.m. on Tuesdays and Fridays. There are about 40 members in the club now, about half of whom are learning to fly. To join the club, you simply submit your application with a $25 initiation fee. The application is voted on by a board of five club officers. (Once the initiation fee has been paid, it need not be paid again if the member can produce certification that he is a "member in good standing" when he joins an Aero Club at another base.) The club dues are $10 a month and the plane costs $14 an hour and, for student pilots, an additional $8 for an instructor. VP-5 takes man to medical aid A 19-year-old Icelandic man was flown to Copenhagen in a Patrol Squadron P3C Aircraft Monday night for a kidney transplant. The Defense Force Rescue Coordinating Center received the request late Monday night to airlift Hafsteinn Arnason a resident of Kopavogur. The man needed to be in Copenhagen by 7 a.m. Tuesday for the operation. The Patrol Squadron Five Aircraft, piloted by Lieutenant Gene Williams and with a crew of five, left Keflavik air- port at 2 a.m. Tuesday— arriving in Copenhagen four hours later. Arnason walked off the plane into an awaiting ambulance. There is no word yet on the outcome of the operation. 4,000 AF NCOs to be promoted in Aug. The Air Force Military Personnel Cen- ter has just released the August 1 in- cremental promotion figures for E-5s through E-9s, and it will result in more than 4,000 Air Force NCOs gaining an- other stripe in less than two weeks. Chief master sergeant selectees from the FY 77 selection list may sew on their new chevrons if they have a se- quence number from 0001 through 101. New senior master sergeants will •be chosen for upgrading August 1 providing their FY 76 line numbers are from 2998 through 3292. These new E-8s will have a date of rank retroactive to July 1, 1976. Tech sergeants from the FY 76A selec- tion list will join the top three en- listed structure if they have a promo- tion sequence number from 0001 through 902. All remaining E-5s on the FY 76B selection list will be sewing on their second rocker August 1. The new tech sergeants will have a retroactive date of rank of July 1, 1976. E-4s from the FY 77A5 selection list will join the staff NCO ranks if they have a line number from 939 through 2386. Marine NCO Board in session for top 4 ranks NATO BASE PERSONNEL enjoy the new sounds of Dark Star during an outdoor rock con- cert Sunday. Rock fans couldn't resist the warm, sunny weather and the chance to stretch out on the green lawn between Barracks 750 and 753. The concert was so successful that more will be planned for the future. (photo by J01 Jim Miller) The board to select Marines for the top four enlisted ranks convened at Headquarters Marine Corps July 13. The committee is authorized to select 1,380 Marines for the four ranks which are within the E-6 and E-9 pay grades. The makeup" of the various zones for each rank is in Marine Corps Bulletin 1430 of April 23. The bulletin includes promotion information and a list of el- igible Marines within each military oc- cupation specialty. The board also will determine which Marines may be per- forming below the standards of their grade. This year, the selections to sergeants major and first sergeants vill more than double,those last year. There will also be an increase in the selec- tions to master gunnery sergeant and master sergeant. 170 sergeants major will be selected: 280 will be picked for master gunnery sergeant: 355 to first sergeant and 721 to master serge- ant. The board, which is headed by Colonel James E. Clark, is expected to be in session for approximately eight and one- half weeks.

x

The White Falcon

Beinir tenglar

Ef þú vilt tengja á þennan titil, vinsamlegast notaðu þessa tengla:

Tengja á þennan titil: The White Falcon
https://timarit.is/publication/382

Tengja á þetta tölublað:

Tengja á þessa síðu:

Tengja á þessa grein:

Vinsamlegast ekki tengja beint á myndir eða PDF skjöl á Tímarit.is þar sem slíkar slóðir geta breyst án fyrirvara. Notið slóðirnar hér fyrir ofan til að tengja á vefinn.