The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 06.08.1976, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 06.08.1976, Blaðsíða 1
White Falcon Volume XXXII Number 31 Keflavik, Iceland August 6, 1976 « COMMSTA's CO awarded Legion of Merit During his recent trip to Washington, D.C., Captain Ralph Spaulding, command- ing officer of the Naval Communication Station, received the Legion of Merit from Admiral Shick, dommander Naval Telecommunications Command. The award was for service performed from August 1973 to November 1975, when Capt. Spaulding was assigned to the organization of the Joint Chiefs of Staff as the chief of the National Mili- tary Cpmmand Systems Branch. His re- sponsibilities encompassed all improve- ments to the National Military Command Center (NMCC) and the Alternate National Military Command Center in the areas of facilities, displays, secure and non- secure telephone/audio/television com- munications and computer system inter- faces. Capt. Spaulding's citation read in part: "...(His) accomplishments re- sulted in significant improvements to the system provided the President and the Secretary of Defense for the command and control of military forces of the United States." The most notable of the accomplish- ments for which he was cited was the design and implementation of the new NMCC which was formally opened in the Pentagon last February. Special plow lays 60,000* CCTV cable Work has begun on laying approximate- ly 60,000 feet of cable on the NATO Base for a closed circuit television (CCTV) system expected to be operational this fall. This coaxial cable, being buried 12 to 18 inches deep, is a strong, light- weight cable protected by a spiral steel covering. One of the most important pieces of equipment being used to install the cable is the Vibratory Cable Plow. It's a large, white, machine with an over- hanging nose. It is designed to install as many as six cables or up to three feet of plastic pipe a maximum of 48 ^nches deep with one pass of the plow lade. A special blade has been pro- vided with this leased equipment for Iceland where many rocks are encounter- ed. There was concern at first whether the labor-saving plow could contend with the numerous rocks. this was overcome by first "pre-ripping" the slot and removing any surface boulders, then re- plowing over the sane route with the cable inserted. WITH THE COMING OF AUGUST, the summer has almost ended and little time remains to get off the NATO Base and explore some of the beautiful Icelandic countryside in Warm weather. This picture of a river in the valley of Thingvellir is only one example of the beauty that can be enjoyed. (photo by PHC Paul Schlappich) AF NCO specialties to retrain The Air Force has announced a new program called "Palace Balance." The program.will solicit noncommissioned of- ficers (NCOs) in grades E-6 through 9 to' voluntarily retrain from specialties overmanned in their grade. Personnel will be contacted by per- sonal letter from the "Palace Balance" team at Air Force Military Personnel Center (AFMPC). They will be offered several possible shortage Air Force specialty codes for which they are po- tentially qualified for retraining. The "Palace Balance" team will also assist the NCOs in finding requirements and lo- cations where they can be used in the retraining skill. "Palace Balance" is designed to keep in contact with NCOs in overage skills and smooth their retraining. Team members will not only try to place the NCO in a career field of his choosing but will also offer assignment to a base of choice that has a require- ment of the retraining skill. An additional incentive to retrain is also available for volunteers in the form of permanent change-of-station (PCS) deferment of 24 months either at their current base or at the new base if a PCS is involved in the retraining. NCOs in overage skills will also help their careers by moving from crowded", surplus skills to the challenge of a supervisory position in the new special- ty. Emphasis placed on a highly person- alized approach distinguishes the "Pal- ace Balance" program from traditional voluntary retraining. A personal letter to each identified HC0 includes an in- vitation to retrain. It will explain the reasons retraining is necessary and list up to five shortage specialties the THE VIBRATORY CABLE PLOW has been brought to Iceland to install cable on the NATO Base for the CCTV system expected to be operational this fall. addressee is most qualified to enter. NCOs receiving the letter may also i se- lect other shortage AFSCs in the re- training in which they qualify. Direct mail or telephone will be en- couraged. The team will field ques- tions, guide, counsel and assist indi- vidual NCOs on all points of the pro- gram. Grade imbalances, according to AFMPC spokesmen, are one ot the most serious problems facing Air Force personnel man- agers today. They lead to lack of supervision in some fields, under-use of senior NCOs in others. It's serious enough for the "Palace Balance" team to devote full attention to the problem and offer incentives—an assignment prefer- ence and stability —to make the AFSC switch more attractive. Registration for NCFA Term I to begin Registration for Term I classes being otfered by the University of Maryland (,UM; and Los Angeles Community College (LACC) begins Monday at the Navy Campus for Achievement Office (NCFA), building 752. The NCFA Office will be open for registration from 8 a.m. to noon and 1 to 5 p.m. until August 20. Term I clas- ses begin August 23 and end October 15. They meet from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. at the A.T. Mahan High School Monday through Friday. Tuition Aid and Veterans' Benefit money is available to help pay the cost of classes. It can be requested at the NCFA Office during registration. The UM is offering seven classes this term. They are: Business Enterprise, Management and Organization Theory, Western Civilization, Diplomatic History of the United States, Intro to Math— combined with Refresher Math, Dynamics of Sooial Interaction and Elementary Icelandic. LACC has 12 classes scheduled for Term I. They are: Legal Aspects of Evi- dence, Introductory Accounting I, Tune- up and Carburetion Principles, Aero- nautical Ground School, Principles of Business Data Processing, Computer Logic and Arithmetic, Mathematics of Electron- ics I, Personal Finance and Invest- ments, Collecting and Writing Naws, Beginning Photography, Real Estate Prin- ciples and Oral Communication. LACC is also offering Principles of Finance and Accounting I at Rockville. Students from the NATO Base can attend the Rockville classes but they nust pro- vide their own transportation. For more information on classes or registration, contact the NCFA Office at extention 7795 or 6226. Det. 14 evacuates premature infant The Air Forces' Det. 14 performed another of its many medical rescue mis- sions Friday night. The HH-3E Jolly Green Giant Rescue Helicopter flew to Akranes to take a premature baby to the Reykjavik Hospital. Less than 20 minutes after they had received the call from the Icelandic Lifesaving Association, the helicopter was airborne with First Lieutenant George Tota as the pilot, Captain Rick Foley as the co-pilot, the Flight Mech- naic was Technical Sergeant Ken Jones and the Pararescueman was Technical Ser- geant Rick Garley. Navy Lieutenant (Dr.) Tom Thompson and Lieutenant Evelyn Davis, Navy Nurse Corps, were also on the flight with the Naval Station Dis- pensary's portable incubator. The three-month premature Gardarsson baby was picked up in Akranes after the Jolly Green Giant had picked up the Ice- landic physician who had first alerted the Lifesaving Association. The helicopter was met at the Reykja- vik Airport by an ambulance and the baby was at the hospital at 9:56 p.m., less than one hour after the Icelandic doctor first called the Icelandic Lifesaving Association. Military medicine students start school this fall The Uniformed Services university of the Health Sciences will enroll its first class of medical students this fall. The university has been officially notified by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education that provisional aca- demic accreditation has been granted to the medical school's education program. Thirty-two students have been condi- tionally accepted to the school. The students are currently undergoing pre- commissioning physical examinations. More than 1,700 applications were re- ceived from prospective entrants. On Oct. 12, military orientation ses- sions will begin. During the following four weeks, students will be instructed on specific aspects of military medi- cine. Medical school classes will begin Nov. 15 at the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, located at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington. The university will move into its permanent facilities on the campus of the National Naval Medical Center, Bethesda, Md., by the time the second class is enrolled in 1977. University officials say persons ap- plying to the medical school must take the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT). Those applying for the class to enter in September 1977, who have not taken the MCAT within the past three years must do so this fall. The 1976 MCAT application cutoff date is Aug. 30 for those testing abroad and Sept. 3 for all others. Military applicants, including Re- serve Officers Training Corps and serv- ice academy personnel, must obtain writ- ten approval from their service to apply to the medical school. Additional in- formation on the school may be obtained from the Director of Admissions, Uni- versity of the Health Sciences, 6917 Ar- lington Road, Bethesda, Md. 20014.

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