The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 20.08.1976, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 20.08.1976, Blaðsíða 1
i White Falcon Volume XXXII Number 33 Critically injured man medevaced ±y Det. 14 helo. ^^The HH-3E Jolly Green Giant rescue helicopter of Air Force Det.14, 39 ARRWG medevaced a critically injured Icelandic man from Akranes to the Reykjavik Hospital Friday. Thorstein Benjaminsson was involved in an automobile accident at Svinadal- lur, near Akranes. He was taken to Akranes and examined. His leg was broken in two palces, he had a number of open wounds and a severe loss of blood. The Icelandic Lifesaving Association requested Det. 14's aid at 9:22 p.m. and the Jolly Green Giant was airborne at 10:05 p.m. The aircraft commander was Lieutenant Colonel Al Fechser, the co-pilot was First Lieutenant George Tota, Navy Lieu- tenant (Dr.) Charles Tate was the flight surgeon. The Flight Mechanic was Ser- geant Clint Solt and the Pararescueman was Airman 1st Class Andy Moser. The injured man was picked up, taken to the Reykjavik Airport and on his way to the hospital by ambulance by 10:40 p.m. Keflavik, Iceland August 20, 1976 OTSN DAVID BEAUCHEMIN indicates the spot where he jumped into the icy 46° water in Keflavik harbor to save the lives of two Icelandic children. 'A family image of good neighbors' by JOCS James A. Johnston When Rear Admiral Harold G. Rich as- sumed duty as Commander, Iceland Defense Force in May 1974, the NATO Base, and indeed, the fate of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization's status in Iceland, were in a state of upheaval amid re- negotiation of the Memorandum of Under- standing between Iceland and the United States. Renegotiation continued through Sep- tember, when points of conflict were mutually resolved. "The agreement was quite satisfact- ory," RAdm Rich recalls. "Changes in the Memorandum of Understanding removed some of the controversies. Our new housing construction, reduction in per- sonnel and other points are all on track now: plans have been implemented and programs have been established." Adm. Rich said mutual cooperation and Kespect have been rebuilt since the Oct- Jer 1974 signing of the MOU. The De- fense Force, he said, working through the U. S. Embassy, has gained the trust and confidence of the host nation. "The NATO Base will always be a sens- itive political issue in Iceland," the Admiral said, "probably as long as the need for a defense force exists. We must minimize the sensitivity." The Admiral said Defense Force mem- bers can help minimize the sensitivity by the image each individual projects. •'What kind of guests are we?" he ask- ed. "We are guests in Iceland, and we must project the total family image of good neighbors and guests." Adm. Rich compared the Defense Force presence in Iceland to guests in a fam- ily home. There are those who are exem- plary guests and are welcomed back, and those who are not welcome. "I am proud of our results," the Ad- miral offered. "During difficult times and under trying circumstances, members of the Iceland Defense Force have con- ducted themselves in an exemplary man- ner. I am grateful for the understand- ing and support of every member of our community. He attributes much of the success to base leadership at all levels, but par- ticularly at the middle management level. "The reason for our success is com- Story continues on Page 4 Quick action prevent* drowning Sailor saves children by J02 Terry Barnthouse A NATO Base Navyman was responsible for saving the lives of two Icelandic children after they fell from a fishing pier in Keflavik Sunday morning. Ocean Systems Technician Seaman David Beauchemin and his wife Beverly were fishing at the pier when they noticed some children playing near them. Beau- chemin explained, "I saw these two kids playing and as one fell, the other tripped over him, and both fell over the side of the pier." Without hesitation, Seaman Beauchemin took off his coat and dove 10 feet into the water. He said, passout the water. The of my head managed to hold "I thought I was going to moment I hit that cold kids tried to stand on top when I came up. Somehow I their heads above the water. All I could think of was survi- val. I imagined them being saved, but not me." What seemed like an eternity was only 10 minutes for the 20-year-old Beauche- min to stay afloat with the struggling children before help arrived. His wife ran for help and a couple of Danish fishermen from a ship in the area helped pull the three from the water with a long pole. One of the children received mouth- to-mouth resuscitation from a Danish sailor. The Icelandic Police took the two THE FUTURE Commander of the Iceland De- fense Force, RAdm. Karl J. Bernstein. RAdm. Bernstein to become IDF commander RADM. HAROLD G. RICH, Iceland Defense Force. commander of the Rear Admiral Karl J. Bernstein will succeed Rear Admiral Harold G. Rich as Commander of the Iceland Defense Force in change of command ceremonies at the NATO Base on Tuesday, August 24. The afternoon event will be located in Hangar 831. Formation will be assem- bled at 2:30 p.m. Guests speakers will be Mr. Doyle Martin, Charge d'Affaires ad interim, American Embassy, Reykjavik, and Vice Admiral Howard E. Greer, USN, Commander Naval Air Force, U.S. Atlantic Fleet. Prior to assuming command of Iceland Defense Force, Rear Admiral Bernstein commanded Naval Air Station, Jackson- ville, Fla., from August until July 1976. The native of Nova Scotia was born on March 31, 1925. After attending St. Re- gis School in New York City, he enlisted in the U. S. Navy in March 1942. Fol- lowing duty in the Mediterranean he en- tered the U. S. Naval Academy in June 1945. Upon graduation he reported for flight training at Pensacola, Fla., and was designated a Naval Aviator in July 1952. Rear Admiral Bernstein has served with Patrol Squadron 34 in Trinidad, British West Indies and on the staff of Commander Fleet Air Wing Eleven, Nor- folk, Va. After a tour with Pa- trol Squadron 8 he was a Naval Liaison Officer to the Royal Canadian Air Force. This will not be the first time the new Admiral has been stationed in Ice- land. He commanded Patrol Squadron 10 for six months, during which time it was deployed to Keflavik. He has also commanded Patrol Squadron 31 and served with Allied Forces South- ern Europe. In addition to the Naval Academy, Rear Admiral Bernstein is a graduate of the Naval War College and the NATO De- fense College, Rome, Italy. He is married to the former Jean Eli- zabeth Schulze of Alexandria,. Va. They have four children, Mark, Brian, Courtney, and Amanda. children, Villjalnur Fannar, age 6, and Agnar Magnasson, age 7, to the Keflavik Hospital and Beauchemin to the Base Dis- pensary for treatment. All were re- ported in good condition and were re- turned to their homes. The cold, shivering Beauchemin was treated for exposure at the Dispensary by HM3 John Bennett. He was first wrapped in blankets and rubbed to revive circulation, then he was given a warm shower. "It felt GREAT," said Beauchemin, who stayed in the shower for half an hour. Says the courageous Beauchemin, "It's the first time anything like this has ever happened to me and I hope it never happens again." While folding a few wet dollar bills into a dry pocket, he remarked, "The only thing I lost was my glasses, do you know of a scuba diver who could get them for me?" His wife added, "Luckily, we just bought an extra pair last week." When asked how many fish they had caught that day, Beverly replied, "We had just caught our 20th fish and were just about ready to leave the pier when the accident happened. I guess it was a good fishing day for us and a lucky day for those kids." OTSN Beauchemin. a native of Chico- pee, Mass.. has been assiened to the Naval Facility for nine months. New XO to assume duties next week Commander John A. Mueller will assume duties as the Naval Station executive officer next week. Cdr. Mueller has served for the past four years as executive officer of the Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps (NROTC) unit at Villanova University, Villanova, Pa. He was commissioned in the Navy in 1956 and completed flight training at the Naval Advanced Training Command, Naval Air Station, Hutchinson, Kan. in 1958. After serving with various air squad- rons from 1958-1966, Cdr. Mueller became the first U.S. Navy officer to command a Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) squad- ron. He commanded Number 10 Squadron at RAAF Base, Townsville, Queensland from June 1968 to January 1969. Cdr. Mueller earned a bachelor of science degree at Southern Illinois University. He received an A.M. degree at Sanford University in 1964 while as- signed as the Naval Science Instructor on the NROTC staff. He also attended college in 1969. Cdr. Mueller and his wife, Mildred, have two children: Gay, 17; and John, 13. THE NEW Naval Station Executive Officer, Cdr. John A. Mueller.

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