The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 17.09.1976, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 17.09.1976, Blaðsíða 1
Stretteg profestionalUm Capt Weir assumes command of Naval Forces Iceland, NavSta Captain Jack T. Weir relieved Captain John R. Farrell as Commander Naval Forces Iceland and Naval Station Com- manding Officer Tuesday in ceremonies in Hangar 831. The Honorable James J. Blake, United States Ambassador to Iceland, was the guest speaker. Rear Admiral Karl J. Bernstein, Commander Iceland Defense Force, Introduced Ambassador Blake. Capt. Weir, who is the Naval Sta- tion's eleventh commanding officer, comes from duty in the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations where he was Head of the Plans and Programs Branch, Ocean Surveillance Division. ^ During the change of command cere- Peonies, Capt. Farrell praised naval sta- tion personnel for the "superb support" they provided him during his two year tour. He said he did not complete all the goals he had set for himself, but is proud of the accomplishments thus far. Capt. Farrell will report to the Chief of Naval Material in Washington, D. C. After assuming command, Capt. Weir praised Capt. Farrell for a "job well done" and said there still are many challenges ahead. He noted that "dynamic political, economic and social changes are at work in the world, our nation and our Navy." He said the Chief of Naval Operations is leading the way toward stabilizing the course of the future, with emphasis on fleet readiness and professionalism (continued on Page 3) CAPTAIN WEIR READS HIS ORDERS at the change of command ceremonies Tuesday. White Falcon Volume XXXII Number 37 Keflavik, Iceland September 17. 1976 NORAD, ADCOM commander in chief arrives in Kef for 3-day visit The Commander in Chief of North Amer- ican Air Defense Command (NORAD) and U.S. Air Force Defense Command (ADCOM), General Daniel "Chappie" James Jr., ar- rived yesterday for a three-day visit of the Air Force facilities in Iceland. . General James, as NORAD and ADCOM commander, has operational command of all U.S. and Canadian Strategic aero- space defense forces. He is responsible for the surveillance and air defense of North American airspace and for provid- ing warning and assessment of hostile attack on the continent from bombers and General Daniel James Jr. Officers' wives to hold international welcome ^ To welcome three prominent women to Pfeflavik, the Officers' Wives Club will sponsor an international tea at the Of- ficers' Club Tuesday from 2 to 4 p.m. Honored guests will be Mrs. Dolores Blake, wife of Ambassador James J. Blake, Mrs. Jean Bernstein, wife of Rear Admiral Karl J. Bernstein, Commander Iceland Defense worce and Mrs. Sally Weir, wife of Captain Jack T. Weir, Com- mander Naval Forces Iceland and Naval Station Commanding Officer. The afternoon will feature Turkish coffee, Japanese tea, hot chocolate and punch as well as other foreign food and beverages. According to Mrs. Justine Lionberger, Officers' Wives Club president, all mem- bers are urged to wear international costumes. missiles. Air Forces Iceland (AFI) reports di- rectly to ADCOM and provides coverage in the gap between North American airspace and European airspace. ADCOM is the United States element of NORAD. At 3:15 p.m. today General James will present the Air Force Outstanding Unit Award to Colonel William Lindeman, AFI commander, for Air Forces Iceland units involved. The general is also scheduled to be the guest speaker at the AFI "Dining Out" tonight. The Dining Out is in commemoration of the Air Forces' 29th anniversary. General James' military accomplish- ments have been numerous. He has been assigned to Aerospace Defense Command, Tactical Air Command, United States Air Forces Europe, and Pacific Air Command. He was deputy assistant Secretary of Defense (Public Affairs) from March 1970 to April 1973, and was later assigned as Vice Commander, Military Airlift Com- mand. He was promoted to general in September 1975 and moved to his present assignment. His decorations include: the Depart- ment of Defense Distinguished Service Medal, the Air Force Distinguished Serv- ice Medal with one oak leaf cluster, the Legion of Merit with one oak leaf clus- ter, the Distinguished Flying Cross with two oak leaf clusters, the Meritorious Service Medal, the Air Medal with 13 oak leaf clusters and the Army Commendation Medal. Widely known for his speeches on Americanism and patriotism, the general has been widely quoted in numerous na- tional and international publications. Excerpts from some of his speeches also have been read into the Congressional record. He was awarded the George Wash- ington Freedom Foundation Medal in 1967 and again in 1968. In 1970 General James received the Arnold der Society Eugene M. Zuckert Award for outstanding contributions to Air Force professionalism. The citation that accompanied the award read "...fighter pilot with a magnificent record, public speaker, and eloquent spokesman for the American Dream we so rarely receive. " General James was born in Pensacola, Florida on Feb. 11, 1920. After gradu- ating from Washington High School In Pensacola, he attended the Tuskegee Ins- titute, majoring in Physical Education. After receiving his bachelor's degree, he became a civilian instructor pilot in the Army Air Corps Aviation Cadet Pro- gram. In January 1943 he entered the program as a cadet and received his com- mission as a second lieutenant in July 1943. The general is scheduled to leave tomorrow afternoon. NATO base community wakes up with hijacking at its doorstep 3y JOC Jim Dewater and J01 Von Soriano Keflavik International Airport was the scene of tense drama Saturday morn- ing when five persons, sympathizers to a "Free Croatia" movement, forced a hi- jacked TWA 727 jetliner to land here. The plane landed at the Keflavik air- port at 11 a.m. and it was immediately taxied to an isolated apron where it sat for more than two hours. It departed Iceland at 1:17 p.m. The TWA aircraft was hijacked late Friday night while enroute to Chicago from New York. The hijackers forced the pilots to land at Montreal and from there, they directed New York police to a bomb planted at Grand Central Station. Police found the bomb, but when they tried to defuse it, it exploded and killed one officer and seriously wounded three others. From Montreal, the flight went to Gander, Newfoundland where it was re- fueled. At Gander, 33 of the original 92 passengers on board were released. When the hijacked plane departed Gander, it was escorted by a TWA 707 jetliner which was equipped with international trans-Atlantic navigational equipment. According to TWA spokesmen, the hi- jackers, who called themselves "Fighters for a free Croatia," demanded transpor- tation to an unconfirmed destination. Croatia is a small region of Yugoslavia. After touching down at Keflavik, a package containing "Free Croatia" leaf- lets written in French, was delivered to the TWA 707 escort plane. During its stay here, the only vehicles allowed to approach the hijacked jetliner were a refueling truck and a micro-bus carrying sandwiches and hot coffee. Military authorities at the NATO base were on hand throughout the ordeal to offer assistance to the Icelandic gov- ernment. Negotiations between the hi- jackers and international authorities were, at that time, being handled by TWA airline officials. Security personnel from the NATO base and Icelandic police were situated at various locations on the airfield and out of sight of the hijackers. When the plane left Keflavik, its flight plan destination was London, but British officials refused permission for the plane to land there. It flew to Paris and landed there at 5:03 p.m. af- ter flying over London and dropping the "Free Croatia" leaflets. Police at Paris shot out the air- craft's tires and some 1,200 officers surrounded it. One of the hijackers, a woman, was allowed to leave the plane tp negotiate with French officials but au- thorities arrested her and refused to let her return to the jetliner. A short time later her four male companions re- leased their hostages and surrendered to police. All of the freed hostages, although very tired, were unhurt and were later flown to Chicago to be reunited wj.th their families. One of the hostages was a 19-year-old Navyman enroute to the Great Lakes, 111., Naval Training Cen- ter. The five hijackers, four Yugoslavian- born men and an American woman—the wife of the hijack leader—were flown to New York to be arraigned on Federal charges. The bombs worn by the hijackers were discovered to be fake and minutes before they surrendered to the French authori- ties, they broke their make-believe weapons and gave pieces of them to the just-released hostages as souvenirs. Although the long ordeal is over, the hijacked passengers, along with authori- ties at the Keflavik International Air- port will long remember the day in September when a hijacked plane flew tp Iceland—the first ever for this coun- try. Each person involved hopes it never happens again.

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