The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 24.09.1976, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 24.09.1976, Blaðsíða 1
\ White Falcon Volume XXXII Number 38 Keflavik, Iceland September 24. 1976 NavFac wins Golden Anchor NAVAL FACILITY career counselor, OTC Charles Lomonaco, and Lieutenant Richard Thacker, executive officer, demonstrate how to paint the anchor ggld for NAVFAC personnel. Navy limits accompanied duty overseas to small families Enlisted personnel with more than three dependents will not be assigned to accompanied overseas duty except under exceptional circumstances, according to a Bureau of Naval Personnel notice, BuPers Notice 1306, dated Sept. 1, 1976, sets up the new policy and ex- plains that the basic cause is a con- tinuing' decrease in funds for travel, transportation and associated entitle- ments for Permanent Change of Station (PCS) moves. The bureau says this trend of acute constraints on PCS funds in the military appropriations bills is expected to con- tinue in the foreseeable future. This lack- of funds, coupled with the fact that many overseas locations do not have logistic facilities capable of absorbing TIS, TIR requirements for Feb. exams changed The E-4, E-5 and E-6 time in service . (TIS) and time in rate (TIR) require- ments for the February advancement exams have been changed, according to the Ca- reer Counselor's Office. The TIS requirement has been changed from May 1, 1977 to Sept. 1, 1977, and the TIR to June 1, 1977. Navy personnel whose TIS and TIR eli- gibility falls between May 1 and Sept. 1, 1977 will now be eligible to participate in the February advancement exam. Personnel are reminded, however, that all requirements must be in by Nov. 5 and that candidates must complete their military requirements, if applic- able, before taking the Military Leader- ship exam. The number of participants in the February 76 exam for E-4 fell consider- ably below Navy needs and per exam esti- mates. Preliminary findings also indi- cate that the August 76 exam takers were significantly less than anticipated. According to planning information Itovailable, less than 50 per cent of E-3 ^personnel eligible for Et-4 by TIS/TIR criteria are taking the E-4 exams. His- torically, this percentage has been 55 per cent- To justify additional petty officer authorizations, and to support validated increases in Navy-wide manpower require- ments, the Navy must concurrently de- monstrate the capability to produce re- quired number of petty officers. According to the Command Career Coun- selor, a healthy Navy personnel readi- ness posture demands that all eligible and qualified candidates participate in the advancement process. He also added that renewed efforts on the part of all personnel are essential to achieving this objective. personnel with large numbers of depen- dents, has forced the new policy. Therefore, consideration must be giv- en to the number, age and health of de- pendents of personnel selected for as- signment ot accompanied overseas tours. Enlisted personnel with more than three dependents will not be assigned to such tours unless as urgent requirement exists and a conscious desision is made, after reviewing living conditions, availability of adequate quarters and other pertinent information. Under this policy, duty in Alaska and Hawaii is considered to be overseas. In instances where it is necessary to send a Navy person overseas regardless of the number of dependents involved, area commanders will closely monitor in- coming personnel orders. When a poten- tial logistics problem may be created by accompanying dependents, area clearance will be temporarily withheld for the dependents, and the Chief of Naval Per- sonnel will be notified to resolve the problem. Service members in such cases will normally receive an order modification for an unaccompanied tour, or, if neces- sary, be reassigned to another area. 57th FIS Maintenance praised for repairs A Marine F-4J Phantom II Fighter/ Bomber was damaged in a minor ground ac- cident while parked here Sept. 9. The F-4 had stopped for refueling, enroute from Cherry Point Marine Corps Air Station, N. C, to participate in "Teamwork 76." The 57th Fighter Interceptor Squadron maintenance personnel were requested to evaluate the damage and estimate the corrective action required, based on their knowledge and exp ice in F-4 maintenance. Upon arrival of a replacement outer wing section, the Phase/Reclamation Sec- of the 57th volunteered to repair the aircraft. According to the shop chief, Techni- cal Sergeant William A. Denike, his sec- tion spent two days in replacing the wing section and associated hydraulic, electrical and instrumentation compo- nents. Special recognition is extended to Staff Sergeant Elbert Backus, Staff Sergeant William V. Blanton and Staff Sergeant Alfred L. Jones for their superior performance. Their work enabled the aircraft to continue on its way to participate in "Teamwork 76," in a minimum amount of time. Naval Facility Keflavik won the fis- cal year 76 Commander-in-Chief Atlantic Fleet Golden Anchor award for outstand- ing achievement in personnel retention. The Naval Facility was nominated last month by Commander Oceanographic Systems Atlantic for the award, The nomination was submitted to CinClantFlt for the an- nual competition. Last week, the retention efforts of the Naval Facility became apparent when CinClantFlt announced the award winners. Among the small shore-based commands in the Atlantic Fleet, Naval Facility Kef- lavik was selected along with Seal Team Two of Little Creek Va. for the award. The announcement, received in a mes- sage format, reads as follows: "The Com- mander-in-Chief takes great pride in an- nouncing the Golden Anchor Award winners and runner-ups for the Fiscal Year 1976 Atlantic Fleet Retention Program. Award winners will be presented a citation and plaque and are authorized to paint their anchors gold in recogni- tion." The message further stated, "there were many fine nominees in the FY 76 competition. These activities and Units are singled-out and officially re- cognized for their "head and shoulders" command support, administrative manage- ment, and retention team excellence in promoting the Navy's retention program within the Atlantic Fleet...." The Contributing factor at the Naval Facility counseling/retention program is Chief Ocean Systems Technician Charles T. Lomonaco, NavFac's command career counselor. He pointed out that the most signifi- cant aspect of his task as career coun- selor is getting out and meeting with people of the command at every oppor- tunity. He explained that people have an impulse to buy items on a department store shelf simply because they see it. "Similarly, NavFac personnel are called by impulse to ask questions about the Navy and their respective career simply because the career counsleor is in sight and available," he said. He also stated that although inter- views should be done in an office atmo- sphere, approximately 75 per cent of his counseling is on a "stand-up" basis. "When an individual has a question per- taining to his career, he or she cannot wait for an appointment and does not care about the setting. The individual's main concern is in getting an answer to a question or a solution to a problem." According to Chief Lomonaco, when he was assigned as NacFac's career counselor in Nov. 1975, the counseling and retention program was virtually non-existent. "By taking a positive look at what was needed and never lowering my goal, and with the decication and perseverance of all the command's personnel—from the commanding officer down through the re- tention team—division officers, chief petty officers and leading petty of- ficers, I was able to achieve this goal in eight months. "The biggest reward, I believe, is when I had good news for an individual from his or her detailer. The "thanks chief" and a gratifying smile gave me my greatest satisfaction. "I owe much of the success of our program to Chief Farley, the Naval Sta- tion command career counselor: "He took the time out of his busy schedule to help us." "Last, but definitely not least, we include the Navy wives in our retention program. They are counseled with their husbands and have been given lectures pertaining to the Navy and the import- ance of the jobs their husbands are per- forming. I personally feel that when a husband raises his hand and repeats the reenlistment oath—if you listen real close, you might hear him say "we do," because behind every happily married Navy man is a satisfied wife who enjoys being a part of his world." AFI receives Outstanding Unit Award; holds 'Dining Out9 by 2»dLt. "Unity" helped win the Air Force Out- standing Unit Award for Air Forces Ice- land. Although the award technically was presented about a year ago, no for- mal presentation was made until last week. General Daniel James Jr. made the presentation then as part of his three- day visit to Iceland. Colonel William Lindeman, AFI com- mander, accepted the honor on behalf of AFI and the other units involved, the 932nd and 667th Aircraft Control and Warning Squadrons (AC&W) and the 57th Fighter Interceptor Squadron, during ceremonies held in Hangar 830. The Air Force Outstanding Unit Award was awarded by the Secretary of the Air Force for exceptionally meritorious service from July 1, 1973 to June 30, GENERAL JAMES pins ing Unit Award. on the AFI Outstand- Lytda TiyUr 1975. "During this time period, person- nel of AFI distinguished themselves by the outstanding manner in which they ac- complished their primary mission...the operational effectiveness was attested to by highly successful Aerospace De- fence Command inspections," read an ex- cerpt from the citation which accompa- nied the award. Diaing Oat "Unity" was also the theme of the ad- dress Gen. James gave during the Air Force 29th anniversary Dining Out. The occasion, sponsored by AFI, featured the Commander-in-Chief of North American Air Defense Command (NORAD) and U.S. Air Force Defense Command (ADCOM) as guest of honor and,guest speaker. The NORAD/ ADCOM Commander-in-Chief stressed the fact that everyone, regardless of race, sex or rank, is a part of a whole in the Air Force as well as in civilian life. Drawing upon his own background, Gen. James illustrated that each person Is an individual and a member of the whole, and that he has responsibilities in each case. Dissent is a matter of belief, but "Don't ever become so involved in your dissent that you forget to contribute," he said, quoting his mother. The gener- al himself has been quoted elsewhere as saying, "If you're not part of the solu- tion, then you're surely part of the problem." Uaity The idea Is to form a unity, to "Reach your hand out to those who will help pull you up. There are people, waiting to help. And you," emphasized the general, "the majority, don't you make me a liar. Make sure your hand is outstretched." The power of unity also received em- phasis. "Don't walk softly and carry a big stick unless your adversary knows you'll use it if you have to. Never let (Continued on Page 3)

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