The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 08.10.1976, Blaðsíða 3

The White Falcon - 08.10.1976, Blaðsíða 3
October 8, 1976 Page 3 J Nary Day messages Frtw tk« CNO... During this national Bicentennial year, it is fitting that Navy men and women around the world pause to re- flect on their past and look toward their future. For more than two cen- turies, the Navy has served as a vi- tal part of the defense force of this country. We have grown in strength and experience, and have adapted to meet the requirements of a rapidly changing world. In our third century of service, it is imperative that we look to our horizons while remembering our heri- tage, we are rebuilding our material forces with an eye toward the future and an emphasis on quality and versa- tility. Our most important requirement, however, is professionally trained personnel to operate our ships and aircraft. The men and women 'who serve in the United States Navy are among the most dedicated and well- trained in the world. We must not allow that to change. It gives me great personal pride and satisfaction to be able to ad- dress our men and women on the Navy's 201st anniversary. As we approach our future, let us rededicate our- selves to the spirit of cooperation and achievement which has made the United States and its Navy so great. Admiral James L. Holloway III Chief of Naval Operations U.S. Navy From IDF coram «n«Wr... Navy Birthday 1976—Heritage and Horizons—is to be commemorated on Wednesday, October 13, 1976. Although many changes have oc- curred in our Navy's 201-year his- tory, the precepts of Jones, Farragut, Bainbridge, Truxtun, and many other Naval heroes continue to guide our actions. We should exhibit the highest tra- ditions of the Naval Service as we care for the men, women, wives, hus- bands, sons and daughters that make up our Navy family. We must encourage our young men and women to stay with the Navy and grow and develop to their full poten- tial. Addresses are urged to participate in the military and social programs that will take place aboard the Naval Station during the week October 10 to 16. This period offers an ideal op- portunity to commemorate the Navy's 201st birthday and to stress total involvement, commitment, and respon- sibility. It is suggested that all Navy personnel be encouraged to wear the service dress uniform on Wednes- day, October 13, 1976. The Iceland Navy community shares a proud heritage. You have worked hard, sometimes under difficult and trying situations, and have performed your task in a superb manner. Your efforts today will build a heritage for generations of the future. As we commemorate Navy Birthday 1976, we should reflect on our accom- plishments and look forward to the challenges that await us tomorrow. I hope that each of us have helped make the Navy life better. Happy Birth- day . Rear Admiral Karl J. Bernstein Commander Iceland Defense Force Fran Ik* CO... Wavy Day 1976 offers me an oppor- tunity to thank each of you for your dedicated service to our country, our principles and to our mission in Ice- land. Our theme this year is "Heritage and Horizons." Each of us, according to our own experience and background, can find in that theme whatever we wish. I am proud of the Heritage we represent. I am proud of the way each of you upholds the customs and traditions associated with that Heri- tage. I look forward to the new Horizons of tomorrow and the future with eager anticipation. We have seen in our lifetime, technological and sociological ad- vances unequaled in any other period of history. It is up to us—you and me—to use our talents to further the Heritage of the United States Navy while we work toward the Horizons of tomorrow. Captain Jack T. Weir Commanding Officer U.S. Naval Station Keflavik Commander Naval Forces Iceland Heritage mnd Horizons REFLECTIONS OF A SAILOR and a sunset through the porthole of the past, looking in- to the technology of the future. (Photo by J02 Terry Barnthouse) U.S. NAVY BIRTHDAY OCTOBER 13,1976 Uncle Sam's ships? the letters USS preceding the name of a ship are, of course, the initials of the words "United States Ship." However, that's not what it meant in the begin- ning. Back in the days of sails, a ship was identified by its type. For in- stance, there was the United States Sloop of War Providence or United States Frigate Alliance. When steam began to replace the not-so-reliable wind as a means of propulsion, ship designations changed accordingly to U.S. Steam Fri- gate, etc. Later, when steam completely replaced sails, it was common to call a ship U.S. Steamer. This may well have been the orgin of "HSS," although there is no official proof on its authentici- ty. One other explanation is linked to an expression that has come to symbolize our country-Uncle Sam. The conversation of jacktars of the early American Navy might have led listeners to conclude that USS stood for "Uncle Sam's Ship." Although there is some controversy as to the exact derivation of Uncle Sam, the most commonly accepted version has the expression originating shortly after the declaration of the War of 1812. In those days, Elbert Anderson, a food contractor for the U.S. Army, pur- chased considerable quantities of beef and pork from a concentration of sup- plies near Troy, N.Y. The inspectors of these items at that place were Ebenezer Wilson and his uncle, Samuel Wilson. The latter gentleman (Known around those parts as "Uncle Sam") generally superin- tended in person a large number of work- men employed in preparing the provisions bought by the Army. Wilson's workers marked "E.A. - U.S." on each case, thus identifying the con- tents of having been procured by Elbert Anderson on behalf of the United States. One day, someone new to the job asked a case marker the meaning of the let- ters. (Use of U.S. for United States was then almost unknown.) The marker re- plied facetiously that "he didn't know unless it meant Elbert Anderson and Uncle Sam" - alluding, of course, to Uncle Sam Wilson. As the war progressed, many of the Wilson employes were recruited as sol- diers and sailors. Whenever they came across a box or cask with the "E.A. - U.S." stamp, they would laugh and refer to it as some more of Uncle Sam's sup- plies. The joke caught on and spread throughout the nation. "Uncle Sam" Wilson, Elbert Anderson and their workmen have long since been forgotten> but traditions die hard. Girl saves brothers from fire (continued from page u in a pan of grease on the kitchen stove, spread quickly to cabinets where aerosol cans exploded and added fuel to the fire which spread to the dining room, living room and up the staircase. The Swasey's downstairs furniture was extensively damaged by smoke and water and the apartment was substantially dam- aged by fire. Shortly after the fire, the respond- ing Fire Captain, Stefan Eiriksson, said Kim did everything correctly and was directly responsible for snving the lives of her brothers. At the ceremony Tuesday, Fire Chief Sveinn Eiriksson confirmed that: "We adults could take a lesson from your ac- tions," he told Kim. "This one incident makes our six years of Operation EDITH worthwhile." Fire Chief Eiriksson presented Kim a statue of a fireman with this inscrip- tion: "Edith-presented to Miss Kimberly Swasey for her heroic action in a fire that took place in her home on June 30, 1976. From the U. S. Naval Station Kef- lavik Fire Department." Capt. Weir also presented Kim a Naval Station Keflavik "Service" plaque. Tuesday also was, appropriately, the day of the annual Operation EDITH (Exit Drill in the Home) training. At 5;30 p.m., NATO Base firemen went to family housing units to assist occupants in de- veloping and practicing a secondary -es- cape route from their homes. Operation EDITH traditionally has been conducted during Fire Prevention Week to encourage people to plan what to do in case of a fire. Naval Station Keflavik is the only known community which practices the drill, now in its seventh year. For Kim Swasey and her family, Oper- ation EDITH and fire are very real. ADR1 Swasey choked back his emotion at the ceremony Tuesday to publicly thank the community for their assistance after the fire. "We could not have made it without the total community support we had," he said. "And I want to thank everyone who was so kind. People brought dishes, blankets, and clothing. Neighbors came in and took our clothes to wash, helped salvage our belongings and helped us to clean up. Everyone on the base from the captain on down, did all they ccould to help us. I want to say thank you." Burke Adams, Principal in Charge of the DOD School System and Upper School Principal Loyd Morrow also were at the ceremony to add their congratulations, and to praise Kim. Historic Events October 9,1779 - In the United States' joint naval operation with France, the combined fleet repelled a British attack on Savannah, Ga. October 10,1845 — The Naval School, forerunner of the present day Naval Academy, opened at Annapolis, Md. under the leadership of Captain Frank Buchanan. October 11, 1776 — Three days of naval actions on Lake Champlain began as an American squadron com- mand by Benedict Arnold turned back the British in- vasion from Canada thus saving Washington's army from attack. October 12,1915 The collier JUPITER became the first Navy ship to complete a transit of the Panama* Canal. Entering the Pacific side on October 10, she stopped in Gatun Lake to study the effect of fresh water on barnacles. October 13,1901 — The chapel at Mare Island was dedicated and today is the oldest in the Navy. October 13, 1775 — Congress appointed a commit- tee to fit out two vessels, one of 14 guns and the other of 10 guns, to cruise the Atlantic and intercept British transports. This date is officially considered the birthday of the U.S. Navy. October 16,1917 — Gunner's Mate First Class Osmond K. Ingram became the first U.S. Navy casu- alty in World War I when he was thrown overboard during an attack on his ship while he tried to launch a depth charge by hand. The first ship ever named for an enlisted man honors GM1 Ingram. Navy Day (continued from page 1) chandise in most departments will be sold at reduced prices. Also, a number of items will be given away which in- clude perfume, colognes, cigars, candy, stationery, bubble gum and other sur- prises. **The Barber Shop will offer shampoos and beard trims for 75 cents during the five-day period. **At the Service Station, some mer- chandise will be offered at reduced pri- ces and, as an added incentive, a gift will be given to the 201st customer at the station. **At Personalized Services, a 10 per cent discount on all plants and fresh cut flowers will be featured. Also, all engraving will be done at half price and a five per cent savings given for all film picked up and imprinting on shirts. **A11 permanents during the Navy Day birthday sale will be given at a 25 per cent savings. "Savings will also be offered to pa- trons at the various beverage stores and cafeterias. For these and other savings more information is available on page two of this issue. Shoppers at the Commissary will find many marked-down items during the period beginning Oct. 6 through Oct. 16. Pet foods, relishes, soups, vegetables, cake mixes, juices, cleaning liquids and ice cream toppings are just some of the items to be offered at reduced savings. For more information readers may check the Commissary column on page two. A special dance at the Youth Center, featuring music by "Dark Star" will be held on Saturday, Oct. 16. The teen dance will be for seventh graders and older and will be held from 8 p.m. to midnight. Sixth graders may also attend if they have permission slips from their parents, but, they may only stay until 11 p.m. The cost for the dance is $1.50 per person. AFRS.AFTV To help publicize Navy Day 1976, A- merican Forces radio/television spots have been featuring not only historical vignettes but also actual Navy Day events. On Wednesday evening, at 7:30 p.m., the film "Born of the Sea" will be shown on television. Within the film, historian Bruce Catton depicts the par- allel between the nation's 200 year struggle to maintain freedom and the history of the Navy. Since that historic day in 1775 when Colonial legislators determined the need for a Navy, to its present stature as the world's strongest, the key ingredi- ent of the Navy's glamorous history has been people. Without the high caliber of the Navy men and women who have served through the years, the Navy, and perhaps even our country, could not have survived. World events have often changed the course of the Navy but, plotters were always quick to navigate back to an even keel. The Navy's long heritage is de- tailed in history books. No one person can predict what the future will bring. One can only surmise that what with the highly-skilled and truly dedicated men and women serving today—maintaining that proud heritage— the Navy's future on the horizon is very promising. The U.S. Navy has, in the past, and will, in the future, project itself world-wide as a key instrument of "Power for Peace".

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