The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 15.10.1976, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 15.10.1976, Blaðsíða 1
y White Falcon Volume XXXII Number- 41 Keflavik, Iceland Octobmr 15. 1976 Closed circuit TV becoming reality on the NATO Base Thanksgiving Day you should be able to watch a football game on closed cir- cuit television or listen to stereo music over closed circuit FM radio if ftvou reside in U. S. government housing Pin the NATO base. If neither of those options suits your taste, American Forces Radio 1484 AM will continue nor- mal broadcasting on a radiated signal. Captain Jack T. Weir, Naval Station Commanding Officer, chaired a meeting of the closed circuit television system committee last Friday and announced plans to complete the system on the base New rotation plan for Navy women announced A new overseas rotation pattern for enlisted women has been created by the Bureau of Naval Personnel to make sea/ shore rotation patterns for enlisted men and women more equitable. The rotation plan, designated OUTUS/ CONUS instead of sea/shore, recognizes that women are prohibited by law from shipboard or sea-going assignments. Also considered was the fact that sea duty opportunities for women have been limit- ed to remote overseas activities, while men on sea duty may be homeported in CONUS. Women now may expect no more than two back-to-back overseas tours to no less than one tour in CONUS. Overseas as- signments will be for the prescribed area tour length, and CONUS tours will parallel the shore tours of their male counterparts. For a majority of the ratings, women can expect consecutive OUTUS tours. The ratings for which consecutive OUTUS tours for women normally will not be required include AC, ADR, AG, AK, AQ, AS, ASE, ASH, ASM, AV, AX, CTA, DK, DM, DP, DT, HM, MA, MU, NC, PN, PR, TD and TO. Details on the new rotation plan will be in a forthcoming BuPers notice. by Thanksgiving. Once the system is completely installed and tested on the base, at Rockville and at Grindavik, the atmospheric signal will be terminated. Television viewers will notice very little initial change in programming. There still will be only one entertain- ment channel and program selection will not change significantly from current schedules. However, in the field of radio, listeners will enjoy a wider se- lection in FM stereo programming. American Forces Radio is planning a program package that will include at least 16 hours daily FM music. Programs are being planned to allow maximum un- interrupted music, while maintaining the flexibility necessary to keep the audi- ence informed with expanded news summar- ies and on base activities. The closed circuit system has been in planning and engineering design for more than two years. In August, a team of engineers arrived in Keflavik to oversee the installation of more than 60,000 feet of coaxial cable for the system. The work is scheduled for completion by early November. A NATO base crew is installing cable hookups in barracks and family housing units and in other areas where closed circuit will be provided. The Navy Exchange has on order ap- proximately 2,000 cable hookup kits which will connect the wall hookup to television and stereo sets. Additional cable will be available for persons who wish to run extensions or connect more than one unit to the system. These hookup kits are necessary to receive closed circuit programming and must be purchased by individuals who want to receive programming. According to J. C. Grimsley, Navy Ex- change Merchandising Manager, the basic hookup kit will cost about $4.00. They will be sold in the Personalized Serv- ices Center at the Exchange, the Bever- age Store, Stereo Shop, Mini-Mart and Viking Convenience Store. They will go on sale Nov. 2. NavSta Fire Department honors contest winners Winners of the poster, slogan and es- say contests were announced and given recognition for their contributions during Fire Prevention Week, k An awards ceremony was held at the A. Wi. Mahan Elementary School last week. The contests were sponsored by the Naval Station Fire Department. Winning entries were as follows: Poster First prize John Pasterczyk Sandra White Second prize Celia Carter Valerie Starr Slogan First prize Andrew Palmer Thomas Preston Michelle Collins Patrick Casey Essay First prize John Christopherson Kathy Windbigler Second prize Stacey Fuller Joe Pasterczyk Captain Jack T. Weir, Commander Naval Forces Iceland/Commanding Officer, Station Keflavik, and Colonel William Lindeman, Commander Air Forces Ice- land, sign joint CFC0A contributions. CFCOA tallies $21,000 to date The NATO Base Combined Federal Cam- paign Overseas Area has received about $21,000 in pledges, Lieutenant Colonel Jerry M. Miles, Iceland Defense Force CFCOA coordinator, announced Wednesday. Outstanding contributors in the campaign so far are Air Forces Iceland and the Naval Security Group Activity. Tire requirements outlined NATO Base personnel are urged to con- tribute on a completely voluntary basis. A number of organizations receive CFCOA funds. IDF members may designate their contribution to a specific organization. Last year an estimated $52,000 was donated in the fund drive. The campaign began Sept. 13 and will run to Oct. 31. Traffic conditions Alfa, Bravo, Charlie—know them and heed FOR THEIR WINNING ENTRIES, Assistant Fire Chief Haraldur Stefansson awards A. T. Mahan Elementary students certificates of appreciation. Winter driving in Iceland poses unpredictable safety hazards, according to Lieutenant J. M. McAuley, Naval Sta- tion security officer. Lt. McAuley also stated that Icelandic law requires some- thing more than just regular tires (ra- dials included) to be used when driving on ice and snow. Beginning today through May 1, ve- hicle owners are allowed the following options: Non-studded snow tires on all wheels, studded snow tires on all wheels and studded or non-studded tires on the front wheels with chains on the rear wheels. Traditionally in Iceland, studded Modified form 15 for Christmas parcels issued A modified Christmas Form 15 was is- sued Tuesday, according to Lieutenant Commander William J. Ford, Iceland De- fense Force Staff Judge Advocate. "This is a special privilege we've been granted," explained LCdr. Ford, stating that each year the government of Iceland grants special permission to NATO Base personnel for take-off of Christmas mail packages. Christmas packages, received in the mail, may be removed from the Agreed Area through the Turner Gate from Nov. 30 to Jan. 30, 1977. The original mail package must be taken "as is" to the take-off gate for customs inspection. Non-electrical toys for children un- der 14 are allowed on a "take-off" basis also from Nov. 23 to Jan. 8, 1977. An allowance of $30 per child under 14 in the immediate family will be allowed. Toy removal must be performed on the same day during one trip. In addition, NATO Base personnel may use the modified Christmas Form 15, be- ginning Nov. 23 through Christmas, for removing a Christmas tree and a reason- able number of non-electrical Christmas tree ornaments. The form is available for pick-up at the Naval Station Legal Office, Iceland Defense Force Staff Judge Advocate, Naval Communications Station, Grindavik and the Naval Security Group Activity as well as the other tenant commands. Instructions for using the form are printed on it. tires are mounted on the first day of ¦ winter, Oct. 27. , Together with these snow tire regula- tions, three traffic conditions may be: declared to assist in winter traffic safety at the NATO Base. They are: ALPHA LIMITED: Traffic proceeds as re- quired by existing conditions, but at a reduced speed of 20 m.p.h. BRAVO: Movement of emergency and essen- tial traffic is permitted. Essential traffic is defined as official vehicles,, service vehicles, buses and private ve- hicular traffic necessary to proceed to and from work. When this condition is in effect, snow tires or chains are re- quired as a safety measure. CHARLIE: Emergency vehicles only are¦ allowed to move at a reduced speed. Emergency vehicles include ambulances, fire department vehicles, command and duty officer vehicles, private vehicles on recall and snow removal equipment. With the days getting shorter, acci- dents, occurring while backing, have almost tripled. Extra precaution must be taken to prevent an obstruction which blocks a backing vehicle's path. The security officer advises that special consideration must be given to driving in blowing snow during the day; blowing snow conditions at night pose an additional safety hazard. Scraping and cleaning windshields and all windows is also a required safety' precaution. The following are some important safety points to remember concerning winter driving: —vehicles cannot stop effectively on ice. —melting ice is often slicker than fro- zen ice. —chains and studded tires are not as effective on ice as regular tires are on dry roads. —high winds affect braking. —brakes work better on ice if they are- pumped. —"black ice" is almost impossible to see, and it is very dangerous. —blowing snow can make vehicles in front of you disappear. —drifting snow often makes it impossi-: ble for two vehicles to pass. —pedestrians are very hard to see. —snow removal equipment always has the right-of-way. —help others if they get stuck.

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The White Falcon

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