The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 29.10.1976, Blaðsíða 3

The White Falcon - 29.10.1976, Blaðsíða 3
October 29, 1976 Page 3 ? •* CARING BY SHARING are two Cooperative Work Experience students, Karen Bel in and Kathy Spaulding (far right). Lieutenant (junior grade) Diane Knope, Navy Nurse Corps, explains procedures in treating a six-week-old patient. 'THIS IS JUST A PLANE PART', Staff Sergeant Elbert Backus, a 57th FIS jet mechanic seems to indicate to Jim Thorpe, a CWE student (left). TO AID THE PATIENT, Edna Hooks com- pletes a test at the Naval Station Dispensary where she is employed in the Cooperative Work Experience pro- gram for high school credit in career education. MAKING A BLOOD TEST is one duty of Gay Mueller, also a Cooperative Work Experience student, who will receive career education credit for her on- the-job training in the A. T. Mahan High School work program. Stvry u4 »Im*m by JOS J«rry FmIw Coordinator stresses advantages students receive Prospective employers, desiring to employ Cooperative Work Experience stu- dents, may still contact the A. T. Mahan High School, reports Wolfgang Plakinger, CWE coordinator. A letter of recommendation from an employer is particularly useful in ob- taining a scholarship...interested em- ployers should call 7008 or 7412, the coordinator states. According to the national work-study trend, Mr. Plakinger relates, the most important goal for career education shall be to better prepare the student for a more realistic career choice upon completion of formal education. This goal is reenforced by the fol- lowing statistic in a career education brochure, "As only 12 per cent of the student population will finish college, the large majority will be involved in trade school or on-the-job training (OJT), to prepare for a job." CWE strengthens experience in career-oriented education Twenty-four A. T. Mahan High School students are enrolled this year in the Cooperative Work Experience (CWE), ac- cording to Wolfgang Plakinger, CWE coor- dinator. This program, which stresses actual work experience in a career-related field, "should help the student deter- mine his or her potential future suc- cess...to better prepare...for competi- tion in the job market or future school endeavor," states a career education brochure. Practical application through on-the- job work is supplemented through theory in the classroom. The CWE coordinator explains that most student evaluations and perfor- mance ratings are measured by on-the-job training rather than class study. The CWE thrust serves as the most im- portant proving ground, the coordinator emphasizes, because of the skill and knowledge that the student may acquire. As a proving ground, the basis is derived from doing, performing, applying and contributing, sharing and learning with adults on-the-job. In turn, up-to-date information may be obtained from authoritative sources on-the-job. Also, students have an op- portunity to work with specific equip- ment and associated material. A student will receive one credit for each hour involved in the program. The class is evaluated on their work situation performance and one hour week- ly is spent in the classroom. The three-part evaluation includes: Attitudes, the interview and employer/ employee relationships. The overall program shows one's weaknesses and strengths for a future career, the coor- dinator indicates. He also mentioned that the program is directed by the Department of Defense Atlantic Region, which has implemented career education overseas within the past five years. A. T. Mahan students are engaged in career fields such as nursing and medi- cal technology, broadcasting and comput- er systems. Out of 150 senior high students, 14 seniors in a class of 30 participate in CWE. Career education teaching methods at Keflavik comprise three areas in addi- tion to CWE: Vocational exploration group, career group rap session and the Singer Program which gives an overview of a specific career area via tape, filmstrips and an end-evaluation. CWE encompasses three phases. First, at the elementary level, students are encouraged to have an awareness concern- ing career fields. Secondly, an exploratory stage is set aside for the junior high level. And, thirdly, a skill-developing ap- proach is taken in high school. Together with these various aspects of career education, the foundation is laid for such an experience, even in the first grade where a student starts to associate what adults do, Mr. Plakinger stated in retrospect. 'Pilots' career studied To highlight their weekly career edu- cation on 'pilots', second through sixth graders at A. T. Mahan visited the 57th Fighter Interceptor Squadron and Patrol Squadron 49 last week. While touring the hangar areas, the seven elementary classes explored first- hand the flight system, weapons system and survival equipment. Earlier in the week, First Lieutenant William B. Donahoe a 57th pilot, spoke to the lower school students, showing a film and demonstrating survival gear. Together with the tour and presenta- tion, a paper airplane contest was also held. The winners are as follows: respectively, grades one through sixth, Andrew Jenkins, Patrick Carter, Kevin Casey, Valur Millard, Michael Ritoch and Jeffery Cogley. DOUBLE-CHECKING THE WEATHER, Derenda Duchein marks a report at the Naval Weather Service Environmental Detachment. tEScui; 1 PEERING INTO A "PHANTOM", elementary school students listen to First Lieutenant Philip C. DeBruin, a 57th Fighter Interceptor Squadron pilot.

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The White Falcon

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