The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 19.11.1976, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 19.11.1976, Blaðsíða 1
White Falcon Volume XXXII Number 46 Keflavik, Iceland November 19. 1976 CCTV.FM will sign on Day After more than two years of plann- ing, four months of hard work by con- tractor personnel and special sales at the Navy Exchange, closed-circuit tel- evision and FM Stereo music for the NATO Base becomes a reality on Thursday- Thanksgiving Day. During the past several months, sto- ries in the "White Falcon" have discuss- ed the strange looking cable laying machine, what the community can expect from closed-circuit, and how residents can purchase the special cable hookups. By Thursday, NATO Base residents must have their television sets connected to the cable system and tunedi to Channel Four (instead of Channel Eight) before any television can be seen. Persons should have purchased the required cable from the Navy Exchange to enable them to connect their sets to the wall jack. If you want to listen to FM Stereo music, in addition to having the tele- vision capability, you should purchase a special splitter and extra cable from the exchange's TV Repair Store. Cable connection kits are available from the Navy Exchange at the Personal- ized Services Center, Main Store and Stereo Shop. Help and supplies for spe- cial hookups are sold only at the TV Re- pair Store. Special holiday programming has been planned for Thanksgiving Day. The tel- evision day begins at 9 a.m. and con- tinues throughout the day and evening. A variety of programs have been sched- uled, including several Thanksgiving Day specials and a pro football game. For FM Stereo buffs, the programming begins with sign-on at 8 a.m. and will continue until midnight. This schedule will continue daily thereafter. All types of easy listening and classical music is on tap, and listeners may hear it by tuning their receivers to 88.5. The schedule for AM Radio has been revised to reflect the desires of those who responded to the recent AFRTS sur- vey, (see the accompanying story for the survey resultes) . The AM Radio Sta- tion, however, will continue broadcast- ing on the same frequency (1484) 24 hours daily . On Thanksgiving Day when the closed- circuit cable system goes into effect, some problems are expected to occur. During the past several weeks, extensive testing has been done on the system to ensure everything is working. Included in this testing have been two "full run" tests with favorable results. If problems do arise, however, resi- dents are reminded to first check the connection from the wall plug to the antenna hookup on their set for loose wires. If all seems in order with the hookup, persons may then call 4100 to report the trouble. This telephone num-* ber is for the Trouble Desk at the Pub- lic Works Department. With the introduction of the closed- circuit system on the Naval Station, television viewers can expect little or no immediate change to the programming. The television station presently broadcasts about 86 hours weekly. The bulk of the programming films and video tapes arrive from the American Forces Radio and Television Service, Los Angeles via a special routing circuit. Consequently, very little can be done to eliminate the problems of the variety of shows or the age of some of the shows. The closed-circuit system is here to stay. The quality of reception can only be measured by those who watch tel- evision or by those who listen to FM radio. Thanksgiving Day should prove to be a pleasant and relaxing day for all. survey indicates 8-10 aJtn. programming most popular What local and prerecorded radio shows do you like best? What type of music do you prefer? During what time of the day do you listen to the radio? These and other questions were part of a radio station survey that was dis- tributed during the late summer months. The survey has been computed and the re- sults now can be used during the coming months as an aid in program scheduling. The four-part, 22-question survey, required annually by the Department of Defense, is a key to evaluating listener preference and can be used by station disc jockeys to help build their pro- grams . Additionally, the results of the sur- vey are forwarded to the American Forces Radio and Television Service, Los Angeles. They in turn will compile the results of this and other surveys from AFRTS stations worldwide. If necessary, Los Angeles will then program changes to the prerecorded shows they distribute. About 3,500 surveys were distributed throughout the NATO Base. Military per- sonnel and their dependents were given the opportunity to complete the survey and return it to the Naval Station Pub- lic Affairs Office. Of the question- naires distributed, 1,049 were returned and thus computed. The following is a discussion of the survey results. Anyone desiring to look through the complete survey may do so by coming to the Public Affairs Of- fice, located near the Navy Exchange complex. The majority of AFRS listeners prefer the 8-10 a.m. time slot the most, with the 1-5 p.m. time slot being the second most popular. The least popular was the 1-6 a.m. time slot and a very small per- centage say they never listen. nusic preferences of NATO Base lis- teners seems to have changed little from last year. The majority prefer rock and Top 40 music with country and western as the third most popular. Easy listening music is somewhat popular, while folk, jazz, soul and classical music proved to be the least popular. In rating both local and network news, sports and weather, the majority [of listeners considered this program- ming "so-so" and "adequate". On rating prerecorded programming from AFRTS Los Angeles, the majority of listeners opted for the "no opinion" re- sponse. (The reason for this may be be- cause the audience identified more with the type of music played rather than with radio personalities.) Mystery Theater and the Golden Days of Radio proved to be very popular with the audience. Jazz Scene was disliked to varying degrees by listeners and, again, the "no opinion" response was marked often. Community Bulletin Board is popular with the audience. Also, live radio newscasts are popular as is the after- noon drive time show. The Morning Show, After Midnight Show and Weekend Country also rated statistically high on the survey. Most responses about these shows, however, indicated a "no opin- ion." In terms of variety of information and entertainment programming, the audience states that it is of an ac- ceptable variety. The majority of re- sponses state either that the audience thought programming was excellent, good or acceptable. As stated previously, the survey is but one element to evaluate listener preferences. Above all, it has been im- portant to program for all sections of the NATO Base community, providing en- tertainment for all tastes. Other in- dicators of listener preference are ob- tained through various Human Relations Councils, through specific record re- quests which are phoned-in during a show, and by responses gained from the many persons who come into the station during a normal week. The interests of the audience on the NATO Base is the primary controlling factor for radio station programming. The station attempts to please most of the people most of the time and some of the people some of the time. (See scheduling on page 3) Foreign Ministry grants holiday mail privilege The Foreign Ministry has granted au- thority for Icelandic citizens who are married to U.S. citizens and reside on the NATO Base, to mail Christmas pack- ages to relatives in Iceland without going through New York post office. According to Lieutenant Commander William J. Ford, Iceland Defense Force Let,al officer, this one-time authority applies to about 30 Icelandic citizens in the NATO Base community. The authority, he said, is applicable only for three days: Dec. 15, 16 and 17. LCdr. Ford also stressed that the pack- ages must go through the base post of- fice, and have the proper postage and customs declarations affixed. Instead of going through New York and coming back to Iceland via international mail, the base post office will deliver the packages directly to the Icelandic post office at the airport and they will go directly into Iceland's postal sys- tem. DECIDING WHERE TO PUT the Hughes Trophy are key 57th FIS members: Master Ser- geant Frank Thomasy, training NC0IC, Major Lee Hultgren, 57th FIS acting commander and Captain Bill Young, executive officer. The Hughes Aircraft Company has awarded the trophy for 23 years. 'Hughes* names 57th top FIS The 57th FIS was notified Monday that it was again selected "Top Fighter In- terceptor Squadron in the world" by the Hughes Aircraft Company. In winning the annual competition, the unit will be awarded the coveted Hughes Trophy. In fall of 1971, 57th FIS won the award using the F-102 aircraft. This year the unit won it with the F-4C. When notified of their selection, Major Lee Hultgren, acting 57th command- er, said, "Lieutenant Colonel William M. Foy (57th FIS commander, presently com- peting for the William Tell trophy in Florida) will most certainly be proud to accept the Hughes Trophy for all the men and women of the 57th. The awarding of the Hughes Trophy is the highest honor that can be accorded a fighter inter- ceptor squadron. Many of those who con- tributed to the winning of this award have departed and, to them, we owe a special thanks. For those of us who re- main, this is a proud moment to be savored forever." competition, the unit was awarded the coveted Hughes Trophy. The aircraft 57th used then was the F-102. The 57th FIS was notified Monday that it has again won the competition. This time the unit won the trophy with the F-4C. Six months ago, the 57th received a letter which designated them as an Aero- space Defense Command entry. Other entries were the Alaskan Air Command, Tactical Air Command, National Guard Bureau, United States Air Forces Europe and Pacific Air Forces. The 57th FIS Information Office then began compiling a 100-page document, re- cording such data as special deploy- ments, unit awards, personnel incentive programs and individual achievements. Other areas included were unit ef- forts to improve operating procedures, significant community relations pro- grams and sortie reliability. In addition to these categories, man- hour utilization rate by month, assign- ed personnel by function and skill and quality control evaluations were also documented. Finally, Sept. 1, 1976, after exten- sive reviews, Lieutenant Colonel Robert D. Goertz (then 57th FIS commander) wrote a cover letter which read "...The exemplary record established in their air-to-air missile firing at Combat Echo would, in Itself, make them a prime nominee for this award. Yet, in spite of the harshest Icelandic winter in 25 years, they have excelled in all other endeavors as well...The professional, dedicated men and women of the 57th FIS are truly due this highest form of rec- ognition. The Hughes Trophy should deservedly belong to the Black Knights...." And, it will. For one year, the ori- ginal Hughes Trophy will belong to the 57th FIS.

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